Split rims, min pressures

Submitted: Monday, Jun 12, 2006 at 22:52
ThreadID: 34876 Views:1703 Replies:3 FollowUps:0
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Another bloody tyre question, could anybody out there give me a rule of thumb rule for the minimum pressure in a split rim tyre / wheel and some reasons as to how they came up with the reason and pressure.
I understand you are trying to maintain enough friction between the tyre and the rim to stop one spinning on the other and damaging the inner tube. I can't believe that for example a Suzuki Sierra and an F truck wouldn't be the same min pressures, or would they??
Any reasonable explanations would be gratefully accepted, thanks in anticipation.
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Reply By: Muzzgit (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 13, 2006 at 01:16

Tuesday, Jun 13, 2006 at 01:16
It wouldn't be a set pressure, but more the amount of bulge in the side wall.

I recon on a suzi you could get so low the guage wouldn't even register and you'd be alright, but an effie?

When I had split rims on a 75 series ute, I once ventured too close to the waters edge on a sloping beach and had to let them down to below 10 psi to get out (heart in mouth, first time on a beach stuff).

I left them at that for the rest of the day and didn't have any drama's, mind you, I was too scared to go out of second gear for fear of rolling a tyre off the rim.
AnswerID: 178184

Reply By: Member- Rox (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 13, 2006 at 12:35

Tuesday, Jun 13, 2006 at 12:35
I think I've had mine down to 12psi and maybee 8psi but only in a straight line & very short distance.
AnswerID: 178244

Reply By: Pedirka - Tuesday, Jun 13, 2006 at 17:27

Tuesday, Jun 13, 2006 at 17:27
I went down to 8 psi to get up Big Red on split rims in a troopy. Had four goes progressively lowering pressures.
The rim didnt spin inside the tyre on that occasion.
Could only get to 35 kph top speed though. May as wel have started at the bottom and forgot about the run up.

Cheers
AnswerID: 178291

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