One for the Fridgey techs... I am confused!!

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 06:36
ThreadID: 35354 Views:2285 Replies:3 FollowUps:10
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G'day,
Now to start with, I don't want this to get into yet another war about which is better as I already have a fridge and am very happy with it's performance and capacity.

What I would like to know though, I came across this Link while cruising the web. I am sure it may have a use somewhere, maybe not for the average camper or traveller though. My question is, the 80 and the 110 litre models of this brand, perhaps even the 50 and 60 litre models, use the larger compressor the BD50.

How can this unit at 145 litres keep up with the load using a BD 35 compressor? Surely it would almost be running continuously trying to remove the heat? Yet the claim is it is "Extraordinary performance - Minimal power consumption and superbly silent running ".

So Nudie and others, can you shed any light on this?

Cheers

Peter
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Reply By: Member No 1- Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 07:44

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 07:44
firstly...its capacity is 136litres...without partition
not sure if you know but the bd35 is a variable speed compressor. The faster it spins the more capacity it can do. Of course the condenser and evap coils must also be matched to suit the increased capacities.

but i have NFI if the compressor at full speed can do the duty?...it needs to be calculated and not knowing tech data of insulation properties, required duty etc etc i cannot say .....

I am of the belief that bd35 is used in the current models up to around 100.....so it may do the extra legs

I note that its a waeco...which does not seem to be mentioned on the waeco site. However looking at the waeco site they use BD35 in the domestic style fridges up to 160litres....taking into account waeco reputaion i would say the bd35 doing 145litres may be ok.....but its also probably nearly all fridge with a little freezer compartment, or all fridge...not like the others...either fridge or freezer ( which might explain its removable partition)

who the **** is Nudie:)
AnswerID: 180766

Follow Up By: techo2oz - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 09:10

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 09:10
Thanks Member Number 1,

I had to re-read the spec's and then as highlighted below, it only goes down to 0'. Hence would only be all fridge.

Somehow I can't imagine it being popular, just imagine luggine it in and out of the back of a fourby....

As for the handle... some of us have long memories... :-)

Cheers

Peter
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FollowupID: 437057

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 09:25

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 09:25
Duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
i read that too but it didnt sink in...duh!

well at least i was right....for a change....not saying i have ever beed wrong...but at least you lot can and must agree with me this time
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Follow Up By: Member - Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 17:48

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 17:48
Yep..... Nudie.... sorry Member No 1..... is right on the money....... also it does say it is a commercial unit for the "food transport business" as such I doubt that too many people would be lugging one in and out of their fourby! I know I wouldn't be carrying one too often!
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Reply By: Darian (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 08:26

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 08:26
Looks like its a cooler only - only goes down to 0 degrees - with good insulation, maybe that is not a big ask for the compressor.
AnswerID: 180776

Reply By: Member - andrew B (Kununurra) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 11:26

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 11:26
Yep, as others ahave already said, just a fridge, not a freezer. I have the 80 litre with the BD 50 compressor. It is also variable speed, with economy, normal and high settings, along with turbo which has the compressor running at even higher RPM than the high setting. (I have confirmed all of this scientiffically by having my ear pressed firmly against the cabinet whilst changing the settings!)

Interestingly the 80 litre has the large compressor, but an evaporator area which is probably less than the 40 litre model. Seems to work ok though. While we are talking fridges (for a change...), is there a inline amps metre available that will measure the usage over a period of time so a bit of experimentation can take place at home to find the most desired settings to get the results in temperature required?
Cheers Andrew

PS the 80 litre froze the red emperour caught in Kalumburu with ease, and it tasted great last night!
AnswerID: 180803

Follow Up By: disco1942 - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 12:35

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 12:35
There are plenty of digital meeters around that have a data output - Like HP but most require a companion computer to keep track of the results.

PeterD
PeterD
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Follow Up By: robak (QLD) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 13:26

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 13:26
Andrew,

Looks like you're looking for this.

centameter
clipsal sell them

It to connect to the main wire to the house but I'm sure it might work on any cord connected to an applience. Maybe someone can confirm this.

R
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FollowupID: 437104

Follow Up By: Longreach - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 14:31

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 14:31
These look good but I haven't been able to justify the cost myself -:

In Line Power Meters
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Follow Up By: Member No 1- Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 17:40

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 17:40
"I have confirmed all of this scientiffically by having my ear pressed firmly against the cabinet whilst changing the settings!) ".....CRAP.....thats not a scientific way of measuring........you must do it lying down with one finger of one hand inserted firmly in ones ear, the otherhand must be inoperative cos its holding a stubbie, while the other ear is pressed firmly against the compressor...this is the only true way of measuring the variable frequency pulsating noise emitted from the compressor when rotating.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 20:53

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 20:53
Was gunna correct Andrew B and point out the fatal flaw in his diagnostic technique however you manage to cut me off at the pass. l modestly remind you that the senses are more perceptive if this is done on a full bladder.

Ian
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Follow Up By: Member - andrew B (Kununurra) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 21:23

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 21:23
Thank you all for your replies. Actually it was scientific, 1 finger on my left hand was in the ear that wasn't against the fridge, the other was on the buttons of the fridge changing the settings. The stubby (of home brew dark and stormy) was on top of the fridge as both hands were occupied. Had it been in the buildup/wet season, a suitable straw would have been inserted!

Thanks Andrew
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Follow Up By: Member No 1- Thursday, Jun 29, 2006 at 07:53

Thursday, Jun 29, 2006 at 07:53
Both hands occupied but without a stubbie?...your letting us down andrew B

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