Lokka Lock-rite diff lockers

Submitted: Tuesday, Aug 14, 2001 at 00:00
ThreadID: 357 Views:11031 Replies:9 FollowUps:6
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I see a couple of notes down that there is a lokka / lockrite diff lock for sale. I did a search and didn't find much so here goes. Are there many people using them ? How do they perform compared to air lockers? Any bad points? Any good points?
It is just that it seems like the perfect solution, and everyone knows that there is no such thing.
Thanks, Andrew.
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Reply By: Cliff - Tuesday, Aug 14, 2001 at 00:00

Tuesday, Aug 14, 2001 at 00:00
Hi Andrew, you are spot on in that there is no such thing as a free lunch. All lockers ,manual or auto have different problems. My choice is the ARB air locker,you can choose when you want it in or out, also use the comp. to inflate tyres after a bit of off roading or sand work.
AnswerID: 886

Follow Up By: Andrew - Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00
Thanks for the reply. It seems that the majority of people are going for the ARB's if they are going for the manual operate types, so that seems like the choice in the manual ones, but I still wonder this. If the Lokka does the same thing ( with little or no other ramifications ) as the air operated ones, and is cheaper AND you don't have to remember to turn it on or off, where is the downside to the Lokka ???
Andrew.
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FollowupID: 255

Follow Up By: Cliff - Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00
Hey Andrew what is the best a Holden or a Ford,manual or auto, BFG's v Coopers, yada yada.
With either manual or auto lockers when they lock they LOCK.There is no difference in the perfomance of either type in the locked state. When locked they both produce severe understeer.The auto locker will engage when one wheel spins or with a hit of the go pedal, If you want to live with that as part of your daily offroading ,fine.As for getting into trouble because you have not turned on the compressor and engaged the lockers,well you should seriously consider if you should be in the bush.It really is a personal thing ,you pay your money & make your choice If the lockrite is so good why is he selling it & fitting an ARB? Cheers. Cliff. PS Have never had a problem disengageing a diff
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Reply By: Allan - Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00
Andrew, I went for the Lockrite in my part-time 4WD 80 Series and have done over 25,000kms without any problems (bearing in mind they only have to operate when the hubs are engaged). I am not aware of any downsides but I have heard they may cause more tyre wear on constant (full time) 4WD's but have never seen any hard evidence. In fact I believe the positive diff lockup with an Air locker would put more strain on the drive train in firm conditions. The Lockrite's certainly are a lot cheaper and simpler. An Air locka might give you the opportunity to turn on only when you need it but its not much use if you are stuck up to the axles before engaging. I'll stick with the Lockrite as it's automatic and works when you need it. It will be interesting to see other comments.
Regards
Allan
AnswerID: 890

Follow Up By: Andrew - Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00
I have heard that you can't put them on the full time ones until you make them part time ??? Not sure about that - being the mechanical dunce that I am.
I am also with you on the automatic side of things and the " Oh bugger, I should have turned on the lokkers" type scenario.

I wait with anticipation on some other responses.

Andrew.
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FollowupID: 256

Reply By: Will - Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00
Andrew,
I am the one who posted the note and I have one for sale.
I have now tried both air locker and lockrite in my GU patrol (front).
THe air locker has like the other guy said the advantage you can turn it on and off.
The lockrite has the advantage that is "proactive", ie: too late if you are stuck up a rut....
The other benefit of the lockrite is that if you are going up a very slippery rutted track and there is a need to turn on a switchback you just turn and the lockrite disengages as you turn (tested).
The air locker will NOT disengage at all and you will have to remember to turn it off and then it may be under load and it may not unlock...
The only one minus I found with the lockright is that on a long dessert trip if you are in 4wd it adds little pressure on the steering (gets heavier as you turn) ona straight line no problems.
AnswerID: 892

Reply By: will - Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00
Andrew,
In answere to the other question, there seems to be a 40% of people using lockrights, more and more guys are now using them on competitions because they don't have to worry about turning them on/off they are (proactive), I have four friends with GQ'a and GUs who have them and had them for years on the GQ and had no problems.
I am planning to do up a GQ shorty for competition and that is why I went to the air locker on my GU. I am not in a harry to get rid of it but if someone interested comes along I will get rid of it.
AnswerID: 893

Follow Up By: Andrew - Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00
Will,
Thanks for both of the replies. I don't have a 4WD that I can use them in at the moment ( I have a Forrester ) but am planning on getting a 78 series troopy at the end of the year. So once again, thanks for the replies.

Andrew.
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FollowupID: 257

Reply By: Tony- Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 15, 2001 at 00:00
Andrew, I have a Lock Right on the front of my part time 80 and I love it! No real draw backs that I have found. As far as heavier steering goes - my lady's falcon has heavier steering. Today I drove a VT Commodore ute (work vehicle) with power steer and I was supprised to find the Commodores' power steering has heavier 'return to centre' than my 80 series when in 4wd. Also, if you turn the air locker off to turn a corner,(assuming front diff here) then you have the equivalent off an open diff, which we all know can end up giving you no wheels driving (front axle). The lock right will *always* have a least one wheel driving and that is the one with the traction. I bought mine before the price rise in June/July. I believe they are over $1000 at TJM. Could be worth buying from the USA. Very easy to fit by a home mechanic, I fitted mine.
AnswerID: 903

Follow Up By: Andrew - Thursday, Aug 16, 2001 at 00:00

Thursday, Aug 16, 2001 at 00:00
Thanks Tony, I am pretty sure that I am sold on the idea now.

Andrew.
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FollowupID: 260

Reply By: Noel - Friday, Aug 17, 2001 at 00:00

Friday, Aug 17, 2001 at 00:00
Andrew - Have just fitted a Lock-rite to my Jackaroo T/D and would agree that they are fairly easy to fit, cause slightly heavier steering when turning and much improved traction. Try www.4wdsystems.com.au for prices. Regards, Noel
AnswerID: 920

Follow Up By: Andrew - Sunday, Aug 26, 2001 at 00:00

Sunday, Aug 26, 2001 at 00:00
Thanks for the reply Noel.

Andrew
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FollowupID: 282

Reply By: Cairns Offroad Training & Tours - Saturday, Aug 18, 2001 at 00:00

Saturday, Aug 18, 2001 at 00:00
Is it viable to put a Lokka in a constant 4wd 80 series? Will the center diff compensate for this?
I have heard lots of conflicting reports on this.
Has anyone actually tried it?
Cheers Rob


AnswerID: 921

Reply By: Will - Saturday, Aug 18, 2001 at 00:00

Saturday, Aug 18, 2001 at 00:00
I once met a guy along a firetrail who was driving a LR discovery (full time 4wd) and he has one on the front, he said he had installed it some years ago and never had any problems
AnswerID: 927

Reply By: Dion - Tuesday, Oct 02, 2001 at 00:00

Tuesday, Oct 02, 2001 at 00:00
I have just last week has a Lokka fitted to the front diff in my Rodeo, and with only one weekend away with it, are very happy with it's performance. I were at Dorado Downs - Geranium on a club trip. The Rodeo got a sensible caning within my limitations, and didn't let me down. There were a couple of hills that defeated me, and many others. On those two hills, all the traction in the world won't help you, you need pace. The sand was just too soft. I am really looking forward to trying it out in the mud. Cheers, Dion.
AnswerID: 1155

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