Bush winch

Submitted: Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:04
ThreadID: 42450 Views:2524 Replies:11 FollowUps:10
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Interesting product:

www.bushwinch.com.au/index.html
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Reply By: Andrew from Vivid Adventures - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:19

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:19
Nice idea ... but has anyone used them in anger?
AnswerID: 222478

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:42

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:42
The US Army (amongst others) has been espousing this idea for a long time:

https://atiam.train.army.mil/soldierPortal/atia/adlsc/view/public/10920-1/fm/21-305/Ch22.htm#top
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Follow Up By: chips59 - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:45

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:45
tried them in the army years ago, problem was it would pull the land rover sideways to which ever side it was pulling from. we bolted an eye or d link to front on each side to guide cable through with some success. we also tried a similar setup but with a offset leg to lift the wheel up as it come round, but to heavy on the foot and you broke the arm or the studs.
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:52

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:52
>but to heavy on the foot and you broke the arm or the studs

Good point!

I'm no mechanical engineer but it seems to me you would have the whole mass of the vehicle plus the additional energy required to overcome the "stuckness" forces being transferred through the wheel nuts! And they are not designed to handle that.

That's a bit different to the US Army system.

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:52

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 16:52
I should have said "wheel studs"
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Follow Up By: V8 Troopie - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 20:39

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 20:39
"And they are not designed to handle that. "

Why not Mike H. ?
When one locks the diff similar forces load the wheel studs with the added leverage of the tyre.
If the forces from the smaller winch drum can't be handled by the wheel studs then fitting lockers would also be detrimental.
After all, the power from the motor is the same.
Klaus
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 20:43

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 20:43
Four wheels against two? But I see where you're coming from.
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Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Kerry W (QLD) - Monday, Feb 19, 2007 at 01:41

Monday, Feb 19, 2007 at 01:41
Its similar to the Joey (but simpler) You just cant add an extra wheel onto the winch and offset the wheel like you can with the Joey. Joeys have been around a while, were manufactured in the Late 80s early 90s -
The winch part works best under ideal conditions, ie straight line. They do get a bit muddy to put back in the vehicle after a bog, and work best with difflocks or good LSDs (see pics of joeys in My Rig pics Gallery)
There are a few options nowdays.

cheers
Kerry W

Kerry W (Qld)
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FollowupID: 483419

Reply By: Gob & Denny - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 17:59

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 17:59
the idea has been around for a long time with a second rim welded on and used as a windlass or like on a yaght where they just take a couple of turnd and guide it along

had ideas myself instead of a winch have an old tyre on a rim with a second rim welded on probably gets a bit messy changing wheels but does a similar job

steve
and if you were really stuck out bush take a tyre off and just use 1 rim on car
AnswerID: 222491

Reply By: Member - Hughesy (SA) - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:03

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:03
I'm not doubting the tool works but they show a pretty weak example in the video. I thought it would be good when they showed the cruiser bogged in that soft sand but then the clip goes to a vehicle driving up a rocky slope and the roap actually looks like it has very little tension in it........

Show some more realistic bog situations and I'd have a serious look at it.

The free alternative to it (I haven't tried it) is to just use a winch extension strap (one end anchored of course) and place it under a front tyre and wrap around over the top until the end is between the tyre and the strap and then drive out. Exact same principle and doesn't put any side load on the wheel nuts....Air pressure in tyre will obviously affect its efficiency.

Has anyone actually tried this method???
AnswerID: 222492

Reply By: garrycol - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:05

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:05
This idea has been around forever but the first time I have seen one actually made for sale.
AnswerID: 222493

Reply By: Exploder - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:24

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:24
Yeah Ok, But wouldn't you would need a locked diff or at the very least a strong LSD for it to actually work as the tyre on the other side of the axle (least traction) would just Spin leaving the winching tyre doing nothing.
AnswerID: 222498

Follow Up By: Andrew from Vivid Adventures - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:48

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:48
That was my first thought, but then I realised that each wheel would have equal resistance forces being applied to it, but I'm not sure that it is going to stay that way - once the vehicle angle changes, that is.
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Follow Up By: F4Phantom - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 19:51

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 19:51
the wheel with the least slack will turn first untill the ropes are even the it will pull evenly. even if the car changes angle and a little slack is opened at one side the open diff will take it up instantly and the car will pull evenly again. I think its a great idea.
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Reply By: 3F62 - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:45

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 18:45
We made one years ago one wet day in the shed when i worked on a farm from a 10'' mini wheel to fit our old toyota stout...... found we needed a guide mounted of the side of the front bumper for the rope to pass through as without this it pulled the ute sideways until the rope slipped of the hub.......
AnswerID: 222505

Reply By: disco driver - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 19:00

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 19:00
Has anyone looked at/listened to the videos??
Commentary says that you use one on each side to get an even pull.

As others have said, the idea has been around for ages but this is the first I've seen actually manufactured for sale.

The Army tried a similar idea back in the early 50's using large pulleys bolted onto all 4 wheels and cables to cross ravines and gullies. It worked but was a bit hairy.

Disco
AnswerID: 222510

Reply By: David from David and Justine Olsen's 4WD Tag-Along - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 20:07

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 20:07
The Ford Blitz trucks during the war had something similar. I know a guy who has used them and swears by them but never tried it myself
AnswerID: 222526

Reply By: Jimbo - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 20:59

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 20:59
$885 for what is essentially.......

A couple of small rims, 24 modified wheels nuts and some rope.

Sounds a bit rich to me.

Still, if it works it does sound a lot better than $500 on a hand winch.
AnswerID: 222545

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 22:08

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 22:08
for that price, why wouldnt you buy a Warn winch? Im sorta lost why its such a "GREAT" idea as others are saying....
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Reply By: Willem - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 22:02

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 22:02
A bloke I know in Darwin made one for his LC HJ45 ute.

We purposely bogged the ute one day to test the theory and it worked quite well off the front wheels.

I wouldn't want to be around if anything went pearshaped whilst winching forward from the rear wheels
AnswerID: 222567

Reply By: DIO - Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 23:21

Sunday, Feb 18, 2007 at 23:21
As stated by several others, this idea has been around for a long time. I actually have a detailed plan and instructions of how to manufacture your own. It was called the Budget Winch and the article I have is one thatI copied from an Overlander magazine back in 1981. If anyone is interested I would be happy to provide copies.
AnswerID: 222589

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