PROSPECTORS ESCAPE THE GREAT SANDY

Submitted: Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 13:43
ThreadID: 44328 Views:3726 Replies:12 FollowUps:39
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Two professional prospectors planned to drive into the Great Sandy Desert east of Sandfire . Two vehicles , but one failed at the start and not being affluent they elected to go in one . Vehicle of choice , and compulsion , was a fully rebuilt Series Two Landrover . Started four days ago at two o'clock in the morning by helping by fight the fire which burnt down Sandfire Roadhouse . Four o'clock , helped fight the second flare up . At dawn went north and then east . For two and a half days they ' bush bashed ' along an very overgrown track . At 60km intervals they dropped water in case they had to walk out . 11 o'clock yesterday , had a tea break then started east again . After 5 km , accumulated seeds and brush under the vehicle caught fire . Out of the vehicle and started to fight the fire . Fire took hold , set fire to the scrub and rapidly started to consume the vehicle . They went into the fire and recovered the satphone . No burns , but lungs full of toxic smoke from plastic jerry cans . The scrub fire takes off but a light breeze sends it away in one direction . No water , food or shelter . Vehicle rescue about threedays away .

Satphone to Hedland police and discussed the problem . Police Airwing in Perth were involved because they have the purse for air rescues . Planning processes took a couple of hours and at 2 o'clock the Port Hedland Port Authority helicopter was tasked . Already , daylight was a problem . Telfer , refuel at the mine , and then north to the area and out via Sandfire was considered , but search time would be very limited and it would be dark in the search area . Best option seemed to be to truck fuel in drums to Sandfire and work from there early next day . Police then raised concerns about the health of the prospectors and their ability to survive the night without risk of deteriorating. Decision was to position the helicopter at Sandfire , truck fuel in , and procede at night . This would require an old and silly pilot so I was selected . On arriving at what was left of Sandfire , at sunset , two drums of jet fuel were found .After topping up the helicopter I headed east with one policeman . Next problem was headwinds . We were going to arrive at the search area with virtually no fuel to spare . Nice and dark over the Great Sandy so we spotted the bush fire 40 miles out . Arriving , there was about 40 major flare ups and many more small fires . We picked what seemed the most upwind fire and landed . On the satphone , the prospectors reported we were some distance from them , but were a bit hazy about direction . The policeman went off on foot in the most likely direction climbing some big sand hills as he went . When he returned and after more talk on the satphone we concluded they were at a miniscule isolated spotfire about 10km further upwind . Fuel reserves indicated only a quick look was possible . Approaching the light we could see dancing men . Trying to land short raised an ash cloud , two hopscotches raised more ash , so it was over the fire and we found clean air for a landing . The policeman retrieved the prospectors and bundled them into the back seats . Plenty of stars to indicate a good take off direction and were soon on the way home . Fuel remained critical all the way to Sandfire , and , arriving with minimum fuel Sandfire was blacked out [ well it had burnt down ] . Landed next to the highway using light from a roadtrain and whistled up SES with our fuel . The Sandfire ambulance attended but the prospectors were OK , and were happy to settle at Sandfire . Sandfire to Port Hedland with a nice tail wind and on the ground at 0130HRS . Six hours fifty five minutes flight time .

The prospectors were debriefed by the police and there was no criticsm of their actions . Nice blokes , very good [ older ] bushmen . Up to the point of the fire they were fully equipped with HF , EPIRB and camping gear . Illustrates yet again that emergencies can leave you with nothing but what is on your body , or what is in your grab bag . Another lesson learned , water in steel jerrycans is better than water in plastic .
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Reply By: Bilbo - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 13:59

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 13:59
Thanks Rotord.

A good descriptiopn of the event and a very timely reminder for me. I'm a prospector and I'll be in that area around Nullagine and Marble Bar etc in a few weeks.

It proves even experienced folks can get caught out.

Perhaps the first thing to do in a vehicle fire is get some water out to a safe upowind, distance rather than lose the lot.

It was a bit ominous that they left water on the side of the track "in case they had to walk out". It s a good idea - but in thier case it was a "portent of doom". 60 kms is a long walk without water and under stress.

Thanks Rotord,

Bilbo
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Follow Up By: Member - Rotord - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:07

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:07
Hello Bilbo

The water stashing is interesting . I think the rational is that they shoot for the cooking pot and therefore are often away from the vehicle with a rifle .If the vehicle was lost , with a rifle , a box of matches and the water stashes they could eventually walk out . A pocket sized EPIRB would be a better solution , but the new 406 beacons aren't pocket sized .
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Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 17:52

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 17:52
Hey Bilbo , I'm going on a 14 day fossicking trip with Coiltek out of Marble Bar on June 30 .

Are you prospecting as a professional for a company or just for yourself ?

I am really looking forward to learning a bit about this .

Willie .
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Nullagine) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:56

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:56
sometimes the most experienced are the worst prepared. came accross an old prospector from wayback on the Neman Nully road. He had had 2 puntures, no repair gear, running 6 ply15 inch wheels, didnt have proper jack handles and his second spare was a 16 inch. He wasnt far out of Nully so wehelped him change the tyreand told him he should be able to get tyres fixed in Nully and sort of hinted if he wasnt going to get better prepared he would be better of going home
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Follow Up By: Bilbo - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 23:35

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 23:35
Davoe,

I hear you're no longer in Nullagine? But is 'Paddy the car repairer" still in Nullagine? Gawd, that guy could certainly rip off the tourists! A real card he was!

Bilbo
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Follow Up By: Bilbo - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 23:46

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 23:46
Willie,

I've been a gold prospector as a hobby for 20 years - off & on. I did it for living for 3 years after I got out of the oil & gas game in 1996. Plus I ran my own business as a Gold Tour Guide - until "September 11", when everyone stopped flying in to "Oz" and anywhere else! 13 international cancellations in 10 days!! I went back to oil & gas so I could retire comfortably.

Now I'm fully retired, I do it for relaxation,,,,,,????!!!???? - plus my wife has "gold fever",,,,,,,,

Coiltek run good tours from what I hear. They contacted me about 18 months ago to work for them as a guide. I said no, I've had enough of it.

You'll learn heaps off those guys. They've been doing it for years.

You'll also learn about patience, a sore back, frustration and how to jump on yer hat in rage!!

It's a great game is bippin',,,,,,,,,,,,if ya can stop yerself from going mad,,,,,,,,,,,

If all goes to plan, I should be up Marble Bar way myself in June. Look for the red Chevissan and a small Supreme Getaway Offroader van.

Good luck and I hope you find some.

Bilbo
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Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 08:54

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 08:54
Bilbo,
I will keep an watch out for you . I will be in a silver 100 Series with lots of crap hanging off it .
Cheers ,
Willie .
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Nullagine) - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 08:58

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 08:58
we wernt allowed to go to town much but havnt heard of him. AFAIK the only garage in town is the roadhouse
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Reply By: Bat - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 14:46

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 14:46
Bad choice of vehicles.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 14:59

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 14:59
Why?
Don't Japanese 4WDs collect grass & seeds & catch fire?
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Follow Up By: Member - Lionel A (WA) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:22

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:22
Probably find LR was poking around up that way while the Japanese were still recovering from their big BBQ in 1945....lol;

Poms and Yanks are great at inventing new technology but the Japanese are great at improving it.

Lionel.

What this has to do with this post Im not sure, but I'll press the go button anyway. lol;
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Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:09

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:09
There is a 2006 Toyota Prado burnt out 3km south of Georgia Bore. They burn just as well as anything else. I have a lovely molten piece of Toyota engine which I keep on my mantlepiece. :-)
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Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:39

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:39
So you can dream about one day owning one ?
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Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:45

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:45
No, to remind me never to buy one of those overpriced rust buckets.
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Follow Up By: Andrew from Vivid Adventures - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:46

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:46
come on willem... are you comparing it to your priceless rustbucket? I know Jeddah does love it, but you can't even hotwire it - well not quickly anyways ;-) What are you going to do when you're stuck more than walking distance from Hall's Creek?
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Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:53

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:53
I will think of something
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Reply By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:02

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:02
Good on yer Rotard, you took a bit of a risk yourself in order to help them.

They sound like they knew what they were doing but accidents and unanticipated events may happen no matter how careful one has been - otherwise we wouldn't need to buy EPIRBs, would we?

Well done and thanks - 'cause next time it might be me?

Mike Harding

PS. Didn't they have a GPS and could provide exact co-ordinates?

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Follow Up By: Member - Rotord - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:13

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:13
Hello Mike .

The GPS went up in the fire , but they were able to give a distance from Sandfire accurate to about 20km and that gave a cross track reference along the old marked road .
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Reply By: Motherhen - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:10

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:10
Lucky they could get the Sat phone out - maybe not safe to get GSP as well.
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

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AnswerID: 233541

Reply By: Smudger - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:17

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:17
Great yarn Rotord. The old Landy was born without a Cat Converter. Today the risk of car fires is very real when you're heading across country, or along overgrown tracks. A lot of people don't realise that clearing collected grass from under the skirts should be regular routine.
Would I go bush without a sat-phone? No bloody way!

Smudger
PS: I reckon anyone who flies a helicopter is silly, you're luck that you're old mate.
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Reply By: Richard Kovac - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:29

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 15:29
Good to hear everything is OK.

But I fail to see where the emergency was, (I know you din not say that) but
why risk your life and a police mans life for two blokes that had good coms. and were OK. Old bushy should be able to last one night in the bush this time of year?

have I read this wrong or did the helicopter fly 402km east to Telfer , refuel at the mine, then 245km north to sandfire where Port hedland to sandfire is only 265km?

Why didn't a ground crew go in next day again it's not like these guys did not know what they were doing and with good coms. they could tell there rescuers how they are and all is Ok, getting wores ect. It's not like they hit the EPIRB and you where going in blind.

Sorry but I must be missing something

Regards

Richard

P.s. I sure you are posting it as info only, but I had to ask the questions
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Follow Up By: timglobal - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 16:29

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 16:29
A lungful of acrid smoke retrieving Satphone etc, shock of vehicle fire with accompanying loss of kit, compounded by apparent nearby bushfire would push them up in the urgency stakes?

Tim
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Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:00

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:00
I think that you read the helicopter bit wrong, Richard.

Imagine it was you. You are now stuck in the desert. No water, no food, minimal clothes and a 60km walk back to civilisation. I think an immediate rescue was in order.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:33

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:33
Hi Willem

I may have read the chopper bit wrong (maybe)

But "Imagine it was you. You are now stuck in the desert. No water, no food, minimal clothes and a 60km walk back to civilisation. I think an immediate rescue was in order."

I would not like to put another person life in danger for myself my wife or my dog.... but hay that's me..

Just reading the story I could not see the reason to travel in at night (silly pilot) or not, the men seemed to do OK for over 12 hours..

just seems a but gunho to me But then again I'm wrong most of the time..LOL

Just reread the flight planes and see I got that wrong allso

Regards

Richard
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Reply By: Footloose - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 16:23

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 16:23
Thanks for posting here. I know that area a little, and can only imagine what it would have been like. Sandfire burnt down ? Crikey ! Thats a pity.
As posted, thanks for stepping up to the plate, and reporting the situation here.

AnswerID: 233556

Reply By: Bilbo - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 16:35

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 16:35
Yeah, Sandfire burning down was in the paper last week. I'll be leaving Marble Bar after doing some "bippin" around there and was planning taking the boreline track past Bamoboo Creek and refueling at Sandfire before moving on to Kununarra. I'll have to have a rethink on fueling up,,,,,,,,,

How far from Talga Talga to the next fuel stop? Broome?

"Pass me the maps please, nurse,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"

Bilbo
AnswerID: 233560

Follow Up By: Topcat (WA) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 17:50

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 17:50
Hi Bilbo, depending on what your fuel range is from Marble Bar to Broome via the boreline track is just under 550km. I've done it plenty of times with a top up at Marble Bar in my troopy with the 6.5 chevy just on my main tank (90 ltrs) carrying a full load without using my L.R. tank. Then again it all depends on what sort of head wind there is on the Great Northern highway. Cheers
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Follow Up By: Topcat (WA) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:03

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:03
Correction to distance. Should be 575km not 550km. Cheers
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Follow Up By: Bilbo - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:29

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 20:29
Thanks Topcat,

I just had a squizzy at the maps and I could come out of the track before Pardoo Roadhouse, instead of after it.

Is Pardoo R/H still open?

Bilbo
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Follow Up By: Topcat (WA) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 21:57

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 21:57
It was the last time I went through there 12months back.
Phone no. is (08) 91764916 open from 6am to 10pm. 7 days a week as far as I know.
Cheers
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Reply By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 17:48

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 17:48
Great job and great Post Rotored . It makes me wonder what I could salvage in such a sudden emergency . I will give more thought to where I place the more vital bits and pieces .
Thanks ,
Willie .
AnswerID: 233578

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:02

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:02
Do a "grab bag" Willie. A robust bag (canvas tool bags are good) into which you can put a basic survival kit, food and water (4lt wine bladder is good for water). This book will give you details of things to carry:

Site Link

Ensure the grab bag is _always_ stored in the same handy place in the vehicle so that if the worst happen you know exactly where it is.

Anyone who goes serious bush in Oz should read this book - mine comes with me on each journey.

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:11

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:11
Emergency gear bag is a good idea Mike .
Will do . Thanks ,
Willie .
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Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:55

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:55
Last time I saw your truck Willie is was chokkas. Would you find the grab bag in that mayhem...lol
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Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:41

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 19:41
Maybe I could tie it onto the windscreen wiper .
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Reply By: Willem - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:50

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 18:50
Thanks for that insight, Rotord and good on you for rescuing them.

One never knows when things could go pearshaped in the bush. Vigilance of everything around you is paramount and grass from beneath the vehicle must be constantly looked at.

I presume the prospectors were out along the old Anna Plains Station desert access track. Somewhere I had planned to go some day.

Cheers
AnswerID: 233593

Reply By: Member - Rotord - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 23:05

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 23:05
I should have mentioned , Sandfire is still selling fuel . No EFTPOS so cash only . I hope people support them by buying fuel as they are great outback characters and are especially helpfull when good advice on bush travel is needed .
AnswerID: 233672

Follow Up By: Bilbo - Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 23:48

Sunday, Apr 15, 2007 at 23:48
That's a big help, Rotord. Thanks mate.

Saves me doubling back a bit.

Bilbo
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Reply By: Bilbo - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 00:03

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 00:03
What I can't understand about these prospectors is why they were in The Great Sandy - EAST of Sandfire. Geologically speaking there's nothing out there that a "surface prospector" could pick up. It's a dead, deep, sandy hole. No outcrops, nothing.

Uranium perhaps?

Odd?

Bilbo
AnswerID: 233680

Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 00:36

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 00:36
All seems a bit strange to me

I was thinking the same thing, not much out that way, what was so important to leave one Vehicle????

Sounds like a good story, I can not fine any other references to it on the web or have not read anything about it in the papers,, Tax payers money you would thing someone would have had a whinge about it ..LOL

a bit of the twilight zone maybe :-)

Richard

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Follow Up By: Member - Lionel A (WA) - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 08:01

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 08:01
Maybe seeking God!!!!!

Lionel.
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Follow Up By: Willem - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 08:39

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 08:39
Hi Bilbo

While trekking along the Kidman last year we came across some fresh bulldozer works on the north side of the track about 100km east of the Great North West Hwy. We pulled in to an opening on that track for a morning cuppa. Soon after a Landcruiser ute bore down on us along this new scrape. It was a friendly couple of geosurvey blokes working for Newcrest Mining. They were putting a track in for some seismic work about 40-60km north of the Kidman which is in the general area where those prospectors were.

I know that mechanical gold mining can pick up specks of gold the eye cannot see but Newcrest wouldn't be out there for nothing. The blokes told us that there was a strong possibility of good gold finds in the area. Maybe it was wishful thinking but as you would know, there is gold throughout this vast land.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Bilbo - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 09:35

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 09:35
Willem,

That spot is a long way from Telfer! But the discovery of Telfer was an odd strory in itself. Newcrest will tell you that a geologist found it, but I know different. I had the good fortune to do some of the research on a book called," The Golden Rule" written by Bob Sheppard, a well known WA prospector. Telfer was found as an isolated one-off rock dome way out in the Great Sandy in 1971, by a crazy fenech guy by the name of Jean-Paul Turcaud. It's strory of daring, misplaced innocence, swindle and politics at senior govt level.

However, I digress.

That "coastal section" of the Great Sandy is barren for prospectivity and it's long way from there to the more rocky area of Telfer,,,,,,,,,,and there are easier ways to get to the Telfer area than going cross country in that stuff! There's a world of difference between the type of prospecting that small timers like me do and the sub-surface stuff that companies like Newcrest do.

I wonder where they were going?

Remember what that character who shot Peter Falconio was doing at the time? Running drugs from the Eastern States to the North West, Broome and the Kimberleys by using desert tracks,,,,,,,,,,it was his regular run. But let's not read anything into this eh? There's all sorts of "funny stuff" going on out there all the time.

I don't know of one prospector that uses or would use older Landrovers these days. Not one. In fact I don't of any that use modern Landrovers!! They all use Nissans & Toyotas with the odd Mitsi thrown in.

Curiouser 'n curiouser,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Bilbo
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Follow Up By: Willem - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 09:59

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 09:59
Bilbo

They must've been along the old Anna Plains Station track heading east. Access to Dragon Tree Soak Conservation Reserve could be made from that track.( Maybe there is a natural crop growing out there. I have studied the maps of the area and was going to make a sortee in there last year but had to abandon the plans as we could not get fuel at Punmu as the whole community had gone walkabout. I am still intersted in going in to that country and am planning a trip there next year.

Yes, the old Landrover thing gets me too. Having owned a few I can vouch that they are not all that comfortable out bush although rugged enough. Still, with the probability of breaking an axle(and the old Landy's were prone to that) I certainly would not venture into that inhospitable country. Changing tyres on one rim steels also does not bring forth joy...lol

It is also interesting that in 2005 those two fellas who died out on the Talawana Track, were also driving a Landrover

Yes, curious indeed................

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - sparra - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 10:34

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 10:34
g'day willem, those dozer tracks you seen on the kidson were probably the access track into the anketell hills area, i know newcrest had a lease around there.[i used to work for them at telfer] cheers sparra.
no good being the richest man in the cemetry

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Follow Up By: Member - Rotord - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 13:05

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 13:05
Hello All

You blokes are a bit off track . The policeman and I were also interested in all the circumstances , and my suggestion was first we check to see if one of them is Tony Mokbel , then we consider drugs . I had a good yarn with them as we waited for our SES fuel . They are genuine professional prospectors , their details were verified by the police and I have no doubt that the people from Sandfire would give them a reference . They have good reason to go where they did . They are battlers . Shure they would like to travel in a convoy of new Toyotas , but they don't have the money . Given that they are onto something , they have to travel how they can . The Series Two was fully rebuilt and was doing the job OK up to the point where it burnt . Yes the Series Two breaks axles , thats why the Army carried spare axles , and they considered that the axles protected every other item in the transmission train . You can change a Series Two Axle in 45 minutes . Where they were going is their business and I have been deliberately vague about the location to protect their interests . Been thinking that I should offer to bankroll their next trip . $10,000 for a 1% share could be a good speculative deal .
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Follow Up By: Bilbo - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 13:49

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 13:49
Rotord,

In that case I stand humbled and corrected.

Bilbo
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Follow Up By: Willem - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 18:00

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 18:00
Thanks Rotord

Another Lasseters Reef coming up.....lol
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 21:37

Monday, Apr 16, 2007 at 21:37
I don't know I still don't get it.... :-(
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Follow Up By: Willem - Tuesday, Apr 17, 2007 at 06:28

Tuesday, Apr 17, 2007 at 06:28
Methinks you've lost the plot too. Have a look around your room, maybe you will find it again....lol
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Tuesday, Apr 17, 2007 at 21:06

Tuesday, Apr 17, 2007 at 21:06
No.

;-)
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