Fresh vegetables and no fridge?

Submitted: Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 21:48
ThreadID: 46244 Views:7779 Replies:9 FollowUps:13
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We have planned a four week trip to the outback Birdsville and Hay river back via Alice Springs in August. However we don't have a fridge any suggestions on how to keep vegetables fresh for as long as possible. Any ideas welcome. Roystons other half.
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Reply By: Willem - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 21:52

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 21:52
Wrap all vegetables up in two or three sheets of newspaper. They keep a while then. Carry the wrapped vegies in banana boxes.

For more info go to Topics above. There's heaps of good camping tips.

Cheers
AnswerID: 244525

Follow Up By: Member - Jeff H (QLD) - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:31

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:31
Banana Boxes!
BANANA BOXES!!
Do you get your fresh produce from the check-point Willem?
Jeff H.
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FollowupID: 505542

Follow Up By: Willem - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 05:19

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 05:19
Now thats an idea !

Yer full of bright ideas, Jeff!!!

Cheers
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FollowupID: 505552

Reply By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 21:56

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 21:56
Buy a fridge or....

Long long ago.... I used styrafoam boxes, ice and newspaper. (Good for 4 to 5 days)

You will be traveling in winter so easily done.

I will be there for the races and might see you.

Speaking to my customers over the last few weeks it seems 1 in 3 will be at the races this year.

Regards

Derek.
AnswerID: 244526

Reply By: DIO - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 21:58

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 21:58
You could also consider tinned vegs or dried/dehydrated (from camping stores). Vegs, such as potatoes, pumpkin, carrots, sweet corn, etc will keep a while if stored in dark and packed to avoid bruising/crushing.
AnswerID: 244527

Follow Up By: Member - Jeff H (QLD) - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:12

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:12
Dear Dio or D10, (I'm not sure which),
I get the feeling that you are Really trying to help people.
As you don't appear as a member on my screen, it seems that I have no way to contact you privately.
Perhaps you could go through the Moderator: alternatively, you could post an address. (I wouldn't do that. But that's just me).
I wouldn't do what Alan Bond has allegedly done recently either...
D10....Talk to me.
May your God keep you safe D10. Jeff H.
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FollowupID: 505534

Follow Up By: Member - Jeff H (QLD) - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:26

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:26
Dear Dio or D10, (I'm not sure which),
I get the feeling that you are Really trying to help people.
As you don't appear as a member on my screen, it seems that I have no way to contact you privately.
Perhaps you could go through the Moderator: alternatively, you could post an address. (I wouldn't do that. But that's just me).
..... I wouldn't do what Alan Bond has allegedly done recently either...
D10....Talk to me.
May your God keep you safe D10. Jeff H.

ps. perhaps an outline of your sandy tracks ventures would do just fine. jh.
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FollowupID: 505541

Reply By: Member - Warren W (SA) - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 22:15

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 22:15
Follow suggestion #1 above. Carrots go a bit limp but still OK and all other vegies are OK. Alternatively there are storage bags in supermarkets - light green - which are very good as well. Store in banana boxes as suggested - good size and freely available.
AnswerID: 244531

Reply By: Member - Jeff H (QLD) - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 22:20

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 22:20
Support Willem's comment,but after that, don't be afraid to check the soft- pack "Stir fry Vegies" [ Edgell, in this case.] Long life. no peeling, and, unless there is a D10 blocking the road,no quarantine problems.
We carry both a wok and a baby camp oven, and The Boss hasn't been game to complain re packaged vegies yet. (Dammit: why won't She cook, just for a change!!).
Safe travels Royston.Damn good country, eh. Enjoy an hang loose. Jeff.

ps. seniors moment: does one peel an orange or a bell, or should I just engauge 'spellcheque' ? jh.
AnswerID: 244533

Follow Up By: Member - Au-2 - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:21

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:21
A bell peals, but do not ask for whom the bell tolls . . .

OzeSheila.
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FollowupID: 505539

Follow Up By: Willem - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 05:18

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 05:18
Or the Bell Ringer, who fell from the Church Tower and was killed after being hit in the face by the bell.

A passer-by asked "Who was he?'

"Dunno" replied the Parish Priest, "But his face rings a bell"............

LOL

Cheers
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FollowupID: 505551

Reply By: Member - joc45 (WA) - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:12

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:12
Yep, the newspaper trick works well, as it absorbs the moisture sweated by the veges. Tomatoes keep for up to a week this way. Cabbage keeps very well, but the outer leaves go a bit yellow - discard them, and it gets a bit smelly after a while, so rinse it before using. Carrots keep well, and even lettuces have kept up to a week with only a few dud leaves. Spuds keep very well in a cloth sack, but make sure they are kept in the dark as well as cool, and even the continental cucumbers keep well. And onions.
Just make sure you keep the stuff relatively cool, like in an esky with no ice, or a styrofoam box and in the shade. If camped near water, drape a wet towel over the esky to keep it cooler. Make sure the drain hole on the esky is closed, as I found blowies would get in.
I use the freeze-dried beans and peas for good green stuff, which reconstitute well. And of course, a pack of instant mash is always good.
A great quick meal needing no refrigeration is a tin of tuna/salmon, with chopped onions and instant mash made into patties and fried.
Check the cooking tips on this site.
Gerry
AnswerID: 244546

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:32

Sunday, Jun 03, 2007 at 23:32
All my early trips were without a fridge. When you travel in the desert in August, the nights get down to below freezing. So we'd fill an esky in the evening, leave it open in the vehicle, and slip the lid on in the morning, so stuff will stay cold during the day. A brocolli box was pretty useful as a cheap esky.

We also wrap most our vegetables in newspaper and put them in a cardboard box.
But also take tinned peas, corn and mushrooms.
AnswerID: 244551

Follow Up By: long haired nomad - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 03:28

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 03:28
FRom what state are you travelling from. Dont forget fruit fly stations on the NSW border. And from experience they WILL confiscate banana boxes.
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FollowupID: 505549

Follow Up By: Willem - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 05:12

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 05:12
LHN

If you look above you will see that PhilG is from South Australia hence (SA)

We know all about Fruitfly Inspection Points, having no less than 5 here in SA.

Access to the deserts however does not need passing through a Fruitfly Inspection Station to the East, North or West.
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FollowupID: 505550

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 10:45

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 10:45
Yep, Royston's other half is taking Royston into NT via Qld, so quarantine is not an issue. If they are entering SA via Innamincka, then common sense prevails.
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FollowupID: 505591

Reply By: Robin Miller - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 08:25

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 08:25
Hi Roystons other half

My other half and I have do this a bit even though we have a fridge and good management and some of above suggestions like wrapping in paper, keep in cardboard boxes , keep out of heat (back of wagon all day is bad news) are great and week is not usually a problem.

Choosing tough vegtables like cabbage and carrots are great for quick Coleslaw and do last.

Just use A4 office paper lided boxes here as they are stackable and easily labelled
and small size means you tend to be able to carry more vegies per unit area that aren't touching each other.

We extend the process to sliced bread , and a key is reducing the oxygen to the food, which along with sweating from plastic bags are main reason it goes off.

In case of sliced bread just suck out air such that sides of bag go visibly in and try off end with rubber band etc and this will cause it to last twice as long.

Tried green bags , but didn't help much when above process are used.

One thing , there weren't many flies up Hay last year making food management easy.

Robin Miller


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AnswerID: 244580

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 10:52

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 10:52
Hi Robin,
Interesting about the bread. We've been taking the Helgas bread last few trips, and have had no problems making it last 2+ weeks doing nothing. Hate to think how many grams of preservatives are in that stuff. Bakers delight was always the quickest to grow mould - I guess they don't use preservatives.

Cheers
phil
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 12:02

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 12:02
Hi Phil
It is interesting - normally we buy only $1 a loaf bread from a little asian shop in Hampton park Melbourne.

It last only 4-5 days.
When we go camping we buy $3 supermarket stuff and it lasts 1-2 weeks

As you say - its all in the preservatives,

Robin Miller
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Follow Up By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 16:47

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 16:47
I know the thread is about keeping vegies - but - theres always a but.

We have found that Rye Bread will stay fresher much longer than any other, but then every one probably knows this already

Ian
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FollowupID: 505680

Reply By: Members - Chris/Lindsay (VIC) - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 20:27

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 20:27
Pillow slips work well. Just keep each type of vege,fruit separate. Stack into a ventilated cardboard box and put bags, coat ,blankets over them. It worked for us in 40 degrees in the Simpson last year.
AnswerID: 244741

Follow Up By: Royston - Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 21:02

Monday, Jun 04, 2007 at 21:02
Hi everyone.

Thanks heaps for all the great ideas, and its nice to know there are so many of you out there willing to share what has worked for you. We'll sift through the catalogue of ideas for vegie storage and put it into practice for the big trip. BTW, we don't have a fridge because a certain somebody thinks they are way over priced, take up too much room in the Hilux tub, are too heavy, and require a second battery (more weight) with all the associated wiring/switchovers etc etc.

Cheers
the better half

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