maxtrax or sand ladders

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 17:09
ThreadID: 46620 Views:11016 Replies:5 FollowUps:8
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Regards all, just gearing up for the 'just in case' recovery gear. Comments? maxtrax have a good rep, but it seemed to me that the sand ladders would work in the same way in the mud, though probably harder to extract and clean? Might come down to weight and price?
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Reply By: pepper2 - Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 17:48

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 17:48
how about some strips of plastic garden lattice about 3 mm thick with square holes about 2 inches square?
AnswerID: 246607

Follow Up By: Member - 'Lucy' - Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 18:20

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 18:20
Hot Damn!

Luv it - how wide do you cut it.

Just luv Aussie inventiveness even more.
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Follow Up By: V8 Troopie - Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 23:35

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 23:35
Dunno about plastic lattice but this is what I used in sand dunes (canning stockroute) and it worked:
Bought a sheet of weldmesh, galvanised, 25x50mm mesh size, 3mm thick wire. This was cut into strips (with bolt cutters) 1.8m long and about 300 wide, got 6 of them out of the sheet.
The wire ends were cut flush on the long sides and on one of the short side. On the other short side the ends were bent back (with a tube) to form hooks. Bend it so the hook forms over the cross wire, not aweay from it.

The hooks allowed me to hook the strips together and make one twice as long or longer.

To use them was to place two hooked together stips of mesh ahead of the front wheels and one ahead of the rear wheels. Digging their ends a little under the wheel helped too.

After carefully driving onto the mesh, enough momentum could be gathered to clear the dune where we were silly enough to stop on top of to take pictures.

The mesh was a bit deformed from driving over it but that was easily straightened by jumping on it on a flat piece of ground.

I carried all 6 pieces strapped to the bull bar, they are not heavy and did not restrict the air flow.

I would imagine they work equally well in mud but would advise to tie colored ribbons to the strips so they can be found again afterwards, they were hard enough to spot buried in the sand.

The strips are still in the shed, waiting for the next adventure.

Klaus
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Reply By: Cram - Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 18:28

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 18:28
That sounds like some good practical advise and cheap. I am not sure how much the sand ladders are worth but I know Maxtrax is around $300 for a pair.
AnswerID: 246620

Follow Up By: Member - Mal B - Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 20:12

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 20:12
i looked at old conveyor belt say 300mm wide min thick may be 10m long you could roll up to store. jack up and put under wheels then hook a 3m chain to the each end as you drive away [hopefully] tow it with you to good ground hope this helps mal b
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Follow Up By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 21:52

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 21:52
I tried that once and it was a dismal failure for me. The tyres gripped the belt but the belt did not grip the ground, belting shot out the back at a great rate of knots and vehicle effectively stayed in the same place :-))
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Reply By: Richard Kovac - Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 22:19

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 22:19
nigel
We have a set MAXTRAX and have not used them yet (hope I don't have to use them) allready drive a Troopy shouldn't need them...LOL

but if they work as good as the film (& as Roothy says) LOL they are cheep recovery gear.

Cheers Richard
AnswerID: 246671

Reply By: Dave from P7OFFROAD Accredited Driver Training - Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 23:29

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2007 at 23:29
We use Maxtrax on our courses.

They are a fantastic bit of kit. The biggest difference between them and many other products (including home made ones) is that they 'pull' under the tyre, with just about every other suggestion that people continue to make, you need to put it under the tyre to work, or it is too flexible and just bunches up uselessly

Once you have seen them in use, you'll see how good they are.

For those that are interested I'll send you a link to a thread i started elsewhere about my trip to the Fraser Island Fishing Expo with the manufacturers of Maxtrax.

Many of the knockers have never seen them, let alone held them and certainly not used them. Australian made, Australian designed, by two Australian families...!
AnswerID: 246685

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 07:34

Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 07:34
I'm sure you're right but... at $300 plus delivery they are too dear for me to buy _another_ piece of recovery gear. At $200 I would.

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: Ted (Cairns) - Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 08:41

Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 08:41
They certainly look like a good product and incorporate a few new features, but all the hype about "Australian made, Australian designed, by two Australian families" gets a bit ridiculous. Sand ladders (as in the aluminium sheets with holes and hooks initially used for building improvised landing strips and then found useful for recovery) are around since WW2

ex army sand ladders

and plastic ones (fiberglass mat or "trelis") were sold as recovery aids in Europe, Britain and US for many years now.

fiberglass waffle board

Not to mention all homebuilt versions of sand ladders...

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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 09:00

Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 09:00
Ted those prices are in USD, plus shipping to Aus :-) pretty dear items.
makes the Maxtrax look cheap.
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Follow Up By: Grizzle - Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 10:35

Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 10:35
I'd be interested in the link Dave, going up to Fraser at the end of the month and was wondering whether to buy exhaust jack, stick with high lift or something like maxtrax.

Cheers,

Grizzle

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Reply By: Member - Howard (ACT) - Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 21:20

Thursday, Jun 14, 2007 at 21:20
have used strips of old ww2 'Marsden matting' (steel version)plenty of times in mud and always with success. not big into sand driving so havent used in that situation.
steel versions are 2 heavy to carry on a trip but alumnium/or plastic could be way to go.
agree $300 is to expensive, thats half way to a winch. which gives 30 metres not 30 inches.
my 2 bobs worth
cheers
howard
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