driving light wiring

Submitted: Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 13:37
ThreadID: 5023 Views:2161 Replies:7 FollowUps:7
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Could some tell me what wiring i should run my rallye 4000 driving lights on or how to work it out.
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Reply By: Member - Dave (Pilbara) - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 14:48

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 14:48
150 watts each = 300watts
300/12= 25 amps
2.5mm sq is good for about 30 amps but to be safe I would go to 4mm sq to allow for any voltage drop you may get or run a seperate 2.5 mmsq to each one. A 32 amp relay will do the trick.
AnswerID: 20544

Reply By: Member - Topcat - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 15:13

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 15:13
Hi Tim. The usual method is to wire your driving lights directly to your battery via a
relay inter-connected to your headlamp high beam switch so that your driving lights
come on when your highbeam headlights are switched on. Also fit a suitable toggle switch mounted in your dashboard and wired into the circuit between the
relay and headlamp switch so the driving lights can independently be switched off when your headlamp high beam is on.
It is a requirement by state motor vehicle registration departments that driving lights do not run independent of your normal headlights, that is why you must connect them through a relay to your high beam switch.
The relay and toggle switch can be obtained at any auto electrician outlet as well as the wiring cable. Usually cable rated at 15amps will do the trick. I'm not sure
what the current draw on your driving lights are, but if they draw more then 15 amps then go to a higher rate cable. The cable run from the relay to the high beam circuit need not be heavy duty as this is only required to activate the relay.
If you have a maual on your vehicle there may be an option in the wiring diagram showing how driving lights are wired up.
Hope this helps. Cheers.Have Wheels Will Travel
AnswerID: 20550

Reply By: chopper - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 15:46

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 15:46
I think that the 4000s come with 100 w bulbs, not 150s. It is not a good idea to use bigger bulbs as there is a real heat issue and it can lead to reflector degradation.

Many people will tell you to use 6mm cable, but have a look at the guage of the cable coming out of the light. It is nowhere near 6mm, much closer to 2-3mm.

I, also, have rallye 4000 after too many experiments with lesser supposedly "just as good" products.

enjoy
AnswerID: 20556

Follow Up By: Big John (QLD) - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 19:40

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 19:40
Chopper, I also have rallye 4000 lights and like you I have also gone through several of the others including one brand that offers over a 20 year warranty. I must say their warranty was good they replaced 3 sets. I finally got sick of replaceing them. The mounting system on the 4000 is extremely strong and easy to adjust. After my last trip to cape york the 4000 had no damage or dust inside. Though the mounting brackets are so strong they cracked the ally bull bar instead. Also make sure you use lock tight on the knowled adjustment bolts we had one come out, though we were lucky it got jamed in the corner of the bull bar and we did not loose it.

Regards Big John
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FollowupID: 13217

Follow Up By: Tuco69 - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 21:29

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 21:29
"Many people will tell you to use 6mm cable, but have a look at the guage of the cable coming out of the light. It is nowhere near 6mm, much closer to 2-3mm. "

The only way to establish if the wire between the relay and the driving light is heavy enough - is to measure the voltage at the connector where it feeds into the light. This must be measured with the light running and compared with what is available at the battery or alternator output. Anything more that 0.5 volt difference will mean that the wire isn't heavy enough to carry the load.

Minimising any voltage losses will benefit the overall performance of the light.
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FollowupID: 13237

Reply By: Kev - (Cairns,QLD) - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 20:08

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 20:08
I am in the market to buy a set of spoties and nearly fell over when i saw the price tag on most i looked at.

Are they worth the $600-700 each ?

What about the 240 lightforce at a $1000 each, ouch !

How much night driving do people do to justify these expences ?

Kev.
AnswerID: 20602

Follow Up By: Autolec - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 21:04

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 21:04
Kev that is what I would like to know.
I prefer to be all camped up at night.
Show pony is a term that comes to mind.

Fitting the Hella Premium Xenon 50 bulbs will make a damn big difference to the standard headlights of modern cars. Headlights in the last 5 years have come a long way in design.
H4 Premium Xenon - 50% Brighter White Light

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FollowupID: 13231

Follow Up By: Savvas - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11:54

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11:54
Hi Kev,

Were you looking at HID driving lights instead of Halogen? They are obscenely expensive and I doubt they are worth it.

Plus it would really hurt if you broke one.

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FollowupID: 13277

Follow Up By: Kev - (Cairns,QLD) - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 19:14

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 19:14
Savvas,

Yes your right, i think they were HID as i don't know much about them.

Im glad there are cheaper ones !

Kev.
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FollowupID: 13298

Reply By: Slammin - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 23:42

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 23:42
Kev,

Horses for courses or as someone else used minis v tight jeans.

We have to travel in the wee early hours or late ones to get to town etc.

The main thing we have found is that a pencil and a spread beam on the left is the best setup. As we need the most light avail. we have 2 sets. 1 set in the bullbar and 1 set above, we used 2nd hand set of Oscars and newish Narvas all up @$100. Use locktight and make sure all is tight. Keep in mind that if you get a smashed R4000 you'd be spewin.

As said above consider how much use they'll actually get or how good they make you feel.
AnswerID: 20633

Reply By: Simon - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11:16

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11:16
Kev, you shouldnt pay anymore than $200 each for Ralley4000s.
and the Hella 160 shouldnt be overlooked at around $130 a PAIR.

Tim, Hella make a wireing kit im sure it would be worthwile. not sure on cost tho.
Just make sure you have over 12 volts at the light when its going.
AnswerID: 20655

Follow Up By: Simon - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11:20

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11:20
By the way, Iv found Truckline to be good with Hella prices, altho I think Iveco dealers have got a special on at the moment with Ralley4000s for $170? each.
(get pencil beams too, spread beams not as good)
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FollowupID: 13272

Follow Up By: Tuco69 - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 14:31

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 14:31
"Just make sure you have over 12 volts at the light when its going."

Sorry Simon, but I disagree. Halogen won't flux at only 12.0 Volts.
If the alternator is putting out 13.8V, then 13.3V " at the light when its going" would be the minimum that I would want - preferably 13.5V or more.
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FollowupID: 13282

Reply By: Simon - Thursday, May 22, 2003 at 12:21

Thursday, May 22, 2003 at 12:21
I agree Tuco, Id want at least 13.5 volts too.
But I have a new work truck (WesternStar) with 4000s on it and upon checking am only geting 10.3 volts at the lights. They work ok just realy dull.
Wouldnt you think that when you pay close to $200 000 for a truck theyd be able to put heavy enough wires in them?
My last truck I had the driving lights power taken from the alternator which, depending on where your batterys are can make a difference too.
AnswerID: 20760

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