Preventing viscous fans from spinning

Submitted: Monday, Nov 05, 2001 at 01:00
ThreadID: 504 Views:1574 Replies:3 FollowUps:5
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In vehicles fitted with the viscous fan hubs, if you were to secure the fan blades so they don't spin (before starting of course) what would happen when starting and with the engine running??
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Reply By: Steve- Monday, Nov 05, 2001 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 05, 2001 at 01:00
It is a method taught by several 4wd clubs. A small hole in 1 blade and a SECURE attachment under the engine bay. Just hook it up before you take the plunge :) I also assume that the engine would be cooled down....to put the least strain on the viscous clutch.

Note that I have not done it myself.....I find if the engine is cool enough the viscous fan stops with the friction of the water coming through the radiator.

Stsve
2001 78 Series Troopy
AnswerID: 1333

Reply By: clint - Monday, Nov 05, 2001 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 05, 2001 at 01:00
Not a good idea at all, you will overheat the hub
and the oil inside it, and probably blow out the
fusable plug which is located inside the hub
AnswerID: 1335

Follow Up By: Steve - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2001 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2001 at 01:00
True, if the engine is hot, and therefore the fan has engaged (you could make a real mess). However, it is only recommended for cool motors, at least with the people I've seen do it. Note that with a cool motor the fan free wheels anyway at road speed with the pressure of the air ...the whole idea of having the viscous clutch, it only uses power when you need it.

And we all know to cool our fourbys down BEFORE we go into water, don't we ;)

BTW, this does not negate the use of a wading sheet in deep water, as there is still electronics etc that you want to keep water out of. The less water in the engine bay the better.

Steve
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FollowupID: 411

Follow Up By: Steve - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2001 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2001 at 01:00
True, if the engine is hot, and therefore the fan has engaged (you could make a real mess). However, it is only recommended for cool motors, at least with the people I've seen do it. Note that with a cool motor the fan free wheels anyway at road speed with the pressure of the air ...the whole idea of having the viscous clutch, it only uses power when you need it.

And we all know to cool our fourbys down BEFORE we go into water, don't we ;)

BTW, this does not negate the use of a wading sheet in deep water, as there is still electronics etc that you want to keep water out of. The less water in the engine bay the better.

Steve
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FollowupID: 412

Follow Up By: Steve - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2001 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2001 at 01:00
Sorry about the double post....the browser went haywire there fore a minute.

Stev
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FollowupID: 413

Follow Up By: Keith - Thursday, Nov 08, 2001 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 08, 2001 at 01:00
I thought it sounded a good idea too. Tied up the fan on my Pajero at the numerous river crossings on trip up Telegraph Track, Cape York, end result was having to replace the whole fan hub assembly on return to Cairns, an expensive lesson learnt!
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FollowupID: 420

Follow Up By: Rod - Monday, Nov 12, 2001 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 12, 2001 at 01:00
Thanks for your replies Steve, Keith and Joe. I've just replaced the hub (old age) not cheap. In water that is basicly no higher than the bottom of the radiator my troopy's fan picks it up and sprays it all over the place. I was trying to eliminated the problem. Lets face it we don't wait for everything to cool down, we just plunge straight in. Looks like its something I'm going to have to live with. Thanks again
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FollowupID: 429

Reply By: Joe - Friday, Nov 09, 2001 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 09, 2001 at 01:00
As the others stated if its left to cool before any serious crossing the drag of the water should be enough to stop it spinning without doing any damage to the interior. A safer option!
AnswerID: 1372

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