low range in 2wd

Submitted: Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 00:46
ThreadID: 5043 Views:3064 Replies:10 FollowUps:5
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So.... If you select low range without engaging 4wd do you do any damage? Working on the principle that the dumbest question is the one that isn't asked.
Stlll here... RoyceRoyce www.funshow.com.au
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Reply By: Redjack - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 01:51

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 01:51
Royce,
What sort of transmission system is it? If it's a part time system with free wheeling hubs that aren't engaged, and for a short distance only, probably not. If your 4wd system requires the centre diff to be locked and you can't disengage the front wheels - probably yes.
I'm assuming your refering to the troopy in your avitar, which would be a part time system. Then you could use low range 4wd and leave the hubs unlocked for short distance manouvering and it would probably be Ok.
AnswerID: 20643

Reply By: GaryInOz (Vic) - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 02:00

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 02:00
All four wheel drive selectors will go into 4HI before they will allow you to select 4LO. The selection of 2HI4HI in most instances may be done on the move (see your owners manual for top speed at which this can be done, varies across different types of transfer cases). The selection of 4HI4LO should be done when stationary (no syncromesh). BE SURE TO LOCK YOUR HUBS well before you think you might need 4WD!! (if you have manual hubs.)

You can do a "trick" 2LO by leaving the hubs unlocked and selecting 2LO...DO NOT DO THIS!!! It can place too greater strain on the rear differential and will result in premature failure. The damage is easy to see and will probably void your warranty.
AnswerID: 20644

Reply By: tour boy - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 06:33

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 06:33
Been doing this for years reversing large trailers in tight spots with hubs unlocked. No adverse affects. The only way this strains the back diff is if you are trying to do somthing stupid like drive up rockshelves or somthing like that. Hope this helps. By the way had a truck identical to yours but with the 13 seats and the 6 extra windows in the roof .
AnswerID: 20645

Reply By: Tuco69 - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 08:39

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 08:39
The increase in 'pulling power' that is achieved by selecting low range is because the available engine torque is multiplied by whatever the low range reduction gear ratio is. Because of the huge increase that becomes available, the majority of manufacturers engineer their systems so that the torque is spread over two (or more) axles when low range is selected. Applying all the extra available torque to only one axle could have detrimental effects.
However 'cheating' the system on a vehicle by not engaging the free wheeling hubs, in order to slowly reverse a trailer or caravan should not present any problem. This is because mostly you will only be idling the motor and not achieving the high torque that a wide open throttle would give.

Tuco
AnswerID: 20649

Reply By: Member - Willem- Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 09:35

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 09:35
Hello Royce,

For those of us who have trucks that date back before the didgital age and are part time 4wd the answer is NO. You won't damage your gearbox or drive train. I use this method quite often with trailers or when traversing a short distance over rough terrain. Have done so for years. I would not however try it with a vehicle that was prone to breaking rear axles.(I won't mention manufacturers so as to avoid a howl of protest on this thread)

Cheers, Willem
Never a dull moment
AnswerID: 20651

Follow Up By: diamond(bendigo) - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11:50

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11:50
shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh toyota isnt it
just between you and me.
lol

looking foward to september(landcruiser park/fraser island)
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FollowupID: 13275

Follow Up By: Member - Willem- Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 18:03

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 18:03
Diamond, Are you trying to get me into trouble? Actually I wasn't thinking of Toyota but an older brand name. But please don't mention it as everyone who has one will join in a diatribe against me like in a previous post some time ago:-)Cheers, Willem
Never a dull moment
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FollowupID: 13293

Follow Up By: diamond(bendigo) - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 18:37

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 18:37
sorry mate was just kiddinglooking foward to september(landcruiser park/fraser island)
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FollowupID: 13297

Follow Up By: ice - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 20:30

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 20:30
Wouldn't be ST/TI 4.8 ltr petrol would it???
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FollowupID: 13308

Reply By: crowe - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 13:35

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 13:35
i have done it for years, great for circlework on the beach!!! if your that way inclined. Be pretty hardpressed to destroy a patrol rear diff, not sure about toyota's but have mates that are forever shearing rear axle studs in 4WD let alone 2WD in lowrange
AnswerID: 20671

Reply By: Dozer - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 14:21

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 14:21
Hi
the thing to watch out for is the diff and axles. if you are in low, you can theoreticly put too much torque to an axle set and break something, atleast when in 4wd, the diffs share the torque/ traction/work whatever you want to call it.
Andrew
AnswerID: 20676

Reply By: projects - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 15:43

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 15:43
I have seen an American company that offers a 2wd Low conversion for Suzuki Sierra's (The only component that needs to be reworked is the small shift fork. There is a little grinding and a little welding to be done) http://www.izook.com/reviews/pw2wdlow/pw2wdlow.htm
Just wondering how this relates to the above Q & A.
AnswerID: 20682

Follow Up By: GaryInOz (Vic) - Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 18:03

Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 18:03
More than likely for the use of oversized tyres. 1.3 litres pulling 38" boggers with a 4.? rato diff????
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FollowupID: 13294

Reply By: projects - Thursday, May 22, 2003 at 10:49

Thursday, May 22, 2003 at 10:49
I came across another company that offers replacement shifter forks that allow 2wd low. Their response when asking what the difference is to just leaving the hubs unlocked and putting it into 4wd low was "There is no difference. It is just a matter of convenience. It is nice to have the 4WD on demand rather than climbing in and out for hub locking. Nice also to have only rear wheel drive when 4wd is not needed on the trail."

AnswerID: 20753

Reply By: David N. - Monday, May 26, 2003 at 07:49

Monday, May 26, 2003 at 07:49
It's actually a very good idea to do it when backing a trailer etc to save wear on your clutch- have been doing it for 30 odd years - the talk about "overloading" your diff is rubbish (in most vehicles) unless you are thrashing your vehicle- What do you think happens when one axle is in mud and the other bites?
AnswerID: 21043

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