Goannas - i love em

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 09:47
ThreadID: 53297 Views:3776 Replies:11 FollowUps:10
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Always enjoy seeing these guys in the wild.
got a couple of photos from the weekend

Rosembergs goanna from Near the blackwood river


goulds goanna from the Boyagin nature reserve
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Reply By: Dunco (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 10:31

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 10:31
Love the reptiles !!!!

But love all of our native wildlife ...it is something you really miss when you go overseas. I used to wake up in Europe wondering where the screech of the Cockatoos was ...........
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Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 13:09

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 13:09
Same here. But we found that compared to home there was virtually no bird life.
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Reply By: Bware (Tweed Valley) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 10:48

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 10:48
Great shots Davoe, thanks.
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Reply By: Member - bushfix - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 10:52

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 10:52
likewise Davoe.

i had four days in Chichester SF and Goulburn River NP last week. The lace monitors were captivating. One day I noticed my 3 year old's beloved beanie meandering along the ground. I went to pick it up and it took off up a large bloodwood. "Drop it you b$#$" I called out as it pinned it down in it's claws and ripped at it with it's jaws. Eventually dropped it but only onto the next lower branch so I had to climb up and get it. Luckily I had not started the afternoon session at that stage. Daughter responded to the damage by wearing it as a balaclava, but after I gave it a good wash to remove the salva.

Yep, I would sit in the sun just marvelling at them. See if I can put some pics up too.
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Reply By: stans truck - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 12:26

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 12:26
Verry nice pics what kind of camera did you use.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 13:35

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 13:35
panasonic point and shoot
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Reply By: turbopete - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 14:26

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 14:26
be careful there is goannas what jumps out of trees and eats ya wwwoooooooohooooooooooooo
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Reply By: furph - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 15:36

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 15:36
Yep, terrific photo,s Davoe.
Couple of years ago, going down to Vic. camped in a woodland reserve on the Cann R.
First thing we saw around the camp was a nice monitor, about 5'long so threw out a couple of scraps.
Next thing here is his mate/brother/cousin/enemy going "remember, whats yours is also mine"and then they were into it.
Bloody hell, I was tap dancing thinking one of these blokes is going to run up my leg any second.
The missus, standing in the door of the van all but pee,d herself.
I eventually said, but where are the photo,s?
Thats life,eh.
furph
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 17:25

Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 17:25
>First thing we saw around the camp was a nice monitor,
>about 5' long so threw out a couple of scraps.

I would ask you, and others, not to feed them please.

They don't need human food - most of it's probably bad for them.

Regular feeding encourages them (and they teach their young) to wait for human handouts rather than seek their own food.

When humans dissapear from the campsite they go hungry.

It encourages them to hang around well used campsites which can be a danger to themselves, children, domestic dogs etc.

Minimal impact includes not changing the ways of native animals.

Mike Harding
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Reply By: Member - Dunworkin (WA) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 15:54

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 15:54
Yes in the wild they are beautiful however just before Christmas we had a half grown one in our house, he finished up on the top of the curtains in one of the rooms, he was subsequently caught and taken to the block of land at the rear of our house which is probably where he came from in the first place.

Cheers

D


Simba, our much missed baby.

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Reply By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 18:45

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 18:45
November just past we were camped at Georges Junction on the Macleay River where we watched a monitor reguarly patrol the area for whatever he/she could find.
This guy/girl? copped an absolute pounding from the Noisy Mynahs who dive bombed him relays while putting up a hell of a lot of screetching.
It was quite hilarious to see this reptile spread flat on its belly and chin pasted into the ground while trying to look like a piece of tree bark. You or I might not of noticed but there was no foolling the Mynahs. I think the Mynahs were saying "@iss off, you egg stealing fastard".


Ian
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Reply By: Member - Lionel A (WA) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 20:56

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 20:56
Hey Davoe,
Not being an expert on reptiles or their habitates but, when Paula and I were on the Holland Track a couple of years ago, we spotted a lizard identical to the Goulds Goanna in your photo.

It allowed us to walk right up to it, check it out, before it had enough of us and bolted like the wind.
Does the goanna inhabit this area, or did we see something else ?

Cheers....Lionel.
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:22

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:22
Lionel

what do you do if a Goanna starts running straight for you?

Cheers

Richard
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Follow Up By: Member - Lionel A (WA) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:28

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:28
Get the bread, butter and tomato sauce ready...hehehe.

Ok Richard, I give up, what am I supposed to do ?

Lionel.
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:35

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:35
Lay on the ground so he doesn't climb you, thinking you're a Tree.

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Follow Up By: Member - Lionel A (WA) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 22:03

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 22:03
Ah! suppose that makes sense, thanks mate.
I recall when I first came to this country I was taking a bit of a stroll around the Bibra Lake area. I chanced upon a slender stick on the path, as I went to kick it off, it reared up on me.
Caught me unaware. Thought to my self pruddy big worms they have over here.

Played around with it for a few moments until a local walking the other way suggested I leave it alone. Turned out to be a juvenile Tiger snake. I didnt need telling twice....hahaha.

Still get a cold shiver every time I think about it.

Cheers....Lionel.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 08:28

Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 08:28
Highly likely lionel they are a v common goanna found over most of OZ.
The bigger they are the easier they are to approach as when full grown they have no natural predator
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 17:43

Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 17:43
>The bigger they are the easier they are to approach as when
>full grown

I thought reptiles continued to grow until they died?

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 19:00

Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 19:00
Unsure on that one- I have heard that of snakes.
your standard bluey or shinglback usually come in a fairly standard size and ones ive had for a few years didint get any bigger.

Im trying to get a picture of a beuty we have hanging around the mine camp. Used to see it all the time until I started bringing my camera up
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Reply By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 23:47

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 23:47
Wonderful photos Davoe and such beautiful fellas. They never stay still for me when i have a camera. Motherhen
Motherhen

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Reply By: Dunedigger - Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 16:51

Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 16:51
They do have an enemy the dingo, now with dingos being shot, poisoned or trapped goannas numbers are building up. They wreak havoc on bird life, eating eggs and hatchlings.

While they do eat all the dead animals and travelers rubbish, there are too many of them.

They can get into the chook house, eat all the eggs then kill a few chooks for good measure.

Goodriddance I say !



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