Triple Bypass in Radiators

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 14:17
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Has any one out there had a triple bypass put in their radiator and how effective were the results, Especially when driving under 20kmph on overgrown tracks in hot desert conditions

Thanks
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Reply By: Peter L - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 20:21

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 20:21
Since no-one else has replied I'll be the dummy! - What is a triple by-pass (of one's radiator)

Peter L.
AnswerID: 22235

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 20:26

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 20:26
I don't mind being a dummy either, Peter, what the hell is it? Maybe getting to the heart of the vehicle?

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Follow Up By: gary - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 21:34

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 21:34
Hey I was a dummy too until about 2 days ago and I laughed at the bloke that told me about it.

Basically it consists of putting a plate across the top of the radiator near the "in" hose to stop the water flow across all teh top of the radiator. This forces the water down and then along the bottom. But you then put another plate near the "out " hose to stop the water and this forces it back up to the top again, when it the evtually gets forced down and out the bottom hose. This means the water spends more time in the readiator and therefore has more time to cool.

Wll thats the best I can describe it with out pictures !!!!! and technical terms.

But I now need a triple bypass as I am overheating

Gary
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Reply By: Allyn (Pilbara) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 20:59

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 20:59
there's a bloke in Port Hedland has had something along those lines done to a 75 series with 6.5 Chev in it. Works a treat and from what I understand he's a regular in the desert or it's outskirts
AnswerID: 22243

Follow Up By: Member - Martyn (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 21:17

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 21:17
Allyn,
I'm with the rest above what is it, sounds like a bit of an X file thing!!!! Mind you it works and that's what counts. Keep the shiny side up
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Follow Up By: gary - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 21:40

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 21:40
Thanks for the info Allyn

I had never heard of it and then I spoke to a bloke that makes stretch Limos. Apparantely they overheat a lot as they are often stationary for long periods with the huge aircon systems on full bore.

This bloke then told me about all the ways he uses to alleviate the problem and a triple bypass was one of them.

So I thought why not, it may solve our occassional overheating problems in extremely hot conditions with limited airflow.

Thanks again

Gary
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FollowupID: 14635

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 22:05

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 22:05
Lots of desert racers and outback challange cars use them..

But lots and lots expensive......
AnswerID: 22254

Reply By: Mick - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 22:48

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 22:48
Just a passing thought - if the water spends more time in the radiator, then it spends less time in the engine, therefore allowing more heat to accumulate there! there's a good reason why most haven't heard of it - it's a Furphy!! A vehicle with a good cooling system doesn't need any mods - I can drive, tow or idle all day with aircon on in extreme temps and never have a problem - I drive a cruiser. Mind you when I had a Pajero it was a different story!!
AnswerID: 22262

Follow Up By: gary - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 22:59

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 22:59
maybe ,more time in the radiator means more time to cool---as long as the water is flowing the engine has the same amount of water ==maybe

gary
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Follow Up By: Peter L - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 23:20

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 23:20
Gary, my logic says it shouldn't work.
As stated above what you are effectively doing is slowing the flow of the coolant. This means that the engine is going to get HOTTER.
Seems if the water stays too long in the radiator the amount of heat which can be dispersed to air is less if the temp difference is small. What's needed is rapid flow so the radiator is effectively full of HOT coolant - thus more heat is passed to the air flow.
After all the whole point of a correctly operating thermostat is to allow MAXIMUM flow of coolant when the engine is realy hot!

Good luck

Peter L.
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Follow Up By: GaryInOz (Vic) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 23:31

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 23:31
You are not slowing the coolant flow you are just making it take a "longer" path of high velocity water rather than a "wider" path of low velocity water through the radiator, same overall volume in/out.
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FollowupID: 14641

Follow Up By: Allyn (Pilbara) - Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 15:51

Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 15:51
Just thinking out loud here Mick, but how does water spend less time in the engine when you're not reducing or increasing the flow but merely diverting it. Water pump should still be doing the same job and you would have increased storage capacity because of extra pipework etc
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Reply By: awill4x4 - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 23:00

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 23:00
Gary, I think I know the company you are talking about. (Des##t Coo##ers)
The owner has had a very good marketing campaign going particularly in the street rod industry.
Essentially what happens is it slows the rate of water flowing through your radiator as it has to travel further. The theory being that because it is exposed to ambient air for a longer period it cools down more. This is true, "up to a point".
What they don't tell you is that because the water stays in your radiator longer, it also stays in your engine longer so in fact the water enters your radiator at a higher temp than it would normally and your thermostat stays open for longer periods.
In my eyes, it's a snake oil pitch. If you want better cooling increase your volume and better yet get an aluminium radiator. They are far more efficient than brass/copper ones.
Regards Andrew.
ps here's a link to the custom one I built for my GQ Patrol automatic. It uses the same core as that used by most of the supercars. (Skaife, Ambrose, Weel etc)
I'm using 2 auto trans coolers in the tanks and an auxialliary one as well. The capacity is approx twice that of a standard Patrol radiator.

http://board.performanceforums.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=3295&papass=&sort=1&thecat=500
AnswerID: 22266

Reply By: -OzyGuy- - Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 01:11

Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 01:11
From what I do know of the workings of radiators, the water is forced into the radiator in only one direction.. by the water pump.
In the radiator it is forced through the vertical 'pipes' to the opposite end, it is cooled only by the passage of air accross the radiator coils connected to these 'vertical pipes' ...
therefore, if you decrease the amount of the 'coils' that are exposed to the cooling air then I find it hard to believe that it will cool faster or cooler as the water has to travel again through the engine block to get back to the radiator...
I believe the larger the exposed area of the radiator coils the better it will cool, to the point that the thermostat does close if the water is too cool before it re-enters the block.
AnswerID: 22279

Reply By: -OzyGuy- - Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 01:24

Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 01:24
From what I do know of the workings of radiators, the water is forced into the radiator ---> in only one direction ---> by the water pump, at the preasure and speed of the water pump, it is circulated through the radiator under preasure and can't 'wait' in the radiator to cool before returning to the engine block.

In the radiator it is forced through the vertical 'pipes' to the opposite end,
it is cooled only by the passage of air accross the radiator coils connected to these 'vertical pipes' ...
therefore, if you decrease the amount of the 'coils' that are exposed to the cooling air, I find it hard to believe that it will cool faster or cooler as the water has to once again travel again through the engine block to get back to the radiator...

I believe the larger the exposed area of the radiator coils the better it will cool, to the point that the thermostat does close if the water is too cool before it re-enters the block.
Either I don't understand the idea... or it is as has been stated a phurphy.
AnswerID: 22280

Reply By: Member - Gordon- Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 14:12

Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 14:12
Well guys, what we are talking about here is a 3 pass radiator. I have just had my 3 core radiator(Patrol) done and I can assure you that it does have a better cooling affect.You are correct, the flow has more resistance in the radiator as the pump is still trying to pump the same amount of water through 1/3 of the radiator at any one time, that is, 3 passes through the air flow. Yes the water would be slower passing through the engine,(not by much) this would be benificial as it has more time to pick up heat from the engine. I have only done 1 trip to Brisbane and back (1200km) and I immediately noticed when the radiator fan cut in, the temp gauge was reading lower than before, therefore, the water temp.at the temp. sender was lower than the middle or second pass through the radiator.
Before I had this done, at 105/110km. the temp would rise a little causing the radiator fan to cut in and bring the temp. back down again, now I can sit on that speed and the temp gauge does not move. Remember the faster you go ,more revs, faster the water flows through the radiator,les time in the air stream for cooling.
This operation to the radiator cost $150, what does Alum. cores etc. that super cars use cost.
Hope this throws some light on the subject.
AnswerID: 22305

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