Rear shocky mounts on hilux

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:13
ThreadID: 5390 Views:1892 Replies:3 FollowUps:5
This Thread has been Archived
Have a 92 hilux dual cab . the rear shocks mount one fore and one aft of the diff. The local suspension guy said it was because toyota couldn't be bothered making a left and righ hand bracket for the diff so just reversed it and changed the mounting point on the chassis. My question is does anyone know if someone makes an opposite bracket to convert to having an aft mount near side shock. of course I would have to weld a mounting bracket on the chassis as well. The local guy says there is no reason or anything to stop it but suggested that maybe someone supplies the bits for this conversion rather than trying to fabricate your own. Your toughts would be appreciated as this shock in heavy four wheel driving cops a bit of a hiding.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:16

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:16
try snake racing
www.snakeracing.com.au

why are you so keen to change it? does it cause problems?

IMHO If it aint broke, dont fix it
AnswerID: 22226

Follow Up By: howesy - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:24

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:24
Thats my point, this is the second time I have damaged a shock absorber. Always the fore mounted one and on the off side I have no problems with the diff or the shock. It would seem the the wheel doesn't quite give lift over rocks before the shock contacts them. ( on some occassions )
0
FollowupID: 14610

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:25

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:25
So then something else is at fault... Not everyone has this problem

Are your shocks too short/long, bumpstops wrong, springs too short/long etc

I know blokes running 38's on their lux's with big lifts, and no such problem

also try www.outerlimits4x4.com its the competitors list.
0
FollowupID: 14611

Follow Up By: howesy - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:41

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 19:41
With all due respect perhaps if you saw the shock. The local suspension guy has. It has been damaged by a collision with an object. It looks like someone gave it a full swing with a brickies hammer. Yes I do some hard yards , but I crawl over things and the man who has had the benefit of examining the vehicle says moving the shock will alleviate my problem , asthe wheel itself should provide lift over objects to avoid the axle housing from hitting howwever this is not the case for the poor old shock. I want to follow his advice and try the modification and to this end I was maybe hoping for some positive helpful feed back. I appreciate your concern, but i will probably follow the advice of those who have examined the vehicle.
0
FollowupID: 14615

Reply By: Tuco69 - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 20:24

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 20:24
Howsey - your suspension 'guy' must be a goose!
"The local suspension guy said it was because toyota couldn't be bothered making a left and righ hand bracket for the diff so just reversed it and changed the mounting point on the chassis."
Doesn't he know anything about bias mounted rear shocks?
The Hilux isn't the only vehicle with bias mounted rear shocks - take a look at Rodeos, Couriers, Mazdas - just about every medium duty ute out of Japan has bias mounted rear shocks. Even Range Rovers back in 1970 had them! Nothing new or rocket science - just a torque compensation thing.

Tuco in Cairns
AnswerID: 22236

Reply By: Member - Martyn (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 21:13

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 21:13
howesy,
As Tuco69 mentions it's to do with torque compensation and not a lot to do with brackets design or cost, as you accelerate and de-celerate the torque on the axle changes by 180 degrees, if you watch as you drive alongside another fourby you will see the axle twitch as the driver goes through the gear changes, not that I'm condoning an usafe act here, watching another persons axle as you drive away from a standing start, more of a glimpse. This is why I suspect you can put shock absorbers inside coil springs and the like on the front suspension, maybe, not to sure about this one. The shock absorber is a double acting device but the larger surface area of the piston is usually facing down and absorbes slightly more going up. Or that's what I've been lead to believe. Anybody else? Keep the shiny side up
AnswerID: 22245

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 12:15

Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 12:15
I tried! LOL!
0
FollowupID: 14661

Follow Up By: howesy - Sunday, Jun 15, 2003 at 17:02

Sunday, Jun 15, 2003 at 17:02
Thank you all for your advice. I went back to the guy and as I said originally yes tuco is right toyota couldnt be bothered making a left and right but he says this particular vehicle the shocks do very little in stabilising the diff in those parameters , you can take them off and your diff wont roll over on you. To simply turn the bracket makes the shock mount on the wrong side of the spring and there is no physical room for it to go between the tyre and the spring. he could cut and mirror the bracket but thought that some one may have a cheat. He says I have three options , stop going places of an extreme nature, try this modification, or go to larger diam. tyres so that the rolling diam. gives some lift to the vehicle before the shock contacts the obsticle . ( the damage is occuring approx. 2-3 inches abobe the bottom of the shock which is just on or below the centreline of the axle. Youve all been great with your input guys, thanks heaps.
0
FollowupID: 14897

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)