choice of batteries

Submitted: Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 15:14
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I have searched the archives but have not found the information that I am after. I am about to replace the two batteries in the 100 series and have been looking at Century N70Z "severe service" as recomended by a friend in the industry but no doubt there are many options. I will be running two Engel 40l. fridges, one for grog and the other freezer, and I wondered what others are doing. any help will be appreciated.
Cheers, Nev.
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (FNQ) - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 15:40

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 15:40
Try this for a starter
Look for the Batteries


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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 15:54

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 15:54
Thats great for a starter Doug but what about the deep cycle?
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (FNQ) - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 17:07

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 17:07
Bonz
Think of the Limbo, How low did you, How low can you go, just go a little lower and you just might find some, the Yellow Top.

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Reply By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 16:00

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 16:00
No doubt Neville you'll find that battery a good option, Century are good kit. Other good units are Delco and Yuasa (which are part of Century too I think).

I have gone with a marine type sealed battery for the aux battery in the patrol and its been great. Went that way after lots of research (marine I mean) then looked around for one reasonably priced, not a cheapie but a goodie at a reasonable price. Found they are much of a muchness for like batteries in price and ended up buying local. Mine are N70ZZ, the 70 is just the size of the battery and the ZZ means something like how the pos and neg terminals are arranged on the battery.

Doug's site (above) is a GREAT RESOURCE for all manner of 4b stuff, I have it bookmarked and refer to it when I need to link to or know stuff. (Don't tell Doug he'll get all self important hahahaha)
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 16:25

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 16:25
Nev,
You and I are similar - same motor and alternator and I run two engels - a 40litre as a fridge, and an old 39l as a cooler, although I tried the fridge/freezer combo in the past.

My setup is simply two N70 Exide Extreme batteries under the bonnet - one to start it, and the other is the auxillary with a Rotronics isolator. I am always driving each day, so the batteries get recharged daily. In hot weather, the auxillary battery will be down to about 12.0 volts overnight - i.e. mostly run down by the following morning. In normal winter weather, theres no issue - about 12.3volts at worst.

I guess it depends on how you want to use them. If you want to stay put for a day or two, you'll need a second auxillary battery.

Your 100series had twin starting batteries. Experience is that you only need one N70 to start this vehicle, so many people isolate the second battery on the drivers side and leave an N70 on the passengers side to crank the vehicle. You can fit a third battery in an aftermarket tray further back on the passengers side.

The confusing bit is all the conflicting info you'll get on forums about what type of battery to get. I use the Exide Extremes because I've had bad experiences with the wet cell deep cycle batteries, and I don't believe the AGMs will go the distance in the hot conditions under the bonnet. I buy two new batteries every 3 years, and relegate the used ones into my kids vehicles, where they last for many more years. But thats what suits me - won't suit many others.
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 16:57

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 16:57
>I don't believe the AGMs will go the distance in the hot
>conditions under the bonnet.

Despite what you will frequently read on this forum Phil is quite correct - AGM batteries are not specified for underbonnet use.

Most AGMs are speced. for a maximum temperature of 55C but the temperature spec is quite complex and does not usually include a temperature against current curve - the best manufacturer in this regard is probably Optima and even they specify charging currents at a maximum battery temperature of 51.7C which is well bellow the norm for underbonnet temperatures especially in Oz!

http://www.optimabatteries.com.au/Content/Documents/D75_25_082104.pdf

You can put an AGM underbonnet but you _will_ reduce it's life - perhaps significantly.

AGMs are great batteries but keep them in cooler conditions.

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: Rock Ape - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 23:59

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 23:59
Mike,
I have just retired an Optima yellow top battery that is 7yrs old, it spent it's first 2 yrs as a winder skip radio battery, it then was retired because it part of the safety system. I had it under the bonnet of my 75 series for the next 5yrs and only retired it because I got another yellow of a skip. 75series cruisers get seriously hot under the bonnet but there seems to have been no ill effect on the battery. I also run a red top which is 2yrs old and have had no problems


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Reply By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 17:06

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 17:06
I would recommend the All-Rounder.

MRV70 and MRV70L

105 a/h 760cca and M/free.

Call 1300 BATTERY for your local stockist.

Regards

Derek.

AnswerID: 283868

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 17:36

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 17:36
MRV70 get very few hits on Google (150 only) are you able to provide a link to a full data sheet for it?

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:10

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:10
Sorry Mike I don't have a full data sheet for you to dismantle.

You would need to contact Super-Charge batteries direct for that. I only have the basic specs available and my personal experiences with the product.



Regards

Derek.
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Follow Up By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:17

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:17
Note: Here is the latest label.

The cca has been improved. This is the same battery we use for our ABR-SIDEWINDER Fridge/freezer TEST

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Follow Up By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:21

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:21
SUPERCHARGE WEB PAGE
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:28

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:28
I'm afraid I can't find a proper datasheet on their website:

http://linux.supercharge.com.au/index.htm

I'm sure there will be one somewhere and I would be interested to see it.

Mike Harding


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Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:34

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 18:34
Mike harding is absolutely correct no AGM will withstand under bonnet temperature without suffering a shortened life.

The best AGMs are Lifeline Optima and Oddessey and if anyone wants verification of Mikes statement I can tell you where to see approx 120 AGM.s used in an extreme heat and charge discharge application that died in under 12 months.


The under bonnet heat does not only apply to AGM batteries any batteries to be used for Deep cycle applications will suffer a shorter life in an under bonnet application.

The Optima a a good battery but is short on capacity.

East Penn now have an AGM in Australia with high recombination the same as the above stated batteries and is is economical to buy against all other AGMs available and is good value for money..
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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 22:06

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 22:06
Wheelybin and Mike H ,, tis one thing to be able to say the specs say blah blah blah but in REAL life use any Battery is only as good as it charge /discharge /maintenance , My Fullriver Agm HGL 80amp ,, 1 as starter 2nd as aux separated by redarc copy have lived underbonnet in the 80 series Turbo diesel since Feb 2000 , that gents is 8years in the HEAT of a TURBO diesel and still going strong , price when bought was $200 per batt , = $25 per year ,,
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 23:59

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 23:59
Derek,
The MRV87 fits as well in the 100series if you want an extra 15Ah. Was working on a friend's TD100series today and he had one on the drivers side as his auxillary.
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Follow Up By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 00:09

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 00:09
Thanks Phil

I will keep it in mind. I have not tried a 13 inch battery in the LC100.

Regards

Derek.
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank U (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 04:06

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 04:06
I agree with Alex - I have a 90 Amp Hour FullRiver AGM in my petorl 80 - temps with an IR gun shows the battery are usualy around 65 -75 degree's C

It has been there for 3 years and still passes all load tests and capacity tests.

I agree they say that life can be shortened by heat over 55 degree's C but I can tell you that they still well and truly outlast standard lead acid's in my experience.

You alkso need to keep in mind that lead acid batteries have a shortened life usualy due to sulfation - cause by the battery not being fully charged - A standard lead acid battery will generally never get 100% full charged from a cars alternator(unless you have a multistage controler on your alternator which is expensive).

An AGM WILL full charge and will charge FASTER off an alternator - so perhaps this is one of the factors as to why even with the extreme heat, AGM's are outlasting standard lead acid type batteries.
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Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 09:20

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 09:20
Frank
FWC batteries will give the longest life of any battery if charged correctly and maintained properly.

Suphation is caused by no charge not some charge.

The only AGM batteries that will charge faster than a FWC is the high Re combination type AGM because of less resistance allowing high amp input.

No battery is fully charged by an alternator unless you drive a very long way as the regulator is designed to cut back the charge at around 75% which is what is needed to start the vehicle.

FWC batteries can be charged at 14.7 and most alternators do not achieve over 14.4V some less but some now get 14.7V to cater more for calcium batteries.

Its horses for courses and there is a lot of myths and misconceptions about batteries.

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Follow Up By: Member - Frank U (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:11

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:11
I have to disagree - Sulphation occurrs in standard lead acid batteries th minute they are NOT 100% charged. The less charge they have, the higher the amount of sulphation that occurs - it's a chemical reaction nd the number 1 killer of battery life.

You may like to read an interesting article below

http://www.fridge-and-solar.net/agm.htm

Also, Colyn Rivers has a very good book which covers these kinds of subjects.

Also, AGM's don't lose anywhere as much capacity when not in use. ie. standard eep cycle for instance typicaly lose 10 percent per month versus AGM's at 3 percent - so there are other benefits for people who are not using their trucks as a daily driver for instance.

I agree - there are a lot of misconceptions about batteries including that heat from under a bonnet in most cases will shorten the life of an AGM to less than that of having a standard lead acid battery in General.
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:21

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:21
>I agree - there are a lot of misconceptions about batteries including
>that heat from under a bonnet in most cases will shorten the life of
>an AGM to less than that of having a standard lead acid battery in
>General.

Try not to twist the words of others when you post Frank - what you describe above is not what anyone has said.

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:39

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:39
Frank
I have to admit I agree with you on the principle of Sulphation which accelerates with the more inefficient the charge is but it applies to all batteries not just FWC and remember you can maintain FWC to perform you cant maintain a sealed AGM battery so its up to the human element as to how long a FWC battery lasts.

I have seen 20Year designed life gels stuffed in four years by sulphation.

BTW shelf life is another myth how old is the battery when you buy it and if its shelf life was so good why isnt the warranty longer.



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Follow Up By: Mainey (wa) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:54

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:54
Most batteries probably get stuffed by inefficient owner practices, as in being left in a partially charged condition and also discharged too low, too often.

Mainey . . .
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 19:10

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 19:10
Wheeleybin:

What does "FWC" stand for? It's not a term I am familiar with and Google returns zero useful information.

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 20:54

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 20:54
Sorry Mike
It means Flooded Wet Cell.
I take batteries in 4 categories
Flooded wet cell. (Normal Batteries)
Sealed Wet cell. (So Called non maintenance)
AGM and
Gel.
I might have to rethink that shortly and add Carbon Fibre.

Plus Northstar are developing a new battery designed by the Caterpillar battery design team and it looks exciting but a bit to go yet but it is calimed to be lighter and higher capacity than anything currently available..
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Reply By: TrevorDavid- Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 19:54

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 19:54
Same as Phil, Exide Extreme's for me.

Regards

TDB
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Follow Up By: Geoff M (QLD) - Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 21:26

Saturday, Jan 26, 2008 at 21:26
Just let me give you my little saga on Exide Extremes .....

Purchased a N70EX from Kmart on 22/6/06.

Everything fine until (approx) 11/07 when it appeared something was wrong on a weekend camping trip with the 40L Engel running the battery down to 11.35 VDC after only one day.

Got home and put Cteck charger on for about 10 hours .... hydrometer readings ....... all 1275 except one at 1120. Off to Kmart with original purchase receipt. After testing with their tester .... " Sorry sir, can't find anything wrong"

Me .... "What were your hydrometer readings?"

Kmart ... "We don't have a hydrometer!"

Me ... "Call Exide"

Kmart ..."No"

Me .. "Then I will"

I called Exide on my mobile and spoke to a very nice lady who then talked to the service manager at Kmart who then reluctantly gave me a new battery (24 month replacement warranty).

Asked to check voltage on replacement battery .... 12.26VDC.

Back to Exide and they told me to go to a Repco outlet that they directed me to.

At Repco they produced a Champion Extreme and guess what the static voltage was ..... 12.39 with hydrometer reading across the board of 12.25.

Repco ..... " They're all like this"

Me ... "Not mine"

Bottom line is that Exide refuse to do anything for me and I am going to take them to small claims court because I'm tired of B/S warranties from "so called" reputable companies"

Beware of EXIDE.

PS: This is just the Readers Digest version of the story, but I'll keep you informed of the outcome.

Geoff
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 00:24

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 00:24
Geoff,
Is there anything wrong with the new battery, apart from the fact that it needs a top-up charge?
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 08:45

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 08:45
Geoff whats the problem if all cells are the same hydro wise (around 1250) but the static volts are down a tad? That normally wouldn't worry me with a battery off the rack.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Kath - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 10:47

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 10:47
So pleased RD leave us alone these days Geoff, I don't know they are a good resource.

Bonz, like your tag mate ;-))) Just got to have some one to carry the other part. Not that I need that now. LOL

Phil, I need to upgrade batteries some time in Kath. Does your mate use a dual battery system to manage them or does he run them together all the time?
Cheers,
Who?
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 11:11

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 11:11
Gday John,
I did the install for my mate. We put a Rotronics MH10 isolator on the drivers side inside mudguard (plenty of room). We disconnected the pos on the drivers side (it feeds something, can't remember what) and ran a thick lead to the Rotronics, and the return lead back to the drivers side pos. Then covered everything with copious amounts of corrugated tubing and tape. He takes power off either battery at the Rotronics terminals. His preference for batteries was a 700cca cranking battery on the passengers side and a 115Ah (13inch) deep cycle as the aux.

In mine, one system doesn't do everything, so I've got two systems between identical Exides. I have the simple switch (type with the red key) if I want to keep them paralleled permanently (I do this 95% of the time) or if I want to use the winch; and I have a Rotronics isolator wired in as well if I want to stay put for a couple of days and preserve one battery for starting. To change the system its simply a matter of lifting the bonnet and flicking a switch. I think the batteries last longer if I keep them paralleled (less power for starting, and less power draw from each on overnight camps, and better recharging).

Cheers
phil
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Reply By: Member - neville G (QLD) - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 07:42

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 07:42
Thanks for the reply,s,
Have checked that site Doug and as we have a local dealer I will talk to him next week. Has anyone used the Optima in a 100 series?. I
have both batteries in paralel and have a low voltage cutout switch in the line, this has worked well with my original 60lt. Engel but feel that I will require a little more reserve particularly as I will run one fridge as a freezer.
Cheers and thanks, Nev.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 10:37

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 10:37
Nev,
Maybe for future reference and reassurance, I've had a single N70 down to 12.15 volts and it still started the 1HD-FTE first flick. (Temp was about 10degreesC).

The 60litre Engels used a lot more power than the later F-series 40litre, so you may find that power consumption doesn't change a whole lot.

Do your homework on the Optima before you spend $800+ on two batteries. The capacity (Amphours) are relatively low for the size of the battery - you won't get more than 75amphours each. They are gels and not AGMs. All the charging information is given at room temperature of 25degrees (hence Mike Harding's warnings). And I think the warranty is only 12 months.
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Follow Up By: Richard W (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 06:27

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 06:27
Neville,

I've had a couple of Optima yellow top 55AH but only as auxilliary batteries in the rear of vehicles and the warranty is 2 years as I had one go at 2.5 years. One cell failed and I was given a discount on a new one.
I found it didn't run the Engel 40L long enough without recharging so replaced it with a 100AH AGM. The optima is now in the camper trailer as its only needed for a small flouro light.
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Reply By: wheeleybin - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 12:28

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 12:28
The Optima battery is definately an AGM not a gel and is was developed bad in the eighties for the US Army.

To the chap with the 8 year old Full River well done but when are you going to use them as a battery life is based on cycles and if you were cycling them they would be dead.

I did not state mythical or otherwise figures I stated experience whereas the use was full charge ,full discharge and in a 24 hour period that is hard cycling not paper facts.

The best AGMs supposedly available and they cycled around 300 times at 100% and died.

This is experience like your statement and you have done exceptionally well dollar for dollar.
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Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 12:41

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 12:41
The word bad should be "back"in my previous post.

Sorry
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 14:08

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 14:08
"Optima battery is definately an AGM not a gel"
Wheeleybin, I stand corrected. Its interesting that Optima don't call their batteries AGM - maybe for marketing reasons???
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Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 15:40

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 15:40
Dont say "I stand corrected" you were unknowingly misled it sounds better.

The optima is an absorbed glas mat spirally wound where most others are absorbed glas mat flat plate.

The Optima is potentially the highest recombination battery and can take potentially the best high charge rate.

The downfall is too small a capacity for the price and the posts eventually come off.

I have had one as a back up in one car for 8Years since 2000 with the main battery a FWC a supposed No No and its still working fine but it wont be long till the post falls off .

Now that cost double the Full River price so that is $50 per year so axel is out in front and I look like falling over in the straight but I have run a 40L s/s fridge 24/7 for 4 of those years .
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Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 16:04

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 16:04
Optima Make reference to Gel Cell technology and they do use a paste which they then call by common name
Separator/Pasted paper Fibrous Glass.
This is commonly refered to as Absorbed Glass Mat or AGM as we know it.
The information can be gleaned from the Material Safety Data Sheet for all Optima Batteries.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 22:46

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 22:46
There's a fundamental difference between flat-plate AGMs and the spiral plate AGMs like the Optima.

In flat plate AGMs the electrolyte is in the mats which are separated from the case by an airgap, preventing heat produced by overcharging from being conducted away. In Gels and wetcells the electrolyte is in direct contact with the case, allowing heat to be conducted away.

This is where the high cost of Optimas pays off - the spiral plates are a tight fit in the case, allowing heat to be conducted away. It also means that they're more resistant to vibration - hence the military use in vehicles and planes. though real military AGMs have metal cases to provide better heat conduction out of the battery.

If you have an Alternator that's producing the right output voltage for your battery and it's temperature compensated to reduce voltage as the engine compartment heats up, it will not overcharge your AGM at high temperatures.
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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 08:34

Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 08:34
Wheelybin , as stated previously , REAL life use , not a spec sheet figure , perhaps if you looked after your batts a bit better you would get more than the mythical /theory lifespan [300 cycles ] only a fool lets his batteries FULLY discharge and shorten the lifespan.
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 10:57

Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 10:57
If anyone is ever foolish enough to ask me to design another bridge across the Yarra I must remember to tell them we don't need to mess around with all those poofter beam stress calculations and data sheets because my mate George has had the exact same reinforced concrete beam supporting a bridge on his farm for the past 20 years and he regularly overloads it by 100%

You need to keep in mind Axel that your "real life" experience of this product is limited to a very, very, very small number of samples and you have no idea how this product, or other samples of it, behaves in areas outside your own experience - that is why manufacturers provide specifications for their products, they _guarantee_ the product will work according to those specs take it outside the spec and all bets are off.

If a manufacturer was able to provide wider specs for his product with confidence don't you think he would do so?

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 11:48

Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 11:48
Mike H , tis not a matter of any foolishness of design be it bridges or batteries , [ though whoever designed the Gateway bridge in Brisbane realy needs his /her head examined] , it is a case in point that whenever batteries are a forum subject YOU allways say that AGM batteries will not survive underbonnet use simply because the "specs" say so ,,, there are many on this forum and other forums who use AGMs under bonnet , have never yet read a complaint that service life of an AGM was cut short due to heat ,
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 12:03

Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 12:03
>YOU allways say that AGM batteries will not survive underbonnet use

What I say, Axel, is that they are not specified for underbonnet use because the temperatures encountered in this environment exceed the maximum specification of all AGM batteries I have encountered and using them under such conditions will reduce their lifespan. That's not just what I say it's what the people who design and make the damn things say!

That does not mean every AGM battery on the planet will fail in this situation, some may work for years others may fail in a few weeks you have no way of knowing which particular samples from which particular batch from which particular manufacture will behave in which particular manner once you go outside the specifications - end of story.

This is engineering: we don't guess things, we don't make assumptions we apply scientific practice. Some years ago I was involved in the design of an implantable defibrillator which used very advanced batteries - had I decided I knew better than the manufacturers of that battery because a mate of mine had used one and my product had failed I would have (quite properly) been on a manslaughter charge for negligence.

Finally Axel; if specifications are optional why do you suggest

>only a fool lets his batteries FULLY discharge and shorten
>the lifespan.

Surely the manufacturers specification for "fully discharged" can be safely ignored?

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 18:20

Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 18:20
Axel
If you do not understand the application for the batteries or understand battery cycling then you are not in a position to call anyone a fool.

The postings that have been put on this thread by good people are meant to help people understand more about things but itseems with you that would be a waste of time and maybe I am a fool for even trying.


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Reply By: Mainey (wa) - Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 18:05

Sunday, Jan 27, 2008 at 18:05
If you use Exide Extremes as a "Deep Cycle" or "cycling" battery to run accessories... then their warranty is only six (6) MONTHS.

Exide state the Extreme is a Passenger Vehicle battery and NOT a storage battery on their website->
Exide PASSENGER VEHICLE batteries

You will notice Passenger vehicle, Storage and Deep Cycle batteries are all on separate pages to avoid any confusion, after all if you wanted a Cranking battery why would you be interested in looking at the tech specs for a Deep Cycle or AGM battery and vice versa!

If Exide remove the Extreme from the "passenger battery" list and label it as "Deep Cycle" or "Cycling" battery and are prepared give it a 12 month warranty, then it's worth considering, but with it's present tech specs it will never happen, it's designed, built and also sold by Exide as a Cranking battery for a PASSENGER VEHICLE nothing more, why do you think exide only give the Extreme only 6 months warranty when used as a "cycling" battery ??


Sure you use a Cranking battery to run a fridge - and you can use *some* Deep Cycle as Cranking batteries too.

However, a Deep Cycle or AGM battery will run a fridge much more efficiently than a Cranking battery will, that's not just my opinion, that's a absolute, undeniable fact of life.

( I'm not saying it can't be done - I'm saying there are better battery choices out there that WILL work far more efficiently and cost much LESS $$$ in the long term )
Mainey...
AnswerID: 283968

Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 06:28

Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 06:28
Mainey youve hit the nail on the head IN THE LONG TERM.
The cost of a battery is not how much the initial cost is but how much it costs per amp over the life of the battery .
There is no blah blah blah in this it is understanding how deep your pockets have to be in the Long Term with inefficient batteries.
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FollowupID: 548733

Reply By: Mainey (wa) - Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 09:32

Monday, Jan 28, 2008 at 09:32
Neville,
have found this information on the Century website for the "Severe Service" battery

LINK:-> Century SEVERE SERVICE battery


LINK:-> Century battery gives their version of Cranking V's Deep Cycle battery

Mainey . . .
AnswerID: 284036

Follow Up By: Member - neville G (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 07:06

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 07:06
Thanks for that Mainey, I have gone with the Century, severe service, I think they will do the job. Paid $175ea, so saved quite a bit compared with other "Hi Tech" types.
Cheers, Nev.
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FollowupID: 549203

Reply By: Richard W (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 06:16

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 06:16
Neville,

I replaced my two standard Toyota batteries with the Champion N70ZZ and N70ZZL after one went at Karumba at 2.5 years. The L indicates the terminals are reversed which is required in the TD100 to fit the wiring loom between the two batteries.

Didn't have much choice in Mt Isa but they are manufactured by Exide in any case. I'm no auto elecrician but they seem to be doing the job OK.

I have a 100AH AGM in the rear running through a Pirahna isolator for the fridge etc.



Regards Richard
AnswerID: 284449

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