getting tyre off rim

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 18:31
ThreadID: 54087 Views:2110 Replies:7 FollowUps:8
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hi all
in the flinders ranges earlier in the week came a cross a cruiser in the middle of nowhere it had a shredded tyre guy trying to break bead using hi lift jack had been at it for about an hour with no luck asked did he need help which was accepted his wife and 8 year old was under a tree in the shade we used my tyre pliers had the bead done in very short time got the first side of tyer off very easily but to get the other side to come off we tried every thing tyre levers mallet plenty of oil wd 40 soapy water wood not come off after hour of swearing and cursing wife suggested cut it off. so with wire cutters and knife in short time off .put new casing on in no time. tyer wood not bead so out with petrol and liter made short work of beading.guy had slashed spare wheel that was on a rim earlier in day hence this drama.my question why this tyer wood not come off never had this problem before changed plenty of tyers in the past but not like this one . it was a dunlop grandeur LT any suggestions appreciated regards al
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Reply By: Footloose - Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 18:41

Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 18:41
I've seen a few that have literally burnt themselves onto the rim, but you didn't mention that it had almost caught fire (until you put the new one on.)
AnswerID: 284781

Reply By: Member - Josh B (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 21:33

Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 21:33
on some rims the tyres can only come off one side. when you look at the rim (without tyre is easier but can be seen with it on) one side of the bead will be closer to a lip in the rim and should come off this side. the other side will be a lot futher from the bead and if you try to go this way you will get one side off (not easy but will come off) and the second one will not come off. like you said mosst times you will either have to try put the trye back on and go other way or cut the tyre. been there and done it the hard way and cutting a good tyre is not cheap. hope this helps
AnswerID: 284834

Reply By: Member - Barnesy (SA) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 06:48

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 06:48
How can petrol and lighter help with rebeading a rim?

Barnesy
AnswerID: 284868

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 08:06

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 08:06
Last resort practise , which I've seen work.

Little petrol in the tyre ,it fumes and you light it and it explodes inside the tyre blowing tyre back on.

Several other variations using aerostart etc

Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: Member - Chris R (NSW) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 09:17

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 09:17
Nice pics your site Barnsey.

Cheers
Chris
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 09:07

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 09:07
Hi Al

I don't have a satisfactory solution to the problem of getting the second side of the tyre off the rim either.

Over time some tyres go hard and they become difficult and I have also cut a couple off which is hard work thru the steel coords.

I seen many variations of high lift jack and jacking of towbar
for beadbreaking and these work when everything is good but
in a real situation they so often can't do the job particularly
when rust is involved.
Proper beadbreakers are the way to go to start with but even these fall short getting off the second side.

The problem seems to be the normal tyre lever levers can't be pushed down enough without hitting onto the rim.

I have a couple of levers with better bends in them and they sort of half work.

I was thinking that some lever with a double bend in it or special
shape that prevent the lever pulling in against the rim under pressure might assist here.

To get the second bead off my brother stands the wheel up pushes the tyre over and hits it expertly with a rubber mallet.

Makes me cry, every time I see it happen as it usually occurs after I have been stuffing around for 1/2 hour without a result.
Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: Member - Chris R (NSW) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 09:43

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 09:43
Try this for future ref.

To get second bead over front rim (ie bead is already released from its own rim) I use 'winkling' technique instead of brute force and sweat.

Winkling consists of inserting one lever radially under tyre bead from rear and levering up and over the wheel rim. While maintaning the lifting pressure on this lever, insert the second lever's toe tangentially into the gap between the tyre bead and the wheel (ie transition zone) and gently ease the lubricated tyre bead over the rim.

The second lever's concave curve is innermost - following the curve of the wheel. ie The point of its toe is in contact with the wheel and the outside curve of the lever 'the heel' is in contact with the bead near the point of transition.

It is a simple matter of easing the bead over the rim while maintaining pressure on the first lever.

Sorry no pictures - you can throw away the mallet for this operation.

I've not used the lighter method for seating beads. Have always found that the standard Arb pump was sufficient - but always remove the tyre valve to ensure maximum air flow until seated.

Hope this helps

Chris

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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 10:01

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 10:01
Interesting input Chris , I will have to try something like that.

One of issues I've found that makes it hard is that the lever tends
to lift the tyre/wheel off the ground.

Do you think the technique would work or be made easier if the faulty tyre/wheel was mounted in the spare position (on back door of a patrol) which would stop wheel movement ?

Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: Member - Chris R (NSW) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 20:00

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 20:00
I had considered how to use the spare wheel carrier and could see possibilities similar in principle to that found in the professional tyre shops - ie a long lever pivoting around a fixed centre with various attachments. But length of lever, potential to have to mount and remount the wheel for the four operations were enough to send me off on other problems.

When winkling, the tyre is stood on its edge towards vertical using the radial lever as the means of holding it up. As the tangential level is worked, the weight of the wheel causes it to eventually fall out of the tyre.

Best regards

Chris
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Follow Up By: Member - Chris R (NSW) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 20:08

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 20:08
WHOOPS - should have stated that the levers I use are tyre pliers type - ie fairly long curved tapered toe. Some others are rather stumpy and angular and might not work as winklers.

Chris
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Reply By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 09:35

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 09:35
Several years ago I purchased an R & R Beadbreaker, and i have never had a tyre that it wouldnt break the bead, it may be a little slower than tyrepliers, but it requires little effort.
I now repair most of my own flats, on a small fleet of vehicles and trailers. Has well and truely paid for itself.
When we went to the show to purchase the beadbreaker, my wife and I watched the demo's for tyrepliers and beadbreaker, and while trying to make up my mind, she said to me that which one would i be able to use in the scrub in 20 years time?
We bought the beadbreaker.

Cheers Pesty
AnswerID: 284894

Reply By: Member -Signman - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 12:25

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 12:25
By reading your 'story'- you "got the first side of the tyer off very easily" ...I assume you cleared the bead off that side ???
I reckon you should be breaking the bead(s) on BOTH sides first before attempting to start removing the bead from the rim !!
AnswerID: 284923

Follow Up By: Member - Chris R (NSW) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 20:05

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 20:05
Bit ambiguous, but I figured he had broken the bead on both sides - as it's near impossible to get one bead off if the other is still in tact. But if you did manage that trick, then breaking the second bead should be helped by the tyre deformation created.

Cheers
Chris
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Reply By: obee - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 21:31

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 21:31
2 x 2 inch sections of angle iron do it for me and they are easy to pack. Just hammer them in between the rim and tyre going around one after the other.

Tyres that have been on for long long time are a pig. Deteriorating rubber and rust dictate brute force.

Owen
AnswerID: 285007

Follow Up By: Member - Chris R (NSW) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 10:24

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 10:24
Owen,m
your method no doubt works....but give my method a go - it works with less sweat believe me

Cheers

Chris
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