Hi lIft JAcks and what do i need?

Submitted: Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 10:00
ThreadID: 54777 Views:7861 Replies:8 FollowUps:12
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I have a Gu patrol with factory steel bar and i am looking at getting a high lift jack. Besides the range of jacks available ther is the range of accessories.

My bull bar does not have jack slots and i still have the plastic rear bumber so will the jack on its own work? Or do i need to consider some of the other accessories?

What do other people do?

Alan
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Reply By: Wizard1 - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 12:44

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 12:44
There is an accessory called a Lift Mate which attaches to your wheel. The jack is then used to lift the vehicle by the wheel.

ARB stock them.

Lift Mate
AnswerID: 288608

Reply By: howie - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 12:53

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 12:53
have you considered an exhaust jack?
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 15:27

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 15:27
I cut two T-slots into my steel bullbar.

I have made jacking points for the rear, but thats probably easier to do on a traytop.
AnswerID: 288629

Follow Up By: Groove - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 16:46

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 16:46
I read once (might have been here) that you shouldnt use a hilift jack on an airbag compatable bull bar. Now I cant see any obvious reason why not but has anyone heard this?
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - andrew B (Kununurra) - Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 13:19

Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 13:19
My arb bar is designed for an air bag vehicle, has highlift jacking points, and has been used quite a bit with no detrimental effects.

I doubt ARB would put and advertise high lift jacking points if it was a problem.

Cheers andrew
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 16:55

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 16:55
Think seriously if you really need one, never used one or been with anyone who has used one in 5yrs.

2 or 4 good jacking plates are a good idea, 1inch thick by 30-40cm sq blocks. as big as you can fit in the space in the car :)

Most you see bolted to the car driving round the city never come off.
AnswerID: 288636

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 18:45

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 18:45
Depends on the sort of travel you do.
Mine gets used most trips - its the only beadbreaker that I use.
Its my backup jack for the flimsy Toyota jack. Its the only jack I have that will jack the chassis high enough to repair suspension.
Never used it for getting unbogged.

Agree 100% about the jacking plates. I have a round one that fits inside a 16" wheel, so you can use a spare as the base for the jack, if you're jacking up the body and the ground is soft.
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Reply By: PeterInSa - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 17:33

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 17:33
I made a fitting that I can use in place of the tow bar tongue for rear lift. ie approx 50mm x 50mm of 5mm thick tube 150mm long. This section went into the Towbar fitting on the cruiser and held in with a bolt/nut. A large piece of tube also approx 150mm long was slid over the the last 50mm of the tube that fits into the towbar and welded and a slot cut into the end (underneath) to fit the vertical part of the jack step. The jack held in place with a bolt/nut.

For the front I used a 100mm (h) x 50mm (w) and 100mm (d) piece of tube with a plate on the end with a T hole cut out for the jack step. Cannot recall the thickness of the tube but suggest it would need to be at least 3mm thick

Stability. On the bottom of the Tube welded a section with a hole in it to bolt onto tow hole underneath the ARB bull bar. On the top section welded a U section to fit the bullbar upright on either side of the radiator. (One fitting does both sides)To keep the Jack from coming out of the tube, when ready to do a lift, a bolt from either side of the tube thru a hole underneath the jack step.
About 1hr of effort, if you have the tools, steel and motivation + painting time.

OK a picture is worth a thousand words, but I am not into digital transfers as yet.

Is it worth it ? It looks tough but... you still have to make/buy the fitting for a hi lift jack say on your spare wheel, and in 5 years of carrying the jack around I have never used it. I would only get this setup if you go bush on your own. (Which we do sometimes)
Peter
AnswerID: 288641

Follow Up By: Louie the fly - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 17:58

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 17:58
Kinda like this?

Image Could Not Be Found


I made one like this. Tried it at home and it worked OK but have never used it in anger. I've only used a Hi Lift 3 times in 20 yrs. With the one I made you can jack up the middle of the rear and push the car sideways to get it out of a rut / bog, or simply lift it to get stuff under the wheels. When you push it sideways it's far enough away from the car that there is minimal risk of panel damage.
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 21:39

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 21:39
Louie

Did you draw that? I like it

Cheers

Richard
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Follow Up By: Louie the fly - Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 17:37

Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 17:37
I draw everything I make. a) I have a plan to work to, & b) I can get parts laser cut from the drawings. I wouldn't use it to jack the car up and change a tyre cept in an emergency situation. I made it with the intention of only using it to get the car up and clear it from a bog. As someone mentioned below about the instability of jacking from the middle, thats part of the design brief.

Also made this before my last trip - recovery point for towbar. Used it a few times while on Fraser Island, recovering my mate's Patrol...

Image Could Not Be Found
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 20:58

Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 20:58
What cad program do you use? I use Turbo Cad to tight to fork out over a grand.. :-)

you are a lot better than me with it I only draw in third angle 2D manly because thats how I was taught back in the 70s on paper ... LOL

I like it

Cheers

Richard
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Follow Up By: Louie the fly - Saturday, Feb 23, 2008 at 13:13

Saturday, Feb 23, 2008 at 13:13
We run 3 seats of Solidworks 2008 and 2 seats of Autodesk Inventor. These parts were created in Solidworks which I much prefer to use. I think it is more intuitive and easier to drive than Inventor. We use it for special purpose machinery design as well as general drafting. I reckon it's quicker and easier to produce a solid model and then a drawing than it is to just produce a drawing these days, particularly if you want to prototype and make ongoing changes. I also learned on paper and a drawing machine at trade school in early 80's but quickly changed to CAD during its mass introduction into industry.

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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 21:17

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 21:17
Jacking up the middle of the towbar won't help a lot as its probably the most unstable place to jack from. I had a Prado with plastic bumper - I welded up two highlift jack points and mounted them each end of the towbar.

I use 50x25x3 steel and cut a gap in the bottom half, so the jack slips in nice and tight and stable.
AnswerID: 288707

Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 21:43

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 21:43
Phil

My Hi lift a Jack all cannot get the rear wheels off the ground using the ARB attachment and Kaymar rear bar, and I weigh 92kg.. and thats not funny

jack rated at 3000kg

Cheers

Richard
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 21:59

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 21:59
Gday Richard,

So either the rear end of your Troopie weighs over 3000kgs or the mechanical advantage of your Hilift is less than 30:1 :-))


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Reply By: Alan S (WA) - Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 22:07

Thursday, Feb 21, 2008 at 22:07
Thanks all. it would appear that that for the money i probably wont get a lot of use out of one.

I also dropped into a 4x4 shop today and asked the same question. The sales person was actually honest and said basically with my vehicle that really there wasnt any real jack points therefore a highlift jack wasnt an option.

He suggested i was better off with a exhaust jack. He must have been honest as he didnt have any to sell so he wasnt just trying a line.

Once you add up all the accessories such as some where to mount it, a exhaust jack makes more sense financially. You can also use it sand, where i tend to be more often.

Thanks all for your input.

Alan
AnswerID: 288733

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 14:44

Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 14:44
Alan,
If only an exhaust jack was the answer....

Where can you put it?? I have the 4T jack, and the only place this is strong enough to support it is under chassis rails and towbar, and the chassis rails are pretty skinny. Once I used it, it slid sideways and hit a body bolt and made a big hissing sound. Exhaust, fuel tanks, sump are all no good for me.

Ever tried putting one under when the vehicle's bogged to the diffs?

A 4wd mechanic also warned me not to use it with a turbodiesel - his explanation sounded good, and I've since forgotten why. I adapted mine, so it blows up with the compressor, rather than the exhaust, but its the one piece of equipment that I've never used in anger.
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Reply By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 10:03

Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 10:03
Alan, I agree with your assessment, largely ornamental,heavy &
dangerous. I use one on farm with bulk bins, tractors etc but dont take it touring. I suggest a trolley jack is more useful than an exhaust one. Still works if engine dont...oldbaz.
AnswerID: 288783

Follow Up By: PeterInSa - Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 14:09

Friday, Feb 22, 2008 at 14:09
I definitely agree on having a Trolley Jack, have one in a long draw, under the false floor in the Cruiser. Needed my mates T/Jack as well to change a wheel in a bad location 2 years ago.

Peter
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