two way radio fitting precautions?

Submitted: Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 15:18
ThreadID: 55043 Views:2589 Replies:3 FollowUps:6
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I am about to fit a two way radio (uhf and hf) into my new 79 series LC (4.5L v8).....I have done this on numerous occasions in previous vehicles as I have changed vehicles over the years and never really taken a lot of notice re some of these statements....no issues...BUT

BUT having just taken delivery of my pride and joy 79 series I read the book and have decided to be cautious as Owners Manual states" ....".....could affect electronic systems such as fuel injection pump system and electronic engine control system....check with your Toyota dealer for precautionary measures or special instructions...."

Before anyone jumps in about why dont I contact Toyota ..I will...but there are plenty of very cluey people on this site and I value their comments as well

what exactly can go wrong?,,,what are the preventive measures...both in installation and operating?

Thanks


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Reply By: Footloose - Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 15:49

Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 15:49
For a start the common rail injection system could make your HF unuseable. There's also a slight possibility that selcalling while mobile could bring the vehicle to a halt...not great if overtaking at the time.
Fuse both leads for radios at the bettery end. Keep the HF aerial away from the front end. Use torroids on the injection control box etc etc etc.

Good luck.
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Follow Up By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 16:05

Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 16:05
G'day Footloose

Thanks for reply. I have rarely used hf whilst mobile and so I simply won't from now on so that should sort out ay potential fuel injection problems.

I always fuse everything both ends and dont ever use selcall so that shouldnt be an issue either. The aerial is going behind the cab up against the tray cab guard...so I must ask what the hell is a torroid?

thanks
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 16:18

Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 16:18
Sorry mate I was doing multiple things at once. I should have said ferrite bead clamps. If you do a Google on how to minimize interference from a CR diesel, you'll find how far some have gone.
I was lusting after a new vehicle also, until I found out about the interference :(((
Still, if you don't use it mobile, then there's no problem :))
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Reply By: obee - Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 15:53

Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 15:53
I thinks its a bit like the airline industry who claim there is a chance using electronic devices may interfere with the plane's navigation. the odds of it happening are very slim but they want to cover the proverbial bum just in case.

Imagine a vehicle manufacture and provider to the mining and agricultural industries supplying a vehicle that wont support a two way.

The only thing you can do is not place the antenna right hard up against the vehicle computer box and I am certain you aint gonna do that.

I am certain too that Toyata wont tell you not to fit a radio.

Owen
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Follow Up By: obee - Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 15:56

Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 15:56
whoops I didnt read hf when I shoulda. Heaps more power in a hf radio or at least the one you will be fitting. Same again but do try and put the antenna as far away as practical from the computer stuff and make sure you got good earthing.

Owen
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Reply By: Mike Harding - Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 16:20

Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 16:20
The UHF doesn't worry me much - a direct supply (pos and neg) from the battery and mount the antenna somewhere with a decent ground.

When installing high power (100W) HF radios in a vehicle there are five basic and very important rules: earthing, earthing, earthing, earthing and, finally, earthing.

Again; direct pos and neg from the battery (good fat cable), fuses in _both_ pos and neg. Antenna mount with excellent earth. Check the engine is properly earthed to the chassis, many earth the exhaust system too.

The control electronics of modern vehicles are, usually, very well designed in regard to disturbance from external RF fields BUT they are not immune to them and 100W of RF at HF frequencies has much more than the minimum capability to kill your EMU in the right circumstances. Avoid running the antenna co-ax parallel with vehicle wiring for any distance, check your EMU (and any other electronic modules you are aware of) have the appropriate metal coves in place and ensure those covers have a good earth.

A Web Site For Mobile Amateur Radio Operators

Let us know how it all goes.

Mike Harding

PS. Did I mention earthing? :)


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Follow Up By: Martyn (WA) - Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 19:28

Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 19:28
Great web site that Mike, thanks.
Keep the shiny side up

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Follow Up By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 21:31

Friday, Feb 29, 2008 at 21:31
Thanks for that Mike...interesting site....what a minefield sometimes I think ignorance is bliss!.........maybe revert to smoke signals

anyway I will install over the coming weeks and post results

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Follow Up By: Member - John H (WA) - Tuesday, Mar 04, 2008 at 11:23

Tuesday, Mar 04, 2008 at 11:23
As a matter of interest, where are you planning to install the HF unit ? I've just got hold of a secondhand barrett 950 (great having a neighbor who works for barrett). Now I've just got to figure out where to put everthing.

John
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