How long is a piece of string?

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 01:53
ThreadID: 55068 Views:2150 Replies:17 FollowUps:8
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I know everyone is thinking about a different piece...but Im talking about this one!.....
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Reply By: Member - Barnesy - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 02:47

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 02:47
What one?
My piece is 344mm long.
AnswerID: 290162

Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Sydney. - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:37

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:37
Get that Magellan working with Ozi ?
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Reply By: Member - andrew B (Kununurra) - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 07:04

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 07:04
Generally about 50mm shorter than you need it to be!
AnswerID: 290170

Reply By: Saharaman (aka Geepeem) - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 07:42

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 07:42
15 metres -

(The last ball of string I got at Bunnings was 15m)
AnswerID: 290172

Reply By: Member - Alex B - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:10

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:10
It's always twice as long from its center to its end!

cheers
Alex :-)
AnswerID: 290176

Reply By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:17

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:17
Shorter than a shoelace.
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

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Follow Up By: nowimnumberone - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 11:43

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 11:43
what size shoe is it.
i just checked in our shoe cupboard and there is quite a difference in shoe lace sizes.
could you please be more specific
some people might get confused. sir-confuse-alot
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 15:16

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 15:16
the shoe size is immaterial, the shoelace is eternal, it has an identity of its own
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

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Reply By: Member - Willie , Sydney. - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:33

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:33
Metric or imperial ?
AnswerID: 290184

Reply By: Axel [ the real one ] - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:35

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:35
same as a pull through , "as long as it needs to be "
AnswerID: 290185

Reply By: Member - Willie , Sydney. - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:36

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:36
Actually, your question reminds me of another , of equal significance.



Why is there air ?
AnswerID: 290188

Follow Up By: Member - Glenn G (QLD) - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:40

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 08:40
If we keep going this Tread (string) will keep getting longer !
Is that what you mean ?

Giffo
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Follow Up By: Patrolman Pat - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 09:08

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 09:08
I don't believe there is any. I've never seen it.
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Follow Up By: Member - Poppy (QLD) - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 15:50

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 15:50
Hi Patrolman Pat, haven't seen you on here for ages where you been hiding?
Ray
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Reply By: Mainey (wa) - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 10:18

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 10:18
That one is the wrong colour, and the other one is a lot longer !!

Was just wondering why not just use it, you could cut it off at the correct length ???

Mainey . . .
AnswerID: 290207

Reply By: nowimnumberone - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 11:45

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 11:45
i cant measure mine its to long for the normal tape measure but its about 3 house blocks long.
AnswerID: 290222

Reply By: Gob & Denny - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 12:10

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 12:10
i thought everybody knew the answer ???
its trhe same length from the middle to each end

steve
AnswerID: 290227

Reply By: Louie the fly - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 15:04

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 15:04
Don't know but if you measure it's length it is equal to 6 times the circumference of the hole in a donut. You can also use it, with the right map, to measure the distance from here to the Back of Burke. It also has something to do with the amount of time it takes paint to dry, or St Kilda to win a premiership.

Had a ball once. On the box it said 70m
AnswerID: 290240

Reply By: Member - Kim M (VIC) - Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 20:57

Saturday, Mar 01, 2008 at 20:57
Gidday Hairy

If you measure a piece of string from start to finish, I'd imagine a conclusion would result from that activity. You'll need a tape measure, or some other calibrated device to acheive this.

Give Leucippus and Democritus a ring. They know more about this than me.

Whilst the length of a piece of string will no doubt be discussed by the Dudd Government shortly, can you provide an answer to this vexing conundrum please:

I've been to bed with some good looking women, but next morning.......

LOL

Kim
AnswerID: 290288

Reply By: Richard Kovac - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 00:21

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 00:21
This article is about the unit of length. For other uses of "meter", see Meter (disambiguation).
1 metre = SI units
100 cm 1000 mm
US customary / Imperial units
3.281 ft 39.37 in
The metre or meter[1] (symbol: m) is the fundamental unit of length in the International System of Units (SI). The metre was originally defined by a prototype object meant to represent 1/10,000,000 the distance between the poles and the Equator. Today, it is defined as 1/299,792,458 of a light-second.

Because it is the base unit of length in the SI, all SI units that involve length (such as area or speed) are defined relative to the metre. Additionally, because the metre is the only SI base unit used to measure a vector (e.g., displacement), all vector units are defined relative to the metre. Decimal multiples and submultiples of the metre – such as kilometre (1000 metres) and centimetre (0.01 metres) – can be formed by adding SI prefixes to metre (see the table below).

Contents [hide]
1 Etymology
2 History
2.1 Meridional definition
2.2 Prototype metre bar
2.3 Standard wavelength of krypton-86 emission
2.4 Standard wavelength of helium-neon laser light
2.5 Realization of the metre
2.6 Timeline of definition
3 SI prefixed forms of metre
4 Equivalents in other units
5 See also
6 Notes
7 References
8 External links



[edit] Etymology
The word metre is from the Greek metron (µ?t???), "a measure" via the French mètre. Its first recorded usage in English meaning this unit of length is from 1797.


[edit] History
An official history of the evolution of the standard for the metre is found at BIPM.


[edit] Meridional definition
In the eighteenth century, there were two favoured approaches to the definition of the standard unit of length. One suggested defining the metre as the length of a pendulum with a half-period of one second. The other suggested defining the metre as one ten-millionth of the length of the Earth's meridian along a quadrant, that is the distance from the equator to the north pole. In 1791, the French Academy of Sciences selected the meridional definition.

In order to establish a universally accepted foundation for the definition of the metre, measurements of this meridian more accurate than those available at that time were imperative. The Bureau des Longitudes commissioned an expedition led by Delambre and Pierre Méchain, lasting from 1792 to 1799, which measured the length of the meridian between Dunkerque and Barcelona. This portion of the meridian, which also passes through Paris, was to serve as the basis for the length of the half meridian, connecting the North Pole with the Equator.

However, in 1793 France adopted a metre that was based on provisional results from the expedition as its official unit of length. Although it was later determined that the first prototype metre bar was short by a fifth of a millimetre due to miscalculation of the flattening of the Earth, this length became the standard. The circumference of the Earth through the poles is therefore approximately forty million metres.


[edit] Prototype metre bar

Historical International Prototype Metre bar, made of an alloy of platinum and iridium, which was the standard from 1889 to 1960.In the 1870s, a series of international conferences were held to devise new metric standards. The Metre Convention (Convention du Mètre) of 1875 mandated the establishment of a permanent International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM: Bureau International des Poids et Mesures) to be located in Sèvres, France. This new organisation would preserve the new prototype metre and kilogram standards when they were constructed, distribute national metric prototypes, and maintain comparisons between them and non-metric measurement standards. The organization created a new prototype bar in 1889 at the first General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM: Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures), establishing the International Prototype Metre as the distance between two lines on a standard bar composed of an alloy of ninety percent platinum and ten percent iridium, measured at 0 °C.


[edit] Standard wavelength of krypton-86 emission
In 1893, the standard metre was first measured with an interferometer by Albert A. Michelson, the inventor of the device and an advocate of using some particular wavelength of light as a standard of distance. By 1925, interferometry was in regular use at the BIPM. However, the International Prototype Metre remained the standard until 1960, when the eleventh CGPM defined the metre in the new SI system as equal to 1,650,763.73 wavelengths of the orange-red emission line in the electromagnetic spectrum of the krypton-86 atom in a vacuum. The original international prototype of the metre is still kept at the BIPM under the conditions specified in 1889.


[edit] Standard wavelength of helium-neon laser light
To further reduce uncertainty, the seventeenth CGPM in 1983 replaced the definition of the metre with its current definition, thus fixing the length of the metre in terms of time and the speed of light:

The metre is the length of the path traveled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second.[2]
Note that this definition had the effect of defining the speed of light in a vacuum as precisely 299,792,458 metres per second. Although the metre is now defined in terms of time-of-flight, actual laboratory realisations of the metre are still delineated by counting the required number of wavelengths of light along the distance. An intended byproduct of the 17th CGPM’s definition was that it enabled scientists to measure the wavelength of their lasers with one-fifth the uncertainty. To further facilitate reproducibility from lab to lab, the 17th CGPM also made the iodine-stabilised helium-neon laser “a recommended radiation” for realising the metre. For purposes of delineating the metre, the BIPM currently considers the HeNe laser wavelength to be as follows: ?HeNe = 632.99139822 nm with an estimated relative standard uncertainty (U) of 2.5 × 10–11.[3] This uncertainty is currently the limiting factor in laboratory realisations of the metre as it is several orders of magnitude poorer than that of the second (U = 5 × 10–16).[4] Consequently, a practical realisation of the metre is usually delineated (not defined) today in labs as 1,579,800.298728(39) wavelengths of helium-neon laser light in a vacuum.


[edit] Realization of the metre
The implementation of a standard metre is a complex topic, described in NIST Special Publication 330; Appendix 2, pp. 45-52. Among other topics discussed are: CIPM (Comité international des poids et mesures) approved radiations for practical realization of the meter and recommended values for radiations of spectral lamps and other sources.


[edit] Timeline of definition
1790 May 8 — The French National Assembly decides that the length of the new metre would be equal to the length of a pendulum with a half-period of one second.
1791 March 30 — The French National Assembly accepts the proposal by the French Academy of Sciences that the new definition for the metre be equal to one ten-millionth of the length of the Earth's meridian along a quadrant through Paris, that is the distance from the equator to the north pole.
1795 — Provisional metre bar constructed of brass.
1799 December 10 — The French National Assembly specifies the platinum metre bar, constructed on 23 June 1799 and deposited in the National Archives, as the final standard.
1889 September 28 — The first General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) defines the length as the distance between two lines on a standard bar of an alloy of platinum with ten percent iridium, measured at the melting point of ice.
1927 October 6 — The seventh CGPM adjusts the definition of the length to be the distance, at 0 °C, between the axes of the two central lines marked on the prototype bar of platinum-iridium, this bar being subject to one standard atmosphere of pressure and supported on two cylinders of at least one centimetre diameter, symmetrically placed in the same horizontal plane at a distance of 571 millimetres from each other.
1960 October 20 — The eleventh CGPM defines the length to be equal to 1,650,763.73 wavelengths in vacuum of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the 2p10 and 5d5 quantum levels of the krypton-86 atom.
1983 October 21 — The seventeenth CGPM defines the length as equal to the distance travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second.

[edit] SI prefixed forms of metre
Orders of
magnitude (length)
in E notation
1 E-24 m
1 E-23 m
1 E-22 m
1 E-21 m
1 E-20 m
1 E-19 m
1 E-18 m
1 E-17 m
1 E-16 m
1 E-15 m
1 E-14 m
1 E-13 m
1 E-12 m
1 E-11 m
1 E-10 m
1 E-9 m
1 E-8 m
1 E-7 m
1 E-6 m
1 E-5 m
1 E-4 m
1 E-3 m
1 E-2 m
1 E-1 m
1 E0 m
1 E+1 m
1 E+2 m
1 E+3 m
1 E+4 m
1 E+5 m
1 E+6 m
1 E+7 m
1 E+8 m
1 E+9 m
1 E+10 m
1 E+11 m
1 E+12 m
1 E+13 m
1 E+14 m
1 E+15 m
1 E+16 m
1 E+17 m
1 E+18 m
1 E+19 m
1 E+20 m
1 E+21 m
1 E+22 m
1 E+23 m
1 E+24 m
1 E+25 m
1 E+26 m

?/?



SI prefixes are often employed to denote decimal multiples and submultiples of the metre, as shown in the table below.


fool

SI multiples for metre (m) Submultiples Multiples
Value Symbol Name Value Symbol Name
10–1 m dm decimetre 101 m dam decametre
10–2 m cm centimetre 102 m hm hectometre
10–3 m mm millimetre 103 m km kilometre
10–6 m µm micrometre 106 m Mm megametre
10–9 m nm nanometre 109 m Gm gigametre
10–12 m pm picometre 1012 m Tm terametre
10–15 m fm femtometre 1015 m Pm petametre
10–18 m am attometre 1018 m Em exametre
10–21 m zm zeptometre 1021 m Zm zettametre
10–24 m ym yoctometre 1024 m Ym yottametre
Common prefixed units are in bold face.[5]





[edit] Equivalents in other units
Metric unit
expressed in non-SI unit Non-SI unit
expressed in metric unit
1 metre = 10-4 mil 1 Norwegian/Swedish mil = 104 metres
1 metre ˜ 39.37 inches 1 inch = 0.0254 metres
1 centimetre ˜ 0.3937 inch 1 inch = 2.54 centimetres
1 millimetre ˜ 0.03937 inch 1 inch = 25.4 millimetres
1 metre = 1×1010 Ångström 1 Ångström = 1×10-10 metre
1 nanometre = 10 Ångström 1 Ångström = 100 picometres
AnswerID: 290323

Follow Up By: Member - eerfree(QLD) - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 23:32

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 23:32
Yes I believe you --- but how long is a piece of string ? .

eerfree
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FollowupID: 555874

Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 01:02

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 01:02
39.37007874015748031496062992126"
0
FollowupID: 555880

Reply By: Member - Leave_enough_space - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 17:07

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 17:07
Take away the number you first thought of, and then add your mother in law's age.

But this only works in Whitworth!
AnswerID: 290422

Reply By: Steve from Top End Explorer Tours - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 17:11

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 17:11
It's not as long as Richards post or the discussion on thread 55075.

ROTFLMAO, Some times I just crack myself up.

Cheers Steve.
AnswerID: 290424

Reply By: Ozboc - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 06:56

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 06:56
I posted this question on the Jobs board at work --- came to work last night for night shift -- and the reply was

" double half its length"

Boc



AnswerID: 290520

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