load rating and sidewall puncture resistance

Submitted: Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 17:55
ThreadID: 55118 Views:2076 Replies:9 FollowUps:8
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I am looking for reliable 225/75 16 replacement tyres for an 08 model Triton.It will be used for touring(all conditions) and as a farm ute.I was thinking of a Mickey Thompson ATZ with a load rating of 115 or the Goodrich ATR which iam told is only available in 110 load rating or 8ply.
The vehicle is a single cab with a canvas canopy carrying the normal gear and spares for touring.
Is it much of an advantage for sidewall puncture resistance to go for a tyre with a heavier load rating?
Cheers
Tony
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Reply By: Member - 'Lucy' - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 21:41

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 21:41
Tony C


You posted this thread at 6.00pm EST and not one response. If I was you I would be thinking what a damn rude bunch of cootas.

Anyway, have a good day (whats left of it) and best of British Luck in your quest.


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Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Mar 04, 2008 at 16:17

Tuesday, Mar 04, 2008 at 16:17
Maybe the "rude bunch of cootas" had nothing to say, like you!
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Reply By: Member - Davidp P (VIC) - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 22:15

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 22:15
TONY, Go to the tyre dealer you trust most .....cheers silverback
AnswerID: 290485

Reply By: Andrew from Vivid Adventures - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 22:21

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 22:21
A heavier load rating does not equal better sidewall puncture resistance.
There is no measure of sidewall puncture resistance to my knowledge.
If you really want sidewall puncture resistance I suspect you ought to look at rags... eg. MRFs or the like, but you will have to change the wheels from the shiny alloys, if that is what you have.
AnswerID: 290487

Reply By: splits - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 22:27

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 22:27
Tony

As a general rule the higher the load rating the higher the pressure required to support the higher weight and the heavier the construction of the tyre to contain the pressure. How this relates to puncture resistance depends a lot on where you intend driving the car. Unfortunately the steel belted radial is the least puncture resistant of all the tyre designs, particularly in the side walls.

Try reading the information on this site. It covers the three different designs of tyres so you may find something to help you decide. http://www.beadell.com.au/tyre_construction.htm

You may find that if your concern about punctures is mainly confined to driving cross counrtry on a farm, then a second set of wheels with a heavy bias ply tyre just for farm use could be the answer.

As for the other tyres, you will find plenty of comments for and against every tyre on the market in the archives of this site so all you can do is start reading and take your pick.

Brian
AnswerID: 290491

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 22:49

Sunday, Mar 02, 2008 at 22:49
Load Index does not always correlate with sidewall puncture resistance.

You're better off choosing a tyre that has 3 plies in the sidewall, instead of the usual 2 plies.
Both BFG ATKO and Goodyear MTR fit the bill. The MTR's have the better reputation, so I'd go with MTRs.
Mickey Thompson are only 2 ply sidewall in 225/75.

A load index of 110 is fine.
AnswerID: 290495

Reply By: jeepthing - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 08:14

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 08:14
I think the only tyre that has true sidewall puncture resistance is the old crossply tyre that fitted on a split rim and I don't think there's too many of them around anymore?
AnswerID: 290525

Follow Up By: Willem - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 08:56

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 08:56
I've got 5 on my 4by and 3 on the trailer.

These days there are Indian and Chinese crossplies on the market but you have to search for them.
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Follow Up By: Member- Tony C - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 17:45

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 17:45
Jeepthing and Willem,
I didnt know you could still get them. The last set i had were Road Track Majors that came out on my old HJ47.They wore out after about 20000k and still had several punctures although they didnt destroy the tyre.I dont think i would go back to cross plys.
Cheers
Tony
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Follow Up By: Willem - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 18:13

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 18:13
Tony

Crossplies are for special purpose treks across unchartered country. I run MRF's on the GQ and Traingle on the Trailer.

Around town I run the normal road tyres 265/75/16 in Eldorados(made by Coopers). They are OK for run-of-the-mill driving and light offroad work

Having tried a host of tyre types for my treks I have had to go back to the old crossplies. Yep, they don't give much mileage but they are cheap and strong.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: jeepthing - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 21:09

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 21:09
In terms of sidewall damage the old crossply will out perform the latest radials everytime, I use to use them for pig hunting which involved a lot of cross country driving which involved some pretty rugged country. I never received any puncture through sidewalls and they copped a hammering at times plenty of nicks etc. Also never received any punctures through the tread.
I'm sure if they could make radials the same as the old crossply coopers puncture resistance propaganda might mean something!!
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Reply By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 14:45

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 14:45
Do yerself a favour & get Firestone Firehawk RMTs. Great tyre
at a great price..........oldbaz.
AnswerID: 290586

Follow Up By: Member- Tony C - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 17:38

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 17:38
Oldbaz,
I had a look at the Firestone RMTs.The local tyre dealer had them for sale for $190ea.They look like a good tyre with a heavy lug a bit in between a mud gripper and an all terrain.Checked posts on this forum and most people's experiances seem to be favourable.
Have you done many k's with them and what conditions have you used them.
Cheers.
Tony
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Follow Up By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Tuesday, Mar 04, 2008 at 14:34

Tuesday, Mar 04, 2008 at 14:34
Tony, I use them exclusively on a hilux sprayrig in 31by 10.5 on
15 by 8 rims, run at 50psi. I find they are durable, wear evenly &
not noisy on tar. I have used them for over 300k but cant tell what mileage I really get as 80% of the time they do 15kph off
road in the paddock. You would not need that pressure but I
do suggest you run them around 40 psi. My experience shows
running tyres on gravel/dirt/ paddock at lower pressures will cost
you money. The money you mention is about the going rate.
Good luck with your choice...oldbaz.
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Reply By: Member- Tony C - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 17:52

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 17:52
Thanks Phil,Brian and Andrew.You cant beet the experianced advice available on this site.
Cheers
Tony
AnswerID: 290615

Reply By: Eric Experience - Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 21:24

Monday, Mar 03, 2008 at 21:24
Tony.
The New Zealand made firehauks on my triton have had some rough treatment around the property and on the road. No punctures or problems in many years. Best k/$ tyre I have ever used. Eric.
AnswerID: 290671

Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Mar 04, 2008 at 16:20

Tuesday, Mar 04, 2008 at 16:20
Same here .... funny all the critiicsim that I got here when I posted about all the problems that I had with Coopers, I have had 2 sets of Firestone RMTs since, & have done all the same sort of work with them, & guess what .... NO PROBLEMS.
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