Driving Lights

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 17:32
ThreadID: 55334 Views:2280 Replies:2 FollowUps:8
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I am going nuts trying to find a wiring diagram to wire up a 5 post relay for some driving lights,If anyone could help it would be much appreciated.
Cheers Dave...
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Reply By: Member - Ed. C. (QLD) - Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 18:10

Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 18:10
How's this ??

Confucius say.....
"He who lie underneath automobile with tool in hand,
....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

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AnswerID: 291638

Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 18:31

Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 18:31
Thanks, That's exactly what I was looking for. Now I have a job wiring up my sons driving lights before it gets to dark.
Cheers Dave...
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FollowupID: 556972

Reply By: blown4by - Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 18:29

Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 18:29
Pin 30 is the power supply which you should run direct from the battery using 6mm cable via an in-line fuse of suitable rating to suit the current draw of the lights which will be 18 amps if the lamps are 100 watt on a 12 volt sytem so I would use about a 25 amp fuse.
Pin 31 is the earth which you should also run direct to the battery.
Pin 87 (& 87a if fitted) goes to the driving lamps. Make sure you run the earth leads from the lamps back to the battery also.
Pin 85 is the earth end of the switching relay.
Pin 86 is the positive end of the switching relay which you connect to the high beam circuit via a dash mounted switch so you can have high beam with and without the driving lamps.
If the lamps you are fitting are any good don't forget you will now need to dip your lamps much earlier especially on long straight sections of road not only for oncoming traffic but when following some one as well. As a general rule if you can see their tail lamps or headlamps yours should be dipped.
AnswerID: 291646

Follow Up By: Member - Matthew ,United Fuel- Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 18:52

Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 18:52
NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!

87 & 87a ,that is for a switching relay. It switches between 87 & 87a not supplies power to both at the same time.

You need a relay that has two outputs, 2 x pin number 87


MAtt
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FollowupID: 556978

Follow Up By: kcandco - Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 21:40

Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 21:40
Hi Matt

I am also just in the process of wiring lights. can you please explain the 87 87a principle in more detail. If power is not supplied to both at the same time how is it controlled to either 87 or 87a? I also thought the 2 outputs were for 2 lights powered at the same time.

thanks
Kc
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FollowupID: 557012

Follow Up By: blown4by - Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 22:30

Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 22:30
As Matt correctly states: You need a relay with two #87 pins = 1 for each lamp or if there is only 1 x 87 pin run both lamps off it. The 87a pin is on a change over relay such as you would use for switching current from one user to another.
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FollowupID: 557018

Follow Up By: Member - Matthew ,United Fuel- Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 23:20

Saturday, Mar 08, 2008 at 23:20
As explained by blown4by you need arelay with 2 87 pins, if it has 87 & 87a what happens is it switches the supply output from 87 when not energised i think to 87a when energised and does not supply 87.It is a changeover relay not a twin feed relay.

Matt
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FollowupID: 557033

Follow Up By: kcandco - Sunday, Mar 09, 2008 at 22:15

Sunday, Mar 09, 2008 at 22:15
Thanks Matt

That's an interesting concept..... I am scratching my head to think of a situation where that would be used. Can you put me out of my misery and suggest one.?? there must be some pretty clever uses for this feature.

thanks Kc
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FollowupID: 557201

Follow Up By: Member - Matthew ,United Fuel- Sunday, Mar 09, 2008 at 22:31

Sunday, Mar 09, 2008 at 22:31
Some headlight relays are like this,i think VL commodore high beam relays are possibly like this.

Switches from one relay to energise another with only one switching wire if you know what i mean.

Matt
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FollowupID: 557203

Follow Up By: kcandco - Sunday, Mar 09, 2008 at 22:39

Sunday, Mar 09, 2008 at 22:39
Yep ...that makes sense. Only one relay needed to supply low and high beam

thanks Kc
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FollowupID: 557205

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