what kinda of 4wd-car?

Submitted: Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 05:14
ThreadID: 56176 Views:2905 Replies:7 FollowUps:7
This Thread has been Archived
Hello,

I hope someone can help me out. I will come, in a year or so, to Australia and want to travel around in the outback. I don't want to pay to much for a car, let's say max. $6000. Has anyone got a tip for me what kind of car I have to choose. All other tips about 4Wdriving are welcome.

Greets Martijn (Netherlands)
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: PajeroTD - Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 05:54

Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 05:54
In that price range, check out Pajero TDi, Discovery TDi (not TD5), and check out Subary Liberty.
AnswerID: 296082

Reply By: Mr Pointyhead - Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 08:32

Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 08:32
Have a look at this site Car Sales to get an idea what they cost. If you want to travel in more remote areas, a diesel vehicle is the best option as the fuel is more available.

As for Brands, in remoter parts of Australia most people drive toyota landcrusiers or hiluxs. Hence parts and service are easier to come by. There are not many landrover dealers outside the capital cities.
AnswerID: 296089

Reply By: KSV. - Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 08:51

Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 08:51
It is greatly depends what you want to do with your car and how much you willing to spend on fix/mods and if you willing to do those fix/mods by yourself. Some questions to ask yourself. Do I need “real” 4WD or vehicle just capable to tackle dirt road will be OK? How big car I need (i.e. how many people and thus now much cargo to shift)? Do I need to be able to cover significant distances without refueling? Will I cover big distances overall, so economy is very important? Would I be able to fix it by myself or I will relay on service station to do it? You see – your question is way too broad and does not have direct answer.
Cheers
Serg
AnswerID: 296094

Reply By: Kiwi & "Mahindra" - Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 11:30

Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 11:30
Matjin,

Make sure, what ever car you get, is Diesel - fuel is more available for it but we have survived on unleaded and lpg, depending on how far out of town etc you want to travel make sure that you are self sufficient ie your own power ( dual battery set up), plenty of water and food. Good off road tyres are a must along with repair kit of some sort.

There will be plenty of 4wds that will suit you. Have fun planning!! This website is brilliant source of info for you, let us know how you are going with the planning!! Read through all the articles in the topics and places index, get those maps out, which Im sure your doing, and have some fun!

catch ya,

Laura

ps, just remember to watch out for kangawallafoxes and drop bears!!LOL!!
AnswerID: 296114

Follow Up By: martijn - Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 00:58

Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 00:58
laura

thanks for your replie!
what is kangawallafoxes and drop bears?
And is LOL have fun? same in dutch?

martijn
0
FollowupID: 562337

Follow Up By: Kiwi & "Mahindra" - Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 08:27

Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 08:27
LOL = Laugh Out Loud / Fun....etc

When you drink too much Bundaberg Rum there tends to be things that fall out of trees or off building and hit you out of nowhere! or you tend to walk into things! So these have now been officially named Kangawallafox and Drop Bears....its a bit of a joke and some fun but its a great laugh......

there was a tv ad a few yrs ago for Bundaberg (bundy) rum and it was about 3 guys camping near 3 girls. They guys warned the girls about drop bears (they had set their tent up under a tree)....then the bundy bear (he is the logo) fell out of the tree cos the girls thought the guys were having a joke!! Very good ad!

A kangawallafox = mix of kangaroos, wallabys and foxes...!!
0
FollowupID: 562359

Reply By: splits - Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 15:09

Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 15:09
Martijn

There is a lot more to this than simply saying you are coming and worrying about what car to buy as Serg has already pointed out. You may already know exactly what you want to do and where you want to go but we don't so advising you properly at this stage is just about impossible.

The Outback is a big place with every conceivable type of driving conditions. You could see a lot of it in a 2 wd family sedan, even a Cadillac would get you there on some roads, but the remainder will need a four wheel drive.

If you haven't already done so then I would suggest you start gathering as much information on the Outback as you can at this stage. You have plenty of time so don't rush into it. Start by getting a few maps. If you can't find them locally then buy them from here. Make sure you look at the map scales because the sheer size of this area is like nothing you will have ever seen in your country. It covers about 3 million square kilometres and contains less than 200,000 people.

Look up every town, tourist destination, area names, road or track names or anything else you can find on the maps on Google. Type in words like "Australian Outback" and see what comes up. Go through the trek notes on this site and ask us questions on any areas you are not sure of.

As you work through all of this information you will start to get a good idea of where you want to go, how long it should take and what type of car you are likely to need. You can then come back on here and we might be able to give you some much more accurate advice as to what to buy.

As a general guide at this stage, the two most common cars you will find in the Outback are the 6 cylinder petrol 2wd Holden in ether sedan, station wagon or utility form and the Toyota Landcruiser station wagon or utility. You will have a good chance of buying a mechanically sound Holden for $6000 but I don't like your chances of getting a good Landcruiser, or most of the other four wheel drives, for that price.

If you intend driving hundreds of kilometres through remote deserts, then you need the highest degree of vehicle reliability and an inexpensive used car could easily fall well short in that department. The recovery and repair of cars in some of those areas will cost more than you paid for the car.

You can get a good idea of what the various makes of cars sell for by looking up Australian car dealers on the net or "Car Sales" as Pointyhead suggested. All the popular makes like Toyota, Nissan, Mitsubishi and Ford are sold here. General Motors will most likely be under the name "Holden".

You can also check the major auction sites like Pickles and Fowlesmanheim. You can register free of charge and watch these auctions taking place live on the net. These can be good places to buy a car. I bought my current 4wd from Pickles. A dealer will be asking about $10,000 for a car that will sell for $6,000 at an auction.

That same $6000 car with some minor non performance affecting panel damage down the side would sell for under $2000 at an auction.

If you are serious about seeing remote areas, then you will not only have to pay attention to where you are going but when you go. You must choose popular places, tracks etc. in the cooler months of the year. By doing that you can be sure of having plenty of other people in the area should you get into trouble. If you go in the hotter months, the heat will nearly kill you and you will most likely be on your own.

The Outback has claimed many lives with one of the worst incidents being the English Page family of five in the early 1960s. They attempted to drive up the Birdsville Track in mid summer. It was not a difficult drive even back then but their car broke down, there was nobody else around and their bodies are still out there buried where they were found a short distance from the track.

The Outback is a vast, spectacular and beautiful area that can be seen and enjoyed safely with the right planing and car so do your home work, keep in touch with us and come on out and enjoy it.

Brian
AnswerID: 296145

Follow Up By: martijn - Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 22:00

Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 22:00
Thanks for all the tips. I really want to go to Cape York and do some other treks from de trek top 10 on this site. I don't think that I'm going to do them all by my self. I have no experience in 4wd. I'm will take a driving course. I want to go some places were tourist with 2wd can't come. Plus I think it has more comfort for a year driving Oz. On a backpackers site I can buy 4wd for $5000 or so with camping gear. But I don't now if they are ok cars. backpackers and cars!!!! I was thinking of a landcruiser diesel. I have time plenty to get more information.

Anyway, if you have any good tips they are welcome.
And thanks for your replies.

Greets Martijn
0
FollowupID: 562306

Follow Up By: KSV. - Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 09:45

Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 09:45
Diesel LandCruiser fill the bill indeed (I am driving one), but I do not believe that you can find one in good condition and reliable enough for your intends for 5K. You definitely need more then 10K for this.

Cheers.
Serg
0
FollowupID: 562371

Reply By: martijn - Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 21:59

Wednesday, Apr 02, 2008 at 21:59
Thanks for all the tips. I really want to go to Cape York and do some other treks from de trek top 10 on this site. I don't think that I'm going to do them all by my self. I have no experience in 4wd. I'm will take a driving course. I want to go some places were tourist with 2wd can't come. Plus I think it has more comfort for a year driving Oz. On a backpackers site I can buy 4wd for $5000 or so with camping gear. But I don't now if they are ok cars. backpackers and cars!!!! I was thinking of a landcruiser diesel. I have time plenty to get more information.

Anyway, if you have any good tips they are welcome.
And thanks for your replies.

Greets Martijn
AnswerID: 296249

Reply By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 08:06

Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 08:06
Hi Martijn

I would consider a 3lt Nissan GQ Patrol wagon- this car was built from about 1990-1995.

It is a very simple , but extremely capable 100kw 6 cyl carburetter based petrol engine that any mechanic can understand, with wide parts availability.
It has live axles and long travel coil springs all around and chassis is
of same extremely capable design as the engine.

It has relativily low weight 1900kg and has reasonable fuel consumption (Mine averaged 13lt/100km over the long haul).

You will be pleasantly surprized when you investigate this car and it will take you everywhere in reasonable comfort.

It is in your price range as well.








Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 296300

Follow Up By: martijn - Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 22:01

Thursday, Apr 03, 2008 at 22:01
sounds good!

thanks or your replie

but don't you think there are less parts for the Nissan patrol than the landcruiser. plus on diesel I'll drive more km.

0
FollowupID: 562564

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 08:06

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 08:06
Hi Martijn

On parts no , both early cruiser and patrols have good availability of parts.

The engine of that Nissan is the same basic engine as was used in one of this country most popular family cars.

There is no doubt that you drive about 30% further on diesel , but this is a question of balance , when you add in the extra price of diesel , maintenance costs , its other issues and that you will have to get an older or more expensive car than your budget the equation changes.

Simple things like running out of fuel also become more of an issue
unless your mechanically minded and know what your doing.

For some its a good solution , but for a less hassles stay I believe you will find that reccomendation to be appropriate.


Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 562622

Follow Up By: wigger - Saturday, Apr 05, 2008 at 23:33

Saturday, Apr 05, 2008 at 23:33
Hi Martijn ,
Have just seen this post and Robin's advice is sound. You might be taking a big risk buying any diesel for $5000 without having a very careful professional inspection of the the injection system and engine because if it's in a bad way it will cost you far more, maybe more than you paid for the vehicle, to get something like the injector pump replaced. Don't be tempted to focus on the fuel cost aspect alone.
The GQ petrol patrol might use a bit more fuel than a diesel but will be cheaper to buy and carburettors are cheaper to fix than injector pumps.
I have a diesel which is new, but would be very hesitant to buy a 15 year old one unless I knew the history of it and it doesn't sound like you want to spend a lot of time looking for the ideal vehicle.
0
FollowupID: 562956

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)