Carrying gas bottles

Submitted: Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 08:49
ThreadID: 56269 Views:5020 Replies:9 FollowUps:6
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Does anybody know if there is any requirement to carry gas bottles outside the car or can carry it in the back of my Patroll

Any help appreciated.
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Reply By: Member - Olcoolone (S.A) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 09:25

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 09:25
Illegal to carry inside an enclosed vehicle.

Very very dangerous, a few things....

If the tap assemble has a very small leak due to freezing, not turned of correctly or a faulty tap you will not detect it, this may cause an explosion that will more then likly take the roof of you vehicle off and throw it 100m away and the other thing is inhaling the gas.....LPG is heavier then air and if you inhale it wheather in small doeses over a long time or a large doese quickly you will DIE because the gas disperses oxygen in your lungs and being heavier will site in the bottom of your lungs causing asphyxiation......as little as 200 grams will kill you (around 2% of a 9 Kg bottle)

The last thing flying around the cabin in an accident.

Regards Richard
AnswerID: 296578

Reply By: Member No 1- Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 09:27

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 09:27
the requirement is for them to be upright......I think
i have to keep telling the guy at the servo.."Its it my car, paid for and stiff!"..

its got a protection device around the valve, has it not? so imo it should be safe laying on its side in the back behind cargo barrier and cant roll around...gee its only BBQ bottle and is not normally transported ...i know..its for the "what if" eh?
AnswerID: 296579

Reply By: The Landy - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 11:31

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 11:31
There are requirements and they are probably listed under the VicRoads website. Mind you, gas bottles in cars are accidents waiting to happen and shoud be avoided.....as evidenced by the following.

Gas bottles and cars
AnswerID: 296601

Follow Up By: Alan H - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 11:54

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 11:54
He was lucky to get away with that Landy. On the other hand I've got some pics of a Nissan and camper burnt out on the Kalumbaru Road and the bottles were still sitting there on the "A" Frame as black as, but didn't explode.
From that I'd conclude if they're closed tight there's very little danger from them.
The Queensland family in the Nissan apparently vacated it quick smart and who can blame them, but had one ruined holiday and a lot of extra expense I expect.
Alan.
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Follow Up By: The Landy - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 12:07

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 12:07
Apparently if they catch fire they say not to extinguish, but hose down until it runs out of gas. I used to carry one on top of the 'old' Landy, but prefer to use dual burner stove these days.....

I recall one actually catching fire one time up at Lawn Hill NP and a heap of people were running around with extinguishers trying to put it out........looked terribly dangerous and the bloke actually got burnt......nasty stuff.
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FollowupID: 562661

Reply By: Jim from Best Off Road - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 12:07

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 12:07
Don't know about the law.

But I do know this having done industrial testing with a "sniffer' machine. You'll smell the gas long before it is at a dangerous level.

A little common sense and treating a gas bottle as you would any other potentially dangerous item and you will be OK. IMHO a can of hair spray in a vehicle poses a far greater risk.

Jim.

AnswerID: 296607

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 12:21

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 12:21
Check for flys as well for whatever reason flys loooove the smell of the added scent. Ive detected leaks on outside gasbottles this way
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Follow Up By: The Landy - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 13:22

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 13:22
Some of the reports I have read indicate bottles have vented in enclosed vehicles whist there are no occupants in the vehicle to detect the leak/venting. On opening a door a static electricity discharge has provided the spark to ignite the gas. Agree that with common sense the risks might be acceptable......
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FollowupID: 562672

Reply By: Jim from Best Off Road - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 12:09

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 12:09
Don't know about the law.

But I do know this, having done industrial testing with a certified "sniffer' machine. You'll smell the gas long before it is at a dangerous level.

A little common sense and treating a gas bottle as you would any other potentially dangerous item and you will be OK. IMHO a can of hair spray in a vehicle poses a far greater risk.

Jim.

AnswerID: 296608

Reply By: Member - joc45 (WA) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 14:28

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 14:28
Does anyone have a url for the actual govt regulations on carrying gas bottles in vehicles?
My Googling seems to come up with little. (lots of mention on searching this forum, but no concrete regs quoted)
Gerry
AnswerID: 296631

Follow Up By: Member - morry H (WA) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 16:18

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 16:18
hi to my knowledge from my garage days, that is ilegal for the garage in those days to fill up bottles that people take out off there cars.mind you that you have to get used to the abuse that follows .also to my knowelege gas multiplys 200 times its mass when it goes off regrds morry
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Reply By: Nomadic Navara - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 16:12

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 16:12
A media release from Standards Australia Site Link contains the following

"Tips for transporting and using gas safely:
• Only transport 9kg or smaller cylinders in enclosed vehicles;
• Do not carry more than two cylinders in an enclosed vehicle;
• Cylinders must be securely held in an upright position, preferably in the boot;
• Barbecue gas bottles should be tested and stamped at least every 10 years;
• Check hoses for cracks or other damage regularly;
• Check gas cylinders and connections for leaks by covering the connection in soapy
water and looking for air bubbles. If there are bubbles turn off the cylinder and try re-
connecting. If it still bubbles, leaky parts will need to be replaced;
• LP gas is flammable, heavier than air and may remain in areas for some time."

I can only assume that this is a laymans guide that is a paraphrase of their regulations.

PeterD
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AnswerID: 296644

Follow Up By: Member - Longtooth (SA) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 21:50

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 21:50
This information was on the cage of a swap and go cage when I had my bottle refilled a couple of weeks ago.
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Reply By: DIO - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 17:52

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 17:52
B.L.E.V.E. (Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapour Explosion) what happens to a gas bottle if/when sufficient external heat causes the contents to rapidly expand and exceed the limits of the safety valve. This type of incident is feared by fire fighters, that's why you will often see them pouring large quantities of water onto it to minimise the effects of heat. Link also contains some useful/reassuring information on the subject of gas bottle safety.
AnswerID: 296660

Reply By: Member - Bill F (VIC) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 18:23

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 18:23
Hi Andrew

Carry your normal gas bottles for camping in the potrol (it would be safer in a TOYOTA)

There are millions of bottles on the road at any one time

Use normal precautions eg. upright, restrained, turn off tight if inside and not in use.

BillF
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