Tow balls

Submitted: Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 19:54
ThreadID: 56291 Views:3158 Replies:8 FollowUps:4
This Thread has been Archived
Not sure if recommended or not but I have drilled a hole into the thread of the towball just below where nut tightens up and after full tightness have inserted a split pin. Reason why, I have been called to some road accidents where a tow ball nut has partially come loose and stopped with rust or dirt build up usually towing horse floats , car trailers etc with constant braking/acceleration deacceleration over time the metal is fatigue and snaps the tow ball off. Even with safety chains a nasty accident does occur. I have used this method towing caravans all over oz with the nut locked into place.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Trevor R (QLD) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:03

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:03
Would it have been easier to use another nut and make it as a lock nut?

Regards, trevor.
AnswerID: 296682

Follow Up By: seawasp - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:09

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:09
good idea , provided the threaded shank has room for a second nut. Thanks
0
FollowupID: 562744

Follow Up By: Member - DAZA (QLD) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:11

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:11
You beat me to it Trevor.


Cheers
Daza
0
FollowupID: 562746

Reply By: kiwicol - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:23

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:23
some of the accidents i have heard of concern horse floats, where the timber floor has rotted out and the horse has gone through the floor while the vehicle is in motion, the driver has no idea what is happening, i leave the rest to the imagination. The nut on the ball should be applied with a spring washer so if it comes undone its due to operator error, ie not tightening properly, the split pin will not stop the ball snapping, only stop the nut comming off the thread. col
AnswerID: 296687

Reply By: Dion - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:26

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:26
There is no compromise to safety in drilling below the nut into the free thread. It is ok to drill through an axle to place a split pin through a castellated nut, then drilling as suggested by seawasp presents no problem.
Being a Weetbix fan, I have never experienced a loose towball nut though!!

Cheers,
Dion.
AnswerID: 296690

Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 23:51

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 23:51
Im with you Dion,
Ive never had one come loose, but it certainly wouldnt hurt.
0
FollowupID: 562812

Reply By: 96 GXL 80 series - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:44

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:44
Years ago Tow balls had this as standard.Hole and Split Pin
AnswerID: 296695

Reply By: John S (NSW) - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:47

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 20:47
loctite ??
AnswerID: 296696

Reply By: Mogul - Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 21:33

Friday, Apr 04, 2008 at 21:33
I use a nylock (sp) nut and spring washer, never had a problem in 20 years.
AnswerID: 296711

Reply By: Ray - Sunday, Apr 06, 2008 at 08:44

Sunday, Apr 06, 2008 at 08:44
I have heard that you should replace the tow ball every year if you are doing a lot of towing
AnswerID: 296929

Follow Up By: str- Monday, Apr 07, 2008 at 15:16

Monday, Apr 07, 2008 at 15:16
I have heard that too and read on a forum of a horse float going through the back doors on a down hill run after the ball split in 2!! Not to mention the horrid stories of snatch straps or chains being put over them with unpleasant endings.....
Incidently the guy I bought my new 4wd from told me I could do this...

If it is showing signs of wear I think you are to replace it.
For $10-15 for a decent quality ball its not worth arguing over IMHO
0
FollowupID: 563191

Reply By: Nomadic Navara - Sunday, Apr 06, 2008 at 11:22

Sunday, Apr 06, 2008 at 11:22
Seawasp

What proportion of these loose balls were there that did not have a lock washer? I think that may have been your major contributor.

PeterD
PeterD
Retired radio and electronics technician

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 296951

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)