Petrol/diesel mixed together

Submitted: Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 15:20
ThreadID: 56509 Views:9652 Replies:9 FollowUps:14
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I've heard that mixing 5% petrol ie 5 litres per 100 litres diesel, produces results similar to diesel/gas conversions. Is this true? Is it safe and legal and has anybody tried it? If so, how successful was it?

Keep the shiny side up
Ferris
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Reply By: Member -Signman - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 15:28

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 15:28
I'm not a brains trust here..
But is petrol miscible with diesel ??

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Follow Up By: ferris - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:05

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:05
I don't know, that's why i'm asking the question, although i have used a mix of petrol & diesel for starting burn offs quite successfully.
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Follow Up By: stefan P (Penrith NSW) - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:12

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:12
'I'm not a brains trust here..'

No shyte sherlock!!!! LOL

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Reply By: Notso - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:11

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:11
Years ago when diesel was thick and syrupy especially in winter they would add up to 10% in winter. This was actually in a Mercedes hand book around 1960 or so.

Don't know whether it has any other beneficial effect other than lowering the gell temperature of old style diesels.
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Reply By: ozwasp - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:29

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:29
Hi Ferris,

Diesel floats on petrol, so you'd get the petrol sitting at the bottom of your tank ready to be pumped straight in and blow your motor.... Try it if you like.

Petrol is used to ignite Diesel as Diesel's ignition temperature is much higher.

I'm not sure about Mercs using a petrol/diesel mix... Could just be a tale.

Will.
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Follow Up By: Cruiserman1961 (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 17:24

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 17:24
No Ozwasp, it's not a tale at all. I grew up in Germany and we used to mix up to 10% of petrol into the diesel to prevent the stuff turning into the consistency of margarine on very cold (-10 and colder) winter days. Was common practice over there until special winter diesel got introduced about 20 years ago.

Cheers, Udo
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Follow Up By: Notso - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 17:37

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 17:37
Yep, although maybe the handbook was a myth??
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Follow Up By: robak (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 17:41

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 17:41
Yep, my cars handbook states that you can add up to 15% of petrol to the diesel fuel during the winter months.
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Follow Up By: Notso - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 18:25

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 18:25
So what year and make is your diesel?
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Follow Up By: Malleerv - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:03

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:03
Won't blow up your motor. It just won't run. Petrol needs a spark to ignite so it just wont happen in a diesel unless there is some form of ignition. Even then it won't run good enough if the mixture is to high and any person with half a brain will shut the engine down before engine damage will occur.

Matt
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Follow Up By: Notso - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:22

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:22
Hmmm, Merc must have got it wrong then EH
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:50

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:50
Probaly not the best in a CRD as the fuel is also the lubricant and petrol certainly isnt
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Follow Up By: Notso - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 20:31

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 20:31
Nah, I'd never use it either but all we are pointing out is that in the 60s Merc and others recommended using it in winter.
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Follow Up By: Member - David P (VIC) - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 21:47

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 21:47
so thats how the ME109 became a 262.... :))...silverback
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Follow Up By: robak (QLD) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 08:43

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 08:43
Notso,

I've got a 1992 nissan 2.7 L turbo. So it's not that new.
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Follow Up By: robak (QLD) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 08:49

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 08:49
here we go....

http://www.exploroz.com/Forum/Topic/56448/unleaded_fuel_mixed_with_diesel.aspx?ky=&p=%2FForum%2FDefault.aspx%3Fpn%3D

"...But while an older style diesel engine may tolerate a small amount of petrol without too much damage, the newer Common Rail Diesels are unlikely to tolerate any level of petrol without damage..."
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Reply By: Member - Troll 81 (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:48

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 16:48
There was a thread on here couple of days ago about this and people do it
AnswerID: 297804

Reply By: Ben83 - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 18:33

Reply By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:02

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:02
Maybe alright for the older diesel engines, but NOT for the new age super dooper high pressure common rail electronic stuff, bad news so I have been led to believe.
stuff up seals and other sensitive components.
Shane
AnswerID: 297832

Reply By: Member - David.M.C - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:04

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:04
My dad was interstate truckie in the 50s 60s and 70s. He did it. It aint a myth.
AnswerID: 297835

Reply By: dj Patrol - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:18

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 19:18
Hey guys,
Come on now have a think about this well my donk would cost round $15 to $20 grand to replace so is this experiment worth that,

????? djpatrol
AnswerID: 297838

Follow Up By: Member - David P (VIC) - Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 21:48

Thursday, Apr 10, 2008 at 21:48
NOT ON YR LIFE!!
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Reply By: Member - Roscoe ET (QLD) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 19:11

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 19:11
There is obviously a lot of differing views on this question, until I purchased my current vehicle I'd never owned a diesel before, mine is a CRD.

I thought I'd do some the research so that I was more informed. Research I have undertaken indicates that it is fairly clear adding petrol, either mistakenly or deliberately, to diesel fuel of a common rail diesel engine is HIGH RISK.

From what I have read the "lack of lubricant in petrol" can very quickly kill the CRD's high pressure pump. CRD engines have a finer tolerance in the injector parts because of the higher pressure and it is critical that these parts are lubricated, diesel also acts as a lubricant.

Petrol will also cause damage to gaskets, "o" rings and seals. I also read that while kerosene may not cause as much damage as petrol it is still hazardous to the engine.

Diesel fuel is 15% heavier than petrol and packs a bigger punch that is why diesel engines produce more torque than petrol. Petrol has a higher octane rating making it harder to explode by heating.

From the research it seems that petrol in diesel could not explode at exactly the same time as diesel and could actually decrease the density of diesel, if enough was added, which would in turn reduce the punch of diesel. Although I think that 5% would not have any effect in terms of reducing the diesel's punch.

However, I am skeptical that there would be any increase in power and I'm certainly not going to try and find out.

It also seems clear that older diesel engines can tolerate petrol more than modern CRD engines, that would be why those people who have added petrol to diesel in older diesel engines have not suffered any damage.

It is fairly clear from what I have read that if you mistakenly put petrol in the diesel of a CRD engine there is a definite point of view that you shouldn't start the engine, you should push your vehicle out of the road and drain it out or call the dealer.

What people need to be aware of is that mixing petrol with diesel either by mistake or deliberately and as a consequence damage is caused to the engine it is NOT a warranty issue you're on your own.

Depending on your insurance policy you may have a claim IF petrol was mistakenly mixed BUT when it is done deliberatly it would be contentious if a legitimate claim exists.
AnswerID: 298021

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