Déjà vu, but from another angle

Submitted: Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 17:04
ThreadID: 56958 Views:2245 Replies:4 FollowUps:4
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The article: Petrol price to keep rising: Caltex

Another useless mumbling, but look at last paragraph that says:

“She said the federal government's plan to introduce a carbon cost to the economy by 2010, through an emission trading scheme, would also contribute to higher petrol prices if it was applied to transport fuels.”

This is what I always been talking about – all this carbon trade cr@p bring us nothing more then another fuel and electricity prices escalation and as result everything else as well. I just curious – where funds collected from this “trade” suppose to go to?

Serg
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Reply By: The Landy - Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 17:11

Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 17:11
The cost to industry to buy carbon credits will run into billions in Australia alone, someone is going to pay, and it usually means the consumer. This isn't limited to oil refineries, but anyone that has carbon emissions.

Let's all hope that we are in fact in a cycle of global warming caused by green-house gas emissions, because if we aren't our responses to it will be completely wrong.



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Reply By: Member - John (Vic) - Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 17:11

Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 17:11
Yes buts it all OK now we are in safe hands.
Rudd signed the Kyoto Agreement so it will be a better world.
See what a difference it's made to our lives already.
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Follow Up By: The Landy - Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 17:15

Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 17:15
John

The crazy thing is that China, who hasn't signed up to the Kyoto agreement, are actually selling carbon credits that they have generated for example from their 'wind generators'.

Some could argue that their wind generators are a positive start, but there is the irony, they weren't silly enough to 'sign-up' and burden themselves with compliance costs associated with Kyoto, but they are smart enough to generate carbon credits to sell to the rest of the world.
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Follow Up By: KSV. - Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 21:01

Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 21:01
John,

sorry, completely disagree - we now in very wrong hands

Landy,

yep, China position drives me bananas

Serg
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 22:27

Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 22:27
Thats OK Serg, straight through to the keeper I see :-)

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Reply By: mfewster - Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 18:28

Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 18:28
The really sad thing is that it is already too late. The genie is out of the bottle. We have passed the key tipping point. About three years ago the permafrost started to melt. The pollies and newspapers don't want to talk about this, it is too depressing. Melting permafrost is releasing co2, at an accelerating rate, much more than anything our puny little savings efforts are going to save. We should have all listened to the Greens 20 years ago and slapped on carbon trading tax in a big way then. The 2020 talkfest should have been considering what we are going to be doing between now and 2020 to shift population centres further north (where the water is going to be); and how are we going to deal with massive food price hikes (already starting to happen); what we will do about outback communities when transport costs make them unsustainable etc. Carbon tax isn't the con, the con is persuading us that they can still do something about it.
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Follow Up By: Member - DAZA (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 19:31

Thursday, Apr 24, 2008 at 19:31
Hi All

I was reading an article today, regarding the cost of Diesel & Petrol,
it said Diesel gives you 20to 30 percent better fuel economy, and the
other plus is it has lower greenhouse emissions, so why dont the
powers to be, encourage more people to have Diesel Vehicles, and
as an incentive, lower the cost of Diesel Fuel.?

PS they were using modern Diesel Engines, as an example.

Cheers

Daza
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Reply By: guzzi - Friday, Apr 25, 2008 at 12:41

Friday, Apr 25, 2008 at 12:41
Well,
They've finally found a way to TAX air and WATER.
Of course it only you poor unwashed scum that will have to contribute.
It wont effect the rich or the pollies.

Global warming, Weapons of mass destruction, Y2K are you seeing a theme here yet?
AnswerID: 300415

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