Ground/Sand recovery anchors

Submitted: Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:31
ThreadID: 57912 Views:14426 Replies:11 FollowUps:13
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I've seen steel recovery anchors in shops that sell for over $400, but only seem to be a few pieces of steel, a bit of welding and some bolts.
Now, this description may be a bit simplistic based on lack of knowledge, but I am willing to suffer the normal verbal barrage from members if they have their feelings hurt.
Strong looking boat anchors suitable for up to 30 foot boats are available for around $100 to $150, and would appear to be adaptable for vehicles if they rated accordingly in strength.
As many of the ExplorOz members are also boaties, does anyone know if using a strong boat anchor a feasible way of obtaining a cheaper alternative to ground anchors?
Are boat anchors designed or tested to any standards?
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Reply By: Ozboc - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:37

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:37
did you have any links to the land anchors ? i am in the engineering trades , and would not be much of a hassle for me to knock one up :)

Boc
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Follow Up By: brushmarx - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:18

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:18
Sorry, no links, but Ebay Item number: 300225894592
has what they look like.
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Reply By: Crackles - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:43

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:43
The critical part of a ground anchor from what I've been told is the angle the point digs into the soil. It's unlikely that this angle would be correct on a boat anchor as obviously it's designed for a totally different purpose. I'd suggest by the time you found one strong enough to support the strain of a 9000lb winch it would be fairly similar in price to a vehicle recovery anchor anyway.
Should be able to get an engineering workshop to custom build one cheaper than $400.
Cheers Craig..............
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Follow Up By: brushmarx - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:27

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:27
Hi Craig
I wouldn't have thought the design requirements would be all that different as the purpose is basically identical.
Boat anchors have a chain to keep the drag resistance angle close to sea bed level, as does the winch on a 4x4.
The more pull, the more the anchor tries to embed itself.
From personal experience in a 12" tinnie with very strong current and small anchor, it took a hell of a job with 3 adults to pull the anchor up when the outboard wouldn't start, and that was not a lot of effective weight just sitting on top of the water.
A welders workshop would probably be OK, but I was sort of hoping that boat anchors may have been "rated" to some design standard, but maybe 4x4 ground anchors aren't rated anyway.
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Ian
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Reply By: Avan - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:48

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:48
A cheap ground anchor is to get a plough disc usually about 12 or so inches in diameter. Fix a metre long chain thru the centre hole and connect to your tow cable. Dig a hole to bury the disc and start pulling out of the bog. (If it doesen't work and your bogged permantly at least you have the start for a vegie patch, at least you wont starve until help arrives). It is an old farmers device for vechile recovery.
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Reply By: Wayne (NSW) - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:55

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 11:55
brushmarx,

It all gets back to supply and demand. ( Much like oil prices)

If every 4WD had an anchor they would be as cheap as chips, but the sand anchor is very limited in the number of people who use them. Production cost will be high for low volume.

At $100 and hour for manufacturing it does not take much time to clock up $400.
I agree with you it is expensive and I bet all those blokes who left school and took up a trade (Tool Maker) as I did are reaping the benefits now.

Wayne
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Follow Up By: brushmarx - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:41

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:41
Hi Wayne
I agree with your analogy on supply and demand, but if someone was prepared to increase the demand by having a much cheaper price based on bulk manufacture, they would be like Virgin compared to Qantas. More bums on cheaper seats makes more money.
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Ian
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Reply By: snow - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:41

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:41
Spare wheel becomes ideal anchor...buried of course.
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Follow Up By: brushmarx - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:44

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:44
Not if you have girlie little alloys like a Monterey. You would only succeed in pulling the guts out of it.
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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:58

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:58
LOL I knew my steel rims would come in handy one day :)))

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Reply By: Member - Bretto&Laus(WA) - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:57

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 12:57
One of these would do the trick nicely
CQR or Coral Quick Release - relatively cheap and a very nice bite.
they come in all sizes.
Image Could Not Be Found

cheers
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Follow Up By: brushmarx - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 14:10

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 14:10
Looks like an option.
Now I have to head off to the local chandlery.
Thanks and cheers
Ian
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Follow Up By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 22:49

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 22:49
Just for the record and no other reason : as an older sea dog !!]

CQR stands for SECURE and not for Coral Quick Release.....

They are a sand/soft bottom anchor and in Queensland at least, using them on coral bottoms will earn the displeasure of the marine Plod ....... they will destroy the reef very effectively.
Hence the need for the proper coral [pronged] anchor.
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Reply By: troopyman - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 14:39

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 14:39
no no no no no no no . My sand anchor is stamped and rated at 12000lbs for a start . If you want to kill yourself or someone else from flying metal then go ahead .
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Follow Up By: brushmarx - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 15:56

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 15:56
That's what I wanted to see, so anchors are rated. I called a couple of boat accessory places, and the staff had no idea what a rating meant.
I have a Tirfor hand winch and no way in hell am I going to reach 12000 lbs on that, so it may only be a matter of getting a rated anchor that will do the job.
It would still depend on cost of anchor compared to a specially made ground anchor.
More investigation to go.
Thanks troopyman.
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Follow Up By: Ozboc - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 16:21

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 16:21
You say that it is rated , who has done the testing ???? Nobels ?? should be on the compliance tested tag ....


Boc


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Follow Up By: troopyman - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 18:00

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 18:00
Ok . So you want to use a winch that is rated at say 8000lbs and wire winch rope that is rated at 8000lbs and attach a rated shackle to a boat anchor . Think about it .

sand anchor
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Reply By: Member - Dave A Karratha(WA) - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 15:39

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 15:39
totally agree with you troopyman, I have one of the above anchors on a 8 metre aluminium boat ( the anchor weighs 15 kilos) and although it does a good job for a 2.7 tonne boat, with little resistance, I have bent the main arm of it when I got it stuck in 125 metres of water with a 800 kilo pull max. anchor winch on the boat.

Horses for courses, and these are not for 4x4's.

Spend the bucks and get the right one.
AnswerID: 305469

Follow Up By: Member - Bretto&Laus(WA) - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 16:43

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 16:43
Thats what i like about this place, genuine research by the majority.
I had no Idea that a sea anchor would be a bad idea for a recovery job on land.
thats what 15 years working on the Ocean does to ya :P

Apologies for the previous post

cheers
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Follow Up By: V8 Troopie - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 23:44

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 23:44
When you consider that there is a BIG difference between wet (underwater) soil and dry (land) soil then the idea of using a sea anchor on land does sound questionable.
But there are some boat anchors, especially those that work like a shovel rather than like a plow that may be useful.

What puzzles me is just how Dave's anchor got stuck in 125m of water. That is way too deep for anchoring a 8m boat, he'd need to carry about 750meters of anchor rode ??
Klaus
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Reply By: blue one - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 18:49

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 18:49
3 star pickets chained together in a line works for me.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: ian - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 19:15

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 19:15
how does it work?
Ian
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Reply By: Outnabout David (SA) - Friday, May 23, 2008 at 19:41

Friday, May 23, 2008 at 19:41
There are many different ways, bury a tyre or disc, star pickets etc. but what a pain in the arse. Have those that suggest these ideas ever tried to dig the hole and if so how long did it take? hile expensive mI can understand the cost.
If you want a PRT anchor which is the same as in Troppymanss link I have one to sell at a lotl less than $400.

I find I am not going too many places alone these days and am travelling a lot lighter so if interested then email me.
AnswerID: 305504

Reply By: Muzzgit [WA] - Sunday, May 25, 2008 at 01:18

Sunday, May 25, 2008 at 01:18
4X4 monthly magazine did a test on these a few years back. They tested 3 different models on a beach and all of them pulled out of the sand before the bogged hehicle moved.
AnswerID: 305696

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