4WD Driving Skills & Rules Feedback

I noticed a paragraph saying to descend a hill at a safe speed etc. In trucking you should descend a hill in the same gear you ascended the hill to avoid a mess up.

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Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Monday, May 26, 2008 at 12:22

Monday, May 26, 2008 at 12:22
What???
AnswerID: 305924

Reply By: desert - Monday, May 26, 2008 at 13:21

Monday, May 26, 2008 at 13:21
In off road driving, the down side can have absolutly no bearing on the up hill side, or vice versa, due to erosion, soil types, vegetation, slope side angle, slope percentage. Any gear chosen is a judgement call on the experience of the driver and no hard-fast book rules will help you.But having chosen a gear, it is advisable to remain in that gear, even if in hindsight you reckon you got it wrong, unless you are very skilled at clutch/brake upchanges on down slopes.
AnswerID: 305934

Reply By: Mike Harding - Monday, May 26, 2008 at 16:24

Monday, May 26, 2008 at 16:24
I don't know where you live but here in the Victorian High country we have some _seriously_ steep hills - sometimes it's the ascent, sometimes it's the descent, sometimes it's both - there are no "one size fits all rules" in regard to steep hills and they are one of the few areas where you can get into a seriously dangerous situation when 4WDing.

Really steep hills should be treated with extreme caution - my personal rule is that if I have _any_ doubt I use low range first and my motto is "I don't want to get there fast - I just want to get there" :)

Which reminds me; I should practice my reverse stall/start technique again, long time since I've done it.

Mike Harding
AnswerID: 305955

Follow Up By: Brian - Monday, May 26, 2008 at 18:55

Monday, May 26, 2008 at 18:55
Mike Harding replied:

"Really steep hills should be treated with extreme caution - my personal rule is that if I have _any_ doubt I use low range first and my motto is "I don't want to get there fast - I just want to get there" :)"

Sage advice Mike!!!

"Which reminds me; I should practice my reverse stall/start technique again, long time since I've done it."

And yes! Everyone should practice this technique!!

Cheers

Brian (Gold Coast)


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FollowupID: 572023

Follow Up By: Member - Warfer (VIC) - Tuesday, May 27, 2008 at 00:16

Tuesday, May 27, 2008 at 00:16
reverse stall/start technique again


Never heard of it could you kindly explain it to me !


Cheers
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FollowupID: 572083

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Tuesday, May 27, 2008 at 05:52

Tuesday, May 27, 2008 at 05:52
If you're going to drive in the High Country I strongly suggest you practice this technique before you do:

---------------
THE STALL START or KEY START

When a vehicle stops on a steep hill, don't panic. Think and stay calm.

1. Brakes on - both foot and handbrake.
2. Switch engine off if not already stalled.
3. Ease clutch in.
4. Select low range, reverse gear. Clutch out.
5. Check to see if track is clear to reverse and that the wheels are pointing straight ahead, not on an angle.
6. Handbrake off.
7. Footbrake off - but keep it ready for action.
8. Keeping your foot away from the clutch, start the engine and proceed backwards slowly down the hill. Don't touch the clutch or the accelerator.
9. Slight 'feathering' of the brake is possible, but take care.

NB: 1. With autos, if the engine has stopped, you'll need to start the vehicle in neutral, or park, before reverse gear is engaged (step 4).
2. If at all in doubt, chock your vehicle and use a winch to aid the descent or ascent!
---------------

Lifted from some website.

Mike Harding
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FollowupID: 572085

Follow Up By: Brian - Tuesday, May 27, 2008 at 11:38

Tuesday, May 27, 2008 at 11:38
Mike's step-by-step for the Hill Stall Recovery is on the money! Everyone who drives a 4by off road should practice this procedure. I have seen what happens when it's done incorrectly and believe me, it ain't real pretty!!
But get it right the first time and you'll be safe as houses!!

Practice it, and practice it often! (I practice every month at our clubs driver training day!!) You can even practice it on your driveway if there's a slight gradient.

Cheers

Brian
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FollowupID: 572115

Follow Up By: Member - Warfer (VIC) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 19:03

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 19:03
2. Switch engine off if not already stalled.


Thanks Mike for the quick response,Do you switch the engine off as a safety issue if not already stalled ???


Cheers


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FollowupID: 572344

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 19:58

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 19:58
The idea is that the vehicle has no motive power so you are starting from rest which requires a fair bit of energy - having the engine stopped reduces the risk of "run-away" when you engage drive.

The best thing is to try it for yourself in a controlled situation, I think you will understand it much more clearly then than anything I could explain :)

Mike Harding

PS. Enjoy the "Beef in red wine" - it's delicious :)
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FollowupID: 572359

Follow Up By: Member - Warfer (VIC) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 21:43

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 21:43
Hi Mike

Ive printed the Beef/Red Wine with your Driving Technique on the same printout (A4)...Notice the Meal is first just in case i stuff up the later ! lol


Cheers Bud
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FollowupID: 572380

Reply By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Monday, May 26, 2008 at 18:43

Monday, May 26, 2008 at 18:43
You should be able to descent a hill in a gear that allows the motor to control the speed, ONLY the motor (engine brakes/exhaust brakes if equipt), maybe a dab of the brakes, but ultimately the engine should be controlling the speed.
The brakes will love you for it, and most likely not warp when dropped into a water crossing.

Shane
AnswerID: 305975

Reply By: madfisher - Monday, May 26, 2008 at 22:41

Monday, May 26, 2008 at 22:41
With trucks you should be one gear lower decending than ascending.
I was taught that you should use a gear that requires the occasional dab of the brakes .
Cheers Pete
AnswerID: 306027

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