generators

Submitted: Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:01
ThreadID: 58113 Views:1974 Replies:7 FollowUps:12
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How fast can i charge a 100 amp deep cycle batterie with a yamaha 1000 inverter with a 8 amp charging point on it
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Reply By: Member - Olcoolone (S.A) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:15

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:15
I would say 12 plus hours......Maybe!

Make sure the output is for battery charging, we use Honda EU20i's for work and the 12 volt output cannot be used to charge batterys.

Might want to have a look at a good quality switch mode 20 amp battery charger.

We use Ctek's but I think Jaycar and a couple others do a similar one.

Even with a good 20 amp battery charger it still may take you 8 hours to charge a 100 amp battery from near flat.
AnswerID: 306410

Follow Up By: Member - Brenton W (SA) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:47

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:47
I have a charger similar to the ctek but it doesnt keep up with the power draw of the battery when both fridges are working, thanks for your advice.
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FollowupID: 572405

Reply By: Topcat (WA) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:22

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:22
If you want to get a reasonable life out of a deep cycle battery I would not recommend fast charging. They are not designed for it. Better to trickle charge at a low amp charge rate. Cheers
AnswerID: 306411

Follow Up By: Member - Brenton W (SA) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:44

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:44
Thanks for the help and info, so how do i keep enough power in the battery to keep 2 waeco 35 ltr fridges going?
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FollowupID: 572403

Follow Up By: Member - Phillip S (WA) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:44

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:44
I agree....deep cycle batteries are ruined by fast charging...I have a 3 stage chrger for mine...the slower the better
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FollowupID: 572404

Follow Up By: Member - Phillip S (WA) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:47

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:47
For how long and where ......out in the bush away from the main supply?
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FollowupID: 572406

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:49

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:49
I have been using a Delkor calcium battery for years as a "house battery" & it has been excellent.
I wouldn't bother with a true deep cycle battery again.
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FollowupID: 572407

Follow Up By: Member - Brenton W (SA) - Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:59

Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 23:59
last time we went camping the battery only lasted 1 i/2 days and was too flat it wasnt that hot and there was no sun for the solar panel to work, need to keep the beer cold
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FollowupID: 572408

Follow Up By: Member - Phillip S (WA) - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 00:41

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 00:41
You mean that it was cloudy.....you can get solar panels that work in cloudy conditions as well .......use a combination of solar and generator with a good charger to keep it topped up and I am surprised you only get 1 and 1/2 days...the last camping trip I did recently I ran a 50 and 60 waeco's off 1 battery...arrived at the camp wednesday, stayed two nights and left friday lunchtime because of a storm....still running ok...reckon I could've stayed one more night otherwise.
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FollowupID: 572411

Follow Up By: Mainey (wa) - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 00:43

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 00:43
Brenton,
you say the battery only lasted 1½ days running 2 x small Waeco fridges in conditions that were not hot.

I can only assume you drove to get to the camp site and the 100ah battery was possibly part of a Dual battery system, if so, it was being charged by the Alternator as you were driving.

If so, the 100ah battery is either stuffed or not being charged correctly !!

Mainey . . .
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FollowupID: 572412

Reply By: Grungle - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 07:46

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 07:46
Hi Brenton,

What brand and model battery is it? With this info you can find out the manufacturers recommended charge rate (ie C5, C10, C20 etc where charge rate = capacity divided by the number after it).

The 12V outlet on all generators is absolutely crap. You will only get something like 12.4V to 12.8V out of it which is not a good enough supply to charge a battery. Ideally a 3 stage charger sized to the capacity of your battery/bank is the best thing. What size Ctek do you have? If it is between 5A to 10A then I would say it is ideal for your 100AHr battery.

As other have said it is definately not recommended trying to charge the battery with too higher current too fast as it will ruin the battery over a short period of time. The best thing is to charge more regularly with a lower current to preserve life.

My 2c

Regards
David
AnswerID: 306425

Reply By: DIO - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 09:33

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 09:33
If you're after a 'high output' charger have a look at this beauty...

50 amp Digital Battery Charger

I.H.N.A.W.T.R. - just a staisfied customer
AnswerID: 306442

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 19:04

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 19:04
I do not know of any 12V lead acid battery (of the capacities required by people who post on this forum) which would accept a 50 amp charge without seriously exceeding the battery manufacturers specifications.

DIO? Are you another regular poster to this forum using a pseudonym?

Mike Harding
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FollowupID: 572510

Reply By: Member - John M (QLD) - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 17:11

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 17:11
Brendon
8 amps per hour on charge
100 amp battery
12.5 hrs constant charge

suggestion.... get yourself a generator for charging rather than an inverter. i have a 250 amp hour battery and a 2000watt generator it charges at 25amps an hour but i usually charge the battery off 240 at home the night before we go then when fully charged i can get 4 days before the genni gets used.



hope this helps enjoy the trip john
AnswerID: 306552

Follow Up By: Member - Brenton W (SA) - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 18:51

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 18:51
Thanks John, should have done some more research, but my partner loves the genset it runs her hair dryer well.
Many say that fast charging a deep cycle battery will shorten the life of it, what the h$%#l is the answer, seems the fridges draw down power faster than it can be replaced, i also have a down under 73 ltr fridge that has trouble with power as well, as soon as the battery drops in power the sensor cuts the compressor off

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FollowupID: 572505

Follow Up By: bob&loz - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 21:48

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 21:48
Brenton
If your charger has trouble keeping up why dont you plug the fridges direct to the 240 and than the charger is putting all its amps into the battery.
thats how we alway do it
Bob
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FollowupID: 572564

Reply By: webbo65 - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 22:46

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 22:46
I was wondering can you charge the vehicle battery in the vehicle connected and with the appliances running off it or do you have to isolate the battery first before charging.
AnswerID: 306646

Reply By: Muddy doe (SA) - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 23:19

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 23:19
We have a 115AH Trojan wet cell deep cycle under the hood of the Prado. It runs a 40 litre weaco fridge.

We have a Honda EU10 and a Ctek 15amp charger.

When camped more than a single day I put the generator on about 10am and run it till about 4pm with the Ctek hooked directly on the battery. Ctek usually kicks over to float after about 5-6 hours of charging and we are good to go until the next morning and repeat the cycle. Charge time can also be lessened a bit by running the fridge off the generator on 240v while it is running.

Battery is now 4 years old and has done quite a few cycles so I am making allowances for it. When new it would go 36-48 hours in average 20 degree weather. Now getting 24-30 hours before it gets down to about 12 volts and needs the Honda and Ctek combo.

Just our experience.

Muddy
AnswerID: 306657

Follow Up By: Muddy doe (SA) - Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 23:28

Thursday, May 29, 2008 at 23:28
I should add that if it is not too hot then we can get away with two days between charges but camped up on the river in march when it was 40+ degrees every day it was definately a case of 8-10 hours a day of charge to keep the power up!

Cheers
Muddy
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FollowupID: 572595

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