diesel classification

Submitted: Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:20
ThreadID: 58575 Views:7732 Replies:11 FollowUps:9
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is diesel classed as a dangerous goods?
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Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:21

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:21
Yep
AnswerID: 308868

Reply By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:28

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:28
Nope.

Now I've said it, I hope I get back up.
It is a pollutant, but is not volitile, some caution should be used obviuosly, however I don't think it makes the grade as far as becoming "dangerous"
Shane
AnswerID: 308870

Follow Up By: RosscoH - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 07:17

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 07:17
Agree with Shane, drove a fuel tanker carting diesel for three years and didn't need a D G license.
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Reply By: Motherhen - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:36

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:36
You've had a yes and a no Shane! It may vary between the states - most things do, but with no qualification to say this, I think it is classified as 'combustible' but not 'dangerous goods' so subtle differences in transporting it apply.

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Reply By: Matt(WA) - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:50

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:50
Shane,
Diesel is classed as a class 3 or 4 combustible liquid, dependant on its classification and flashpoint(temperature at which it will ignite, which for it to be a class three has to be greater than 70 deg c). It is not classed a a flammable liquid. But I believe it is listed as a dangerous good. Look up MSDS on google then search for diesel. It will give you everything you need. Hope this helps.
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Follow Up By: Wizard1 - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 09:15

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 09:15
I am amused at the amount of unqualified guesses to this question.

Class 3 is FLAMMABLE liquids , not combustible.

Diesel is classified as a combustible liquid, but is not a dangerous good when transported on its own. However, when diesel is transported in bulk with flammable liquids (Class 3) also in bulk, or with 1000 litres of packaged Class 3 goods, the diesel becomes a dangerous good under Class 3, Packing Group III and is then usually identified as a petroleum product, UN1270.

The thing to note is "travels with flammable class 3".
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Follow Up By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 17:38

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 17:38
Hi Matt,
I'm Just about to "split hairs" with you RE: flashpoints
The flashpoint of petrol is minus 40c.
diesel is around 60c.
The flashpoint is the temperature of which a substance begins to give off flammable VAPOURS.
Wikipedia is my friend
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Reply By: Member - shane (SA) - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:53

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:53
thanks for the replies, the reason for asking is if diesel is not classed as a dangerous good then i should be able to make my own long rang tank. any comments please.
AnswerID: 308889

Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:55

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:55
If you want to get technical....I think its classed as HAZARDOUS rather than Dangerous
AnswerID: 308893

Follow Up By: Vince NSW - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 11:06

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 11:06
Hairy
Have a look at Wizard1 s' comment above. It looks like it is straight out of the Australian Code for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Road & Rail, edition 7.
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Reply By: Member - shane (SA) - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:55

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:55
thanks for the replies, the reason for asking is if diesel is not classed as a dangerous good then i should be able to make my own long rang tank. any comments please.
AnswerID: 308894

Follow Up By: Member - Glenn G (QLD) - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:59

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 20:59
But then, what is your welding skill like ?

Cheers
Giffo
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Follow Up By: Member - shane (SA) - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 21:07

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 21:07
nothing wrong with mine, been welding for 30 years and have made fuel tanks before.
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Reply By: tukka - Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 22:14

Monday, Jun 09, 2008 at 22:14
Couldnt tell you the honest answer but a mate is a truck driver and had to do his Dangerous Goods course when he started carting Diesel. And they only cart Diesel no other petroleum. But it could just be company policy. I worked at a bloody bulk storage facility for 4 years and i still cant tell ya pretty pathetic. Though i know that it is classed as Combustible not flammable.

Actually i know what it is classed as, F@CKEN EXPENSIVE.
AnswerID: 308917

Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 13:11

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 13:11
Gday,
“According to CSIRO”
CLASSIFICATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS
Introduction
Dangerous goods are substances and articles that are potentially hazardous to people and property. They may be corrosive, flammable, explosive, oxidizing or reactive with water. Whatever their properties and their potential for injury and destruction, great care is needed in their handling, storage and transport.

Dangerous goods are divided into nine classes according based on their hazardous properties.

The Classification System
Australia has adopted a system of classification and labelling for dangerous goods based on the United Nations system used in other countries. This system helps people to quickly recognize dangerous goods, their properties and dangers.
1 explosives
2.1 flammable gas
2.2 2.2 non-flammable gas
2.2 oxidising gas
2.3 toxic gas
3 flammable liquid
4.1 flammable solid
4.2 spontaneously combustible
4.3 dangerous when wet
5.1 oxidising agent
5.2 organic peroxide
6.1 toxic
6.2 infectious
7 radioactive
8 corrosive
9 miscellaneous

So…..Does Diesel fall into one of these categories….I think so.

Cheers
AnswerID: 308991

Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 19:11

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 19:11
So which one does diesel come under??
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 20:23

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 20:23
Buggered if I know??

9 miscellaneous......Maybe.....LOL



Its not what he wants to know anyway.................
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Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 21:01

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 21:01
Wizard 1 is right, diesel comes under Combustible Liquids, class C1 liquids have a flash point of 150c or less. Example diesel,home heating oil. Class C2 liquids have a flash point of more than 150c example lubricating oil,peanut oil.Image Could Not Be Found
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Reply By: Vivid Adventures - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 18:02

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 at 18:02
I'm not sure that you are asking the right question.

Perhaps you should be asking is about ADR or State Government regulatory compliance:

Here's what the SA Department of Transport say:

Replacement Fuel Tanks
The fitting of replacement or additional fuel (petrol) tanks to vehicles manufactured prior July 1976 would not contravene the requirements of Road Traffic Act and Regulations providing that sufficient ground clearance is retained.
Refer to the clause below for details of ground clearance.
It is also a requirement of Transport SA that any petrol tank fitted to the vehicle is filled and vented externally.
For vehicles manufactured on or after 1st July 1976 the ADR requirements for Evaporative Emission Controls would have to be met. All fittings and devices fitted to the fuel tank by the vehicle manufacturer would have to be retained/duplicated and fully functional in the replacement fuel tank.
For vehicles manufactured on or after 1st July 1988, refer to specific requirements relating to ground clearance.

and in Queensland I believe there is a specific code of practice and a requirement for testing regardless of what it is carrying.

There is even some talk of ADR testing, although this may be for Heavy Vehicles compliance.

Cheers
Andrew.
AnswerID: 309052

Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Wednesday, Jun 11, 2008 at 11:34

Wednesday, Jun 11, 2008 at 11:34
Gday Shane,
In short.......you are allowed to make your own tank.
I emailed a bloke from...

Coordinator Vehicle Standards
Vehicle Services
Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure
Regency Park

If you want a copy, leave your email address....
Its fairly long winded and I probably shouldnt post it.

Cheers
AnswerID: 309192

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