OT - Buying/Building a Shed....what's your experience???

Submitted: Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 22:09
ThreadID: 58831 Views:5329 Replies:11 FollowUps:11
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Just bought a house (first) and need to put up a big shed. I'm looking at 7x15x3.1 or 8x12x3.1.

Now the internet is full of different manufacturers/resellers and the options are mind blowing.

I've spoken to a few mates that have had d sheds built and the construction techniques vary widely and I'm assuming this is why the prices do too (for the same size shed).

One mate had to bolt foot plates to the concrete and then "use 3 tech screws" to hold the uprights to them. That sounded bleep weak to me. I would be expecting the uprights to be all one piece with floor mounting plate already attached/bolted.

Anyone had any good or bad experiences with different types of sheds?? If you can remember the brand that would help immensly.

One great site I did stumble over is from www.shedsales.om.au and they have a virtual shed quoting system. Its great and allows you to get a quote on any size shed you want and you get a 3D diagram showing what your shed looks like as you build it...right down to the colour. Just a pity their prices "seem" a bit dear compared with some of the other websites.

Any feedback would be appreciated. This shed will cost more than any vehicle I have ever bought so it needs to be a good one.
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Reply By: mike w (WA) - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 22:36

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 22:36
hughsey,

Like all things it is you get what you paid for. For our shed I designed and constructed myself, as it was cheaper buying the materials direct from the likes of Midalia etc and suited my specifications better.

On another note, from my experience stay clear of stratco (if you have them in NSW) We had a patio designed and supplied by them it it was bleep poor from the quality of material suppiled, the amount of material supplied (numerous trips back to get that extra peice that they did not supply, such as 3m short on the guttering), weak (IMO and a roofy friends opinion) design characteristics, and not built to exact specification, which for us was critical , as the patio needed to extend beyond the edge of the house as per our suppllied drawings, instead they just extended the house on the design- go figure.

Stick with the reputable builders, and get as many different quotes as possible. I have also found (and have been told numerous times by roofy friend) that get quotes from franchise companies in different locations, as often yo can get a better deal from franchise x 35m down the road from your local.

Remember a shed is a mans castle, not forgetting to factor into the quote for the bar fridge and plasma screen

good luck
AnswerID: 310224

Follow Up By: Member - Hughesy (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:05

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:05
Thanks Mike. Yeah I'm beginning to realise that there must be a reason for the big difference in prices. And as you said "you get what you pay for".
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Reply By: fisho64 - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 01:41

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 01:41
just in the process of building a shed similar in size to yours, 12 X 7.6 X 3.1m.
But mine is besser block and steel roof.

Steel-if you go down the path of sorting your steel products individually, then GET QUOTES FOR EVERYTHING.
I made the mistake of buying quite a bit of reo bar from the nearest place and found out halfway thru that I was paying 40% more than Smorgons. It wasnt that one place was dearer, just that prices move like fuel prices.
The classic case in point was 180 universal beams, double the price from Smorgons and Statewide as Onesteel and purlin bolts $33 per 100 as opposed to $72 at another!
5 minutes on the phone or an email sent to all the sales departments can (and will) save you hundreds or thousands.

Good luck!
AnswerID: 310241

Reply By: Hairs (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 06:13

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 06:13
Hi Hughesy,
If I can give you just one piece of advice, it would that it will not be bigger enough. Go Bigger if money allows it.
Room only allowed me to go 6x10.5x2.4, wish I could of went 8x12x3.6.
You will always find something else you want to put in it or a mate will want to store something in it.
Thats if the Misses hasn't already claimed part of it. ;(

Yeah, their never bigger enough.
AnswerID: 310247

Follow Up By: Member - Hughesy (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:00

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:00
Thanks Hairs. I know what you mean about getting one as big as you can. I've been renting for years and had everything from a 2x3 garden shed to a 25m x 6m monster shed. And no the missus ain't claiming no room in my shed ;)))
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Reply By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 06:38

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 06:38
Hughesy,

I inspect sheds everyday for work, so yes you are correct in the different onstruction techniques. The ones I look at are cyclone rated so will be a little different to yours.

You will possibly require a shed designed to be able to withstand W41 winds?

To fix the wall columns to the cast in concrete mountings up here they use 4 x 16mm bolts so at least 2 x 12mm bolts should be OK for you.

If using 6" columns make sure it is the same gauge as the 4" column or you may be paying for less room internally for very little structural gain. This is due to the total cross sectional area of the steel column.

The shed supplier should be able to provide a complete erection schedule as well as a registered practicing engineer certification for the shed.

Remeber than wider and higher opening roller doors come in handy.

Enquiry about possible future additions to the shed eg front and side awnings.

If you need any more info let me know and I'll get some more info for you.

Cheers Sir Kev
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AnswerID: 310248

Follow Up By: Member - Hughesy (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:09

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:09
Hi Kev,

Your right about wider and higher. The standard 3x6m bays are far to small. And 2.4m h is a joke. The place I'm renting at now I have to let my tyres down and take the roof rack off to get thru the garage into the shed. PITA.
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Reply By: Member No 1- Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 07:53

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 07:53
i have found the c section garages to be good...very high clear span

get one at least 3 metres high and make it twice as large as you think you'll need...great for all the toys and workshop machinery while still allowing room for the beer fridge and heater.....i had extra purlins installed as the roofing sheets are as thin as paper This also helped in supporting the evap cooler
AnswerID: 310254

Follow Up By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 07:56

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 07:56
Insulate the walls and roof as well, it will help the beer fridge run ;)
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:21

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:21
Make sure you put upsizlation to stop the drips on those dewy mornings.

Leroy
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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:28

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:28
I agree Kev, i had installed "aircell" in ALL of my shed for around $1500 extra and it made a huge improvement in our tropical location. The best thing was that i could escape to the shed when it was raining and still think as the insulation isolated the HUGE noise from the rain on the roof and walls being transmitted through the steel frame. Test a shed with and without insulation and see/hear/feel the difference.

Must be done at building stage.....

Best $1500 i spent on the shed IMO.

Andrew
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Follow Up By: Member - Hughesy (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:11

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:11
Yeah I will be installing atleast roof insulation and also adding a evap cooler (Hot and dry out here). I had a shed in Roxby with no insulation or cooler and you couldn't use it for 4 months of the year!!
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Reply By: traveller2 - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:29

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:29
On a not unrelated question.
What would be the minimum eave height if intending to install a hoist to lift say a cruiser.
I'm looking at 18m x 8 x 3m at the moment. Is this high enough ?
In the Hunter region the most helpful have been Ranbuild at Heatherbrae.
AnswerID: 310264

Reply By: Saharaman (aka Geepeem) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:32

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:32
Hi Hughesy,

Research it very carefully. I found the best outcome was to use a local small shed company that could custom build one to my specification.
For example most companies use a thinner cladding on the walls than on the roof (0.42 bmt monoclad – ie. 0.47mm TCT). I changed that so that my walls were also 0.42 bmt. Just after being built we got hit by a severe hail storm – my shed was one of a very few in area that had no dents in the walls.
One well known company (that advertises a lot) uses Chinese steel rather than Australian steel so of course its cheaper but quality???
Go bigger if you can afford to – I decided on 11m x 15m by 4.2m high (3.0m on eaves). The height allowed me to build a mezzanine floor in the far end of shed for extra storage and still have room underneath for trailer, tool, mowers etc etc. This means I am getting about 35 sq meters of extra storage area for nix (I did it myself with second hand hard wood timber).
As others have said you get what you pay for – the shed market is very competitive so shop around but be sure you are comparing apples with apples. All sheds are NOT equal. Check the knee and apex construction joints – should use at least a 3mm thick pressed plate. What size are purlin bolts and how many are used etc. How are uprights anchored to slab (dyna bolts, U bolts or chemical anchors etc).
Good luck, Hope all goes well.
Cheers,
Glen
AnswerID: 310267

Follow Up By: Member - Hughesy (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:23

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:23
Yeah your right Glen. The cheapest extension you can do to a shed is have plenty of height to start with and just add a mezzanine floor.
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Reply By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Kath - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:54

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 08:54
Hughesy, I have built sheds and had them built. One piece to think of - you never build them big enough!

I have built kit sheds and think they aren't heavy enough or fixed into the concrete well enough. There are all sorts of grades/weights of C section and Z secton used in wall uprights, spans and purlins and you can't take anything for granted. You really need to inspect what builders are going to erect for you.
Cheers,
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John

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AnswerID: 310273

Follow Up By: Member - Hughesy (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:28

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:28
Hi John. Yeah I'm going to check out some more when I move in and can make a trip to Dubbo and see the local manufacturers.
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Reply By: Mr Pointyhead - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 09:28

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 09:28
Make it high enough so something like a Troop carrier with Roof rack fitted will fit through the door (Note ... fit under the door when open, not just the door opening. ). Standard sheds are way to low.
AnswerID: 310282

Follow Up By: Member - Hughesy (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:31

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:31
No wrong there mate. I reckon plenty of people get caught buying a 6x9x2.4 shed and think they got a bargain ......until they can't get their Cruiser into it.
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Reply By: Member - evren1 (WA) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 10:24

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 10:24
I have never heard a bloke complain that his shed was too big!
Make sure you go as big as you can!

I'm in WA so youl'll have different manufacturers/builders, but use a small company to custom build what you want.

What ever you do, build the shed first, uprights in cement footings, then pour the slab inside.
Despite the cost of living, have you noticed how popular it remains!

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Reply By: mattie - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 19:44

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 19:44
Hi Hughesy
If you would like to call(0417723010) i can offer a fair amount of advice as there are a lot of things that affect the price from the advertised price in relation to terrain category, importance level, wind rating, z purlins or tophats etc.etc and you have just missed out by a few days if you have not purchased a shed already as there has just been another price rise with some companies.

Mattie
AnswerID: 310381

Follow Up By: Member - Hughesy (NSW) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:35

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 21:35
Thanks Mattie. I might just do that on the weekend mate. I'll get some more info myself first so I'll have an idea of what your talking about ;))
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