Changing from 275 to 285 tyres in a Landcruiser 100

Submitted: Saturday, Dec 08, 2001 at 01:00
ThreadID: 592 Views:5207 Replies:4 FollowUps:3
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Can any one tell me about the pros and cons of changing the standard 275/70 tyres of the 100 series to a larger 285/75? Fuel consumption? Drive train?
Thanks Eli
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Reply By: P.G. (Tas) - Sunday, Dec 09, 2001 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 09, 2001 at 01:00
Eli, in general, 285/75 tyres will (a) raise your gearing (lower numericaly, which means at any given speed the revs will be lower than what they are now at that speed). (b) It will be slightly harder for your engine to turn them (because of the size increase, gearing etc, it will require more torque to turn them (with the power of the 100 series you probably won't even notice it). (c) you will gain roughly 21 mm more ground clearance. (d) With so many different tread patterns and rubber compounds available it is hard to be definitive about drive train wear. The more grip, the more chance to wind up the drive train. As for fuel consumption, there may be a change in theory (it should give you a fraction better because of lowering the revs at cruising speed) but I doubt you will notice much either way . I hope this helps. Cheers
AnswerID: 1560

Follow Up By: Eli - Tuesday, Dec 11, 2001 at 01:00

Tuesday, Dec 11, 2001 at 01:00
P.G. - Many thanks for your reply. Can you or anybody else recommend any specific make and model assuming I will use the tyres as a second set, dedicated to off road trips?
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Follow Up By: P.G. (tas) - Tuesday, Dec 11, 2001 at 01:00

Tuesday, Dec 11, 2001 at 01:00
Eli, now you have asked the $64 question. The answer lies in YOUR definition of "off-road". If you mean dirt roads and tracks in the outback then high narrow tyres with strong sidewalls (7.50X16LT) or similar seem to be the way to go. If you are going more for mud, slush or snow then wider tyres are better (eg your 275 or 285's would be better). There are strong arguments about brand but BFG's or Cooper Tyres seem to be the current flavour of the month. Having said that, I have had a good run out of Goodyear's Wrangler AT/S's, not the standard AT. For an all rounder then I would consider a LT235/85X16 (LT standing for light truck) on 6 to 7 inch steel (prefereably split) rims. Whatever size and type you choose make sure the minimum speed rating is N (max 140km/h), and remember, the wider the tyre, the more rubber on the road, the more chance of picking up a puncture. I hope I haven't confused you to much. Cheers
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Reply By: porl - Monday, Dec 10, 2001 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 10, 2001 at 01:00
Also, i am lead to believe, which is a direct consequence of the gearing change already alluded to above, the vehicle may exhibit a tendency to run downhill at a greater accelerated rate when you are relying on your gearing to slow you down than as with the standard tyres. This led to one bulletin board visitor at another site, who obviously goes down a lot of very steep hills, to take his tyres back for a refund and put on A/T's of the original size.

Though he did admit that the revs were noticably lower on the highway (and the speedo was out about 5km/hr at highway speeds) which would mean i would have thought that unless you intend to rely on downhill engine breaking to any significant extent, the pluses of better fuel economy on highway runs and extra diff clearance (which you don't get from a body lift) would mean higher tyres is probably in the balance a good thing.
AnswerID: 1565

Follow Up By: Eli - Tuesday, Dec 11, 2001 at 01:00

Tuesday, Dec 11, 2001 at 01:00
PORL- Many thanks for your reply. Can you recommend any specific make and model assuming I will use the tyres as a second set, dedicated to off road trips?
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FollowupID: 500

Reply By: porl - Thursday, Dec 13, 2001 at 01:00

Thursday, Dec 13, 2001 at 01:00
As P.G. said correctly, totally depends on where you are going. As an all round which is better than a road tyre at anything off road but not as good as a specific terrain tyre in the specific terrain (eg mud tyre in mud or balloon tyre in soft sand or tractor monstor tyre in just about anything) go for in my opinion the tried and tested, if you can afford it, BFG A/T or the Cooper equivalent or the new whatchamacallit Bridgestone tyre with the donut technology that is supposedly more puncture proof than the BFG or the Cooper. Or as one 4WD magazine the best tyre is the one with the best driver, or as another one said, the best tyre is the one that is black, round, inflated, and you can afford, but given prosaics are not much help the above should. Also, a friend just got back from a desert trip and his mate in a Pajero shreded two Yokohama Superdiggers, maybe it was his driving or maybe he had wrong pressures or maybe don't buy those tyres for that trip, but my mate with his Bridgestones didn't even get a puncture.
AnswerID: 1583

Reply By: John - Thursday, Dec 13, 2001 at 01:00

Thursday, Dec 13, 2001 at 01:00
Eli :

get a set of split rims and put a set of JapDunlop 7.50 x 16ins. x 8 ply's on and enjoy a trouble free and punctureless trip in the Outback, stuff all those American gizzmos ( Coopers) too full of BULLDUST !! and keep to a narrow tyre which is all you need-- believe me I have been there and done that with them-- you wont get better
John
AnswerID: 1588

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