Shell Motorist's index

Submitted: Sunday, Jan 04, 2009 at 17:35
ThreadID: 64809 Views:2105 Replies:2 FollowUps:2
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G'day all. I found this book again in my book shleves and thought it may interest some people. I think it may be 1929 edition. It mentions air time records of 1927,28 and 29. In one of the pictures you can see at the bottom of the page K-W-7/29, I think may be july, 29.
One section is about what oil should be used in what car. Cars Napier, Overland Whippet, Packard, Jowett, Lagonda etc.
I am going to scan the book and then let you all know and if anyone would loke a copy they can then email me.
Hope some of you find it interesting.Image Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found
Love the bush

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Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Sunday, Jan 04, 2009 at 18:25

Sunday, Jan 04, 2009 at 18:25
Ah yes, the good old days, when companies thought it was a good idea to provide services to customers, rather than diverting as much money as possible to the CEO.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Monday, Jan 05, 2009 at 09:41

Monday, Jan 05, 2009 at 09:41
Gee I wish!

A very advanced, for its time, form of advertising. Got all their products in front of prospective clients - educated them to as to service intervals for oil changes, bearing repacks etc....... and then told them the products to purchase.

Wrapped it all up in an informative package that had the user regularly referring to the publication - known as reinforcement.

Worked for the Shell Company in a previous life and their marketing people were second to none.

Those members of a "certain" age may remember the "Pears Encyclopaedia", there were probably few homes in this country without one. The Pears was dragged out to settle arguments on almost any subject, it's atlas section showed half the world shaded in pink to denote the British Empire. Same principle as the Shell publication.

Interestingly enough some spark decided that Pears did not need to spend the huge sum that they did in heavily subsidising the encyclopaedia and stopped publishing. In a few short years their sales dropped to virtually nothing and are today almost unknown.

Ian
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Reply By: Dave B (NSW) - Monday, Jan 05, 2009 at 17:48

Monday, Jan 05, 2009 at 17:48
Yeah, I have a copy of the Pears Cyclopedia here, 1914 edition.

Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 16:15

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 16:15
Brilliant!

Look after it Dave, I doubt that it will be worth a packet because there were millions distributed in Australia, not to mention the rest of the world. Having said that, there will be a collector somewhere who will lust after it.

As a kid we had a pristine example complete with loose outer cover, printed immediately prior WW2, 1938 from memory. Have no idea what ever happened to it.

Ian
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