Goodyear Wrangler At'R

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:19
ThreadID: 64867 Views:2638 Replies:6 FollowUps:8
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Hi guys ,got a set of these on my roadastar van and at 40 PSI its looking baggy on the sidewalls. the Dealer recomended 40PSI...
What pressures will the tyre take please with the weight of the van at 2 ton neat...

whats the MAX i can pump them up to and still not overheat them on highway towing

TIA.. Cheers.. Rod
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Reply By: Member - desray (WA) - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:27

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:27
The max pressure is usually marked on the side wall.
AnswerID: 342949

Follow Up By: rredbeak - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:30

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:30
TY desray,i didnt know that. Ill check it out cheers.. Rod
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Reply By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:31

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:31
Rod,

The more pressure you put into a tyre, the less it heats up.

Cheers,

Jim.

AnswerID: 342950

Follow Up By: rredbeak - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:33

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 21:33
Ty Jim,
ive had ppl call me on the UHf telling me my tyres are half flat... Ill checkout the sidewalls in the morning..

Rod
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Follow Up By: Skippy In The GU - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 22:11

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2009 at 22:11
And when driving along the tyre build up more pressure maybe upto 4psi above from cold
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 11:53

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 11:53
A good way to tell is take pressure before leaving,then after driving for long enuf for tyres to heat up, take tyre temps. For tyre pressure to be correct they should be 4lb higher.
If they are higher they are too soft, if less they are too hard.

cheers.
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Reply By: Member -Dodger - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 11:38

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 11:38
Rod
You did not state your tyre size which makes a big difference.
Yes the max weight and pressure is usually shown on the sidewall .
EG. My 265/75/16 Wrangler ATs have 1250kg@ 44psi shown on the sidewall.
Wranglers do bag out more than some other brands which is normal.
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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AnswerID: 343030

Reply By: Wizard1 - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 12:45

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 12:45
The problem is that Wrangler ATR are not light truck and shouldn't be used for a caravan. Which is why you are getting so much side wall flex. Who recommended them for a van?

Secondly you will find the max pressure stamped on the tyre also giving the max payload for that pressure.

I run 4WD Light Truck HT on my van at 50 PSI. The more air the less heat is generated in the tyre from side wall flex, etc. Only dropped them to 40 PSI when I travelled the Birdsville Track becaue of the gibbers with no damage.

I have had Wrangler ATR on my Prado since late 2005 and rate them as a 4WD tyre. 100% on the Cooper AT crap I had before.
AnswerID: 343041

Follow Up By: rredbeak - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 21:10

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 21:10
wizard they come as standard fittment on the new Roadstar series van , My van is also new...

Rod
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Reply By: Member - Roscoe ET (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 15:08

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 15:08
rredbeak,

From what you're saying about baggy sidewalls at 40 psi I take it your Roadstar a single axle van?

If so at 2 tonne the tyres should be Light Truck with a cold PSI of 50.

Running ordinary tyres on a single axle van at cold psi of 40 will cause a lot of flexing and heat buildup and you will also notice that the van will move around a bit under tow due to the flexibility of the tyre. You will also run the risk of a blow out with excessive heat build up.

If your van is dual axle @ 2 tonne and they are not light truck tyres you will probably get away with ordinary tyres as the load is generally spread evenly over the 4 tyres assuming your axles are on simplicity suspension or the rocker type. Each tyre would generally be carrying a load of 500kg.

However even under these circumstances I would be using LT tyresas they are more robust.

The best test is the 4lb rule, if the tyres are gaining more than 4lb @ their max cold pressure marked of the tyre's sidewall then they a would not be the correct tyre for their application as they would be gaining too much heat.
AnswerID: 343062

Follow Up By: rredbeak - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 21:12

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2009 at 21:12
Roscoe its a single axel van and NO theres no "moving around" of the van under tow. You literally forget the thing is there...

Rod
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FollowupID: 610908

Follow Up By: Member - Roscoe ET (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 08, 2009 at 09:30

Thursday, Jan 08, 2009 at 09:30
rredbeak,

That's interesting normally if you have too much flexing/bulge the physics of it all would introduce some movement particularly with a 2 tonne single axle van on undulating road, or when you make a sudden turn with your vehicle to avoid something.

If you're not experiencing that on occasions then I would expect the load rating on the Wranglers is in excess of 1 tonne, that is above a load index of 108.

If that's the case then I believe that would explain why you're not experiencing some movement in the circumstances.

If you're using weight distribution bars and/or an anti sway bar they would certainly correct any movement that would otherwise be there due to too much tyre flexing.

But bear in mind that a tyre that is flexing too much will cause a build up of excessive heat, regardless of whether the van is moving around under certain circumstances.

Anyway, enjoy your van and your travels.

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FollowupID: 610975

Reply By: Ron173 - Thursday, Jan 08, 2009 at 15:58

Thursday, Jan 08, 2009 at 15:58
Apart from the sidewall,

there is another way to do it, and this way gives you the exact air pressure for any tyre under any given load.

Now heres the catch.... I cant remember it...lol

but its called the Pirelli principle, and is based on a hot n cold pressure.

you inflate cold to x psi, then drive so far n check it, and its not meant to go up more than a certain amount or you need more air, and if not gone up enough you need to let some out.

I'm sure with a bit of googling you would find it.

Its quite simple formula, but also quite spot on, lets you find your own unique settings for your rig.

Ron
AnswerID: 343231

Follow Up By: Ron173 - Thursday, Jan 08, 2009 at 16:12

Thursday, Jan 08, 2009 at 16:12
Just re read thread n noticed Graham H follow up above stating 4psi more, thats what was called the pirelli principle.

So as Graham correctly says, should be 4psi more than cold pressure. If more they are too soft, if less than 4psi increase they too hard.

Ron
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FollowupID: 611045

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