Diff Wind Up

Submitted: Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 19:38
ThreadID: 6511 Views:3280 Replies:7 FollowUps:15
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We recently purchased our first 4x4 and have been told that it should be run 20km per month in 4wd (owners manual) Not being able to get in the dirt as often as we would like what is the answer to over come this problem without causing diff wind up.
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Reply By: Member - Kim (mr) - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 19:44

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 19:44
If you cant get into the dirt for 20 km a month why would you by a 4wd?More drive'n less talk'n
AnswerID: 27485

Follow Up By: Member - Kim (mr) - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 19:57

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 19:57
if you can not get into the dirt at all and it has manual locking hubs you can at leasty lock these in without putting it into 4wd and drive on the black stuff without doing any harm to your 4wd. This will oil up your front hubs. The only thing this will cause is a very slight increase in fuel.More drive'n less talk'n
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FollowupID: 18917

Follow Up By: Mick - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:50

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:50
Come on Mr Kim - surely you can work out that some people buy a 4wd for reasons other than going off road! Try towing a boat/caravan/horse float/heavy trailer or maybe the elevated position to name just a few!!
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FollowupID: 18934

Follow Up By: Jason (macca) - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 06:55

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 06:55
Kim,

I buy a brand new 4wd every 2 years and have only been off road
twice for memory.

I utilise my fourbie for towing my boat.

Cheers
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FollowupID: 18952

Follow Up By: Walrus - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 20:48

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 20:48
To answer some of the questions the vehicle is a 2003 Hilux SR5 Dual Cab V6 petrol automatic. The vehicle is fitted with a button on the transfer lever which is depressed to engage 4wd and the lever is constantly in H4 and can be depressed up to 100km per hr. Toyota call it ADD or something. Didnt know it was a crime to buy a 4wd then not get it in the dirt for a little while, but to satisfy this question I tow a reasonable sized boat (5mt Seafarer Vamp Approx weight 1000 plus kg) and also have just purchased an off road camper to take on an extended tour of the country in 7 months after I finish the renovations on my house which I will then sell and move to Northern NSW to my other property where I will be in the sand up to Fraser to surf, fish etc. Hope that answers the question. If its not diff wind whatever it was called I know that it can damage the vehicle thats why Im asking. I am looking at taking a 4wd course so until I can get there I thought I would ask. Thank you to those people who have posted a response. Happy Days Walrus
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Reply By: Voxson (Adelaide) - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 19:56

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 19:56
what is it?_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________
AnswerID: 27488

Reply By: Member - Willem- Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:01

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:01
What make and year model is your 4x4? Is it constant 4x4 or part time 4x4?
If you are worried about diff wind up just jack two rear or front wheels off the ground and run the drive trail for twenty minutes to half and hour per month. Frankly I know of gearbox wind up but not of diff wind up. But then again I've only had older vehicles.

Cheers, Willem
Never a dull moment
AnswerID: 27489

Follow Up By: Member - Kim (mr) - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:11

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:11
Hey willem I'm thinking it is not a constant 4x4, because well if i need to go on i'm not taking any more advice from you. LOLMore drive'n less talk'n
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FollowupID: 18919

Follow Up By: Member - Willem- Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:31

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:31
You speaka da Inglish??Cheers, Willem
Never a dull moment
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FollowupID: 18926

Follow Up By: Member - Kim (mr) - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:12

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:12
Hey willem sorry if it came across as if i was being a prick, it was not intended. As i said to Paul i nearly asked the same Q. myself.More drive'n less talk'n
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FollowupID: 18929

Follow Up By: Member - Willem- Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 09:06

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 09:06
Thats OK Kim, I was bering churlish as well. Wasn't feeling too hot last night and should have desisted in joining in. Nevertheless.............

I remember now that with the old vehicles(pre 1980)which were not fitted with free wheeling hubs when they were manufactured, there was talk of diff wind up although I have never seen the results of such an event happening. Diff wind up could really only happen if the vehicle was driven in 4x4 on a sealed surface i.e. bitumen. In 2x4 the transfer gears, front shaft and diff would run all the time which would then be the same with the rear wheels. I have never heard of diff wind up on the rear wheels. Maybe someonelse on the forum can enlighten us.

I mentioned Constant 4x4 because the only manufacturer to get it right from the start was Leyland, with the Range Rover. Toyotas have not had a happy ride with constant 4x4 since they introduced it in the 90's. I do not know about other makes. Automatic hubs were a disaster for heavy duty offroad work.

My old truck gets gearbox wind up if I am in low range for a while. This necessitates the truck being reversed for say 10 to 20 metres before the gearlever will disengage from 4x4 back into 2x4. It was the same with my Toyota and really bad with my F100.
Cheers, Willem
Never a dull moment
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FollowupID: 18955

Reply By: paul - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:18

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:18
Kim

you're displaying prick tendencies which will get you banned from this forum, and rightly so. If you have something constructive to say then state your opinion. If not please desist with purile attempts at childish humiliation of people that probably know infinitely more than you about many subjects, but perhaps not necessarily 4WD issues.
AnswerID: 27492

Follow Up By: Member - Kim (mr) - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:31

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:31
ease up i very nearly asked the same thing my self, and there was no "prick tendencies" intented. For the record I'm new to 4wding and cant learn things quick enough. And I learn heaps from in here. Sorry if I came across as a prickMore drive'n less talk'n
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FollowupID: 18925

Reply By: Member - Roger - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:58

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 20:58
HI Walrus,
By the sound of your enquiry you have a Part Time 4wd. That is one where the hubs need to be locked to engage 4wd, if so lock these hubs but do not engage the 4wd lever and the front wheels will turn the front diff and the internals in the transfer case thus stiring the oil up and lubricating the drive train. This does not harm the vehicle except as said before you will now use slightly more fuel, so yes its a good practice to run the front axle once a month for 20klm or more.
However I am sure that once you experience real 4wd driving this will be a mute point as you will be hooked just like the rest of us.
If your vehicle is a constant 4wd then there is not this prob as the front axle is always working.
RegardsDodg
AnswerID: 27498

Follow Up By: Tuco69 - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:17

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:17
"If your vehicle is a constant 4wd then there is not this prob as the front axle is always working."

How could it be a constant 4wd, when the manual states that it should be put into 4wd once a month for 20K???

Surely if it is a constant 4wd - then there is no way of taking it out of 4wd!
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FollowupID: 18930

Follow Up By: jeepy - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:48

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:48
Tuco69
What if he is drivng a pajero, a cherokee or an iO.
These 4WD's have a choice of 2WD, 4WD full time, 4WD part time and 4WD Low
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FollowupID: 18933

Follow Up By: Allyn (Pilbara) - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 09:32

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 09:32
Roger
I thought the idea of doing the 20 km's was to rotate the crown wheel which in my line of thinking means just engaging 4WD for a few rotations of the front wheels to get the crown wheel lubricated (20 KM's not necessary but hey - it's not far) .
I'm no expert and will gladly stand corrected if this is not so (please advise). Locking the hubs will certainly lubricate other areas though.

Just when I thought I understood !Next Trek - Callawa Rd
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FollowupID: 18962

Follow Up By: Member - Roger - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 17:20

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 17:20
Hi All,
First, sometimes people change the hubs on auto free wheel hubs to manual therefore as said lock them up and give them a run. On Part time 4wd when you lock the hubs up, this then turns both front axles and diff plus the gear in the transfer case thus ensuring all conponents get an oil bath. This also saturates the oil seals helping to ensure that they remain sealed not drying out, there have been cases where the seals suffer damage from the pounding they cop when the shafts are in one position only. There is a name for this but it eludes me at the moment. I have had various 4wd vehicles over the last decade or so and have always given them a run with the hubs locked just to ensure the aforementioned and never had trouble, however they were all part time 4wd vehicles. In fact every time I travel on a gravel road I usually engage 4wd to give every thing a run. After all you pay for it all so why not use it.
RegardsDodg
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FollowupID: 19007

Reply By: Martyn (WA) - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 22:09

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 22:09
Walrus,
My 50 cents worth is don't engage the 4wd until you have the front hubs locked in, if you do the front drive shafts move around inside the drive hubs, not pretty, the damage isn't cheap. As mentioned in other replies, just locking in the front hubs should be enough to get things moving, I don't believe you need to physically engage the transfer case.Keep the shiny side up
AnswerID: 27522

Follow Up By: charlie - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 23:54

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 23:54
Don't want to sound like a prick Martyn but in my old MQ this never caused a problem. Had the hubs locked and took it in and out of 4wd quite often on the beach etc. Never any damage to the hubs or axles. Maybe it is different in newer fourbies. I really am not being a prick but from the looks of this post it might be a way to get away with it from now on. All you need to say is "not being a prick" Hehe.

Just kiding

Charlie
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FollowupID: 18946

Follow Up By: Peter L - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 12:29

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 12:29
Charlie, what Martyn said is correct. Lock the hubs but DON'T engage 4x4. as locked 4x4 on bitumen is a no no.(Walrus' initial post said they do NOT go offroad.)

Charlie also indicated that engaging 4x4 with the hubs unlocked was not a good practice.
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FollowupID: 18974

Reply By: Michael - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 18:18

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 18:18
Walrus. drive on the footpath on the way to work, you'll probably avoid some heavy traffic and its safer because all the accidendt happen on the road LOL.. Michael
AnswerID: 27599

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