walking driving lights

Submitted: Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:15
ThreadID: 6516 Views:1660 Replies:13 FollowUps:12
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Does any have any ideas about how I can stop my driving lights dissappearing in the car park, other than have the sort they don't want in the first place. Are there any methods to at least slow down someone with slippery fingers?
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Reply By: donc - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:19

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:19
Steve, I did see somewhere a while ago, not too long though, a ad for some lock nuts for driving lights, they replace the standard nuts used with a nuts similar in principal to the lock nuts used on alloy wheels to stop them going walkabouts

Hope this helps if I remember where I saw the ad I'll let you know
AnswerID: 27506

Reply By: Eric - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:26

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:26
you can give the nuts a smat tack weld on the thread , on my rally 4000 I used thode no head bolts upside down with the tread in the upper section , to get to the nut you need to undo the allan key bolts first ,
AnswerID: 27509

Reply By: Phil R - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:27

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:27
Take their fingers off.....
AnswerID: 27510

Follow Up By: BJ42turbo - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 18:20

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 18:20
I second this, Bloody mongrels, I dont know about other people but I am sick and tyred of my Possesions either being pinched or vandilised.............Dazz
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FollowupID: 19016

Follow Up By: Member - Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Aug 13, 2003 at 21:51

Wednesday, Aug 13, 2003 at 21:51
Yes, a high vantage point and a decent scope on your .222 magnum is a good start, no court in the land would convict you!So many places to go!
So much work to do :0(
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FollowupID: 19165

Reply By: Martyn (WA) - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:34

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:34
Steve,
As mentioned by Donc, I have a similar design to a locking wheel nut on my IPF lights, they're still there. If you try your local Super Cheap or Marlows the locking wheel nut have the diameter and pitch on the box you should be able to find one to suite, you might have to fit four lights so you get value for money................... God argument if I ever heard it. Keep the shiny side up
AnswerID: 27514

Reply By: johnsy - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:37

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 21:37
Set your lights up on a steel sq tube then to attach the bar to your bullbar using two bolts spot weldered from under the bar so all you need are two wing nuts to take the permantly set lights off. About 1min to do mine and put them inside the vehicle.
AnswerID: 27515

Follow Up By: Haldo - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 18:36

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 18:36
Johnsy's idea sounds the best.
Remove the temptation from those thieving ferals.
If there's nothing to steal they 'may' go elsewhere.
Send me an email and I'll knock some ideas up for you.
Once you have the lights securely mounted to the removable bar they'll pretty much keep their aim, as long as you have limited tolerance with the holes for the mounting bolts.
NOTE......any wiring should be secured inside the engine bay, away from fiddly fingers who might delight in trying to short them out.
Best of luck,
Haldo
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FollowupID: 19017

Reply By: Member - Rick - Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 22:58

Monday, Aug 11, 2003 at 22:58
hiya steve, we simply took the lights to a machine shop and had them drill a hole about halfway along the bolt, just big enough to place a small padlock through.
works a treat.

rick.
AnswerID: 27530

Reply By: mrdesmo - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 01:02

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 01:02
Hi steve c,
Was in 4WD Megastore (Kings Park) just the other day looking at a set of spotty locknuts, $23 for the pair. Or like Rick said, drill a hole in the thread and whack in a padlock, you can get these neat square padlocks from Bunnings with a straight bolt rather than a U shaped bolt so they don't hang down too far. Was planning on this option, as a locknut can still be undone with a set of vicegrips. Only problem I can see with the padlock option though, is if you're like me and have them permanently fixed to the bullbar then what do you do when the padlock rusts/jams and you can't unlock it? (with the sqaure shaped padlock...)
Cheers
AnswerID: 27538

Follow Up By: steve c - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 01:17

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 01:17
Thanks for taking the time to reply with some good ideas.
At least now my blue heeler can take a break from being tied to the bull bar when we're in doing the shopping!

Steve c
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FollowupID: 18950

Reply By: Wazza (Vic) - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 06:18

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 06:18
I have always wondered if you could take the 'normally closed/earthed' circuit of your alarm system (if it has one) and run a wire under the washer/lock nut. That way when the wire is cut, or when the nut is undone allowing the wire no longer be earthed to the driving light/body then the alarm will go off??
Cheers,
Wazza
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AnswerID: 27540

Follow Up By: Michael - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 17:27

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 17:27
Gday Wazza, you are on the money,,,,, I think its Jaycay electrinics , they have an alarm that protects driving lights only, cheap too Michael
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FollowupID: 19009

Follow Up By: Michael - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 17:28

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 17:28
That should be Jaycar Electronics
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FollowupID: 19010

Reply By: Steve from Armidale - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 08:53

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 08:53
Cibie have lock nuts for their lights. If yours have similar threads have a look.

Steve from Armidale
AnswerID: 27547

Reply By: David N. - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 10:09

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 10:09
I unfortunately often have to park at the airport for days at a time.
I have discovered that none of the above methods seem to work with a determined thief... I have lost Cibie Super Oscas, IPFs and Hellas.
4th time around I now have el-cheapoes from supercheap (round ones which are not too bad- cost $39 the pair. I compared the rectangular ones which are not as good.. ) and so far they're still there. (Sad indictment on society I'm afraid.)
AnswerID: 27554

Follow Up By: Old Jack - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 10:34

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 10:34
Any thing that has a bolt or allen screw in it should be relaced with TORX drive or saftey screw, most people dont carry these around(unless you own a jeep as they are held together with them).
unfortunalty there are people out there that will overcome most things short of welding them on & thats a pain to you as well.
Just shows how un secure parking at the airport is :( spare parts supermarket)

one problem that comes about is that if they cant take things they end up smashing them.
have had a number of differant lights on my own rigg's, had a few pinched while at work in the wrong parts of town. have found the NARVA lights work well and are in-expensive(read they don't bother nicking them like the $400 a pop lights they can get a few bucks for down the pub!
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FollowupID: 18966

Reply By: Savvas - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 10:30

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 10:30
Jaycar have a kit that sets off the car alarm if the lights are disconnected.

Check - www.jaycar.com.au and look for item number KC5337
AnswerID: 27556

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 10:48

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 10:48
I think wiring up some form of explosives to the lights with a 15second timer to allow POS to get away from car.. POS undoes wire for light, timer starts, then lights explode blowing POS to bits..

Now using the right amount and type of explosive is critical, as is placement...

You dont damage the car.. Body parts and blood wash off paint work (ask Harold Scruby), but a nasty big burn mark on the bonnet would suck.

I work on the theory if I cant have them then neither can you..

YMMV
AnswerID: 27560

Follow Up By: David N. - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 14:59

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 14:59
sounds good to me!
Where do I buy the kit?
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Follow Up By: flappan - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 15:32

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 15:32
Sign me up too Truckster.
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 15:52

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 15:52
They would be available in USA, they are all Gun/Explosive freaks over there..

Lived in South Dakota for a year.. never again..
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FollowupID: 19000

Follow Up By: Michael - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 17:35

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 17:35
Hey Truckster, there is not many people i hate but that Harold Scruby is a right royal wanker. He is number one on my hate list. i havn't even got a second person on the list, he is it. I wonder if he actually drives a car, probably like that other dill, Bob Carr, he's the ultimate greenie , doesn't even drive, easy for him to agree to closing tracks and trails. They are of no interest to him at all.
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FollowupID: 19011

Reply By: Janset - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 19:16

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 19:16
Hi guys.

I have used this method both for my super oscars and my HF radio aerial and as yet the system has not let me down, and it is cheap.

Screw the nut up to it's locked position. Now look for a piece of pipe, usually water pipe works most of the time. To gauge the correct size of the pipe required, fit a socket onto the securing nut. The pipe should just fit over the socket.

Cut the pipe to about 8 - 10 mil longer that the remaining thread under the nut.

You now you have a very short length of pipe. Now find or make a washer that fits over the threaded stem and is wide enough to protrude a bit wider than the short bit of pipe that is now sitting over the nut.

Weld the washer to the short bit of pipe. Now unscrew the securing nut and slip the washer over the thread and rewind on the nut.

You will soon see that you can not do it up without the correct sized socket (which fits up inside the piece of pipe)

This system is not fool proof, but it makes very hard work for the intended thief as he now has to have the exact sized socket to access the securing nut.

What I try to do is to use those e'cheapo sockets as they are usually thinner walled then the better quality and if you can get a piece of pipe that just fits over the cheaper socket then all the better.

Cheap but very effective.

Regards
AnswerID: 27610

Follow Up By: Mark - Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 20:18

Tuesday, Aug 12, 2003 at 20:18
Janset,
I use the same principal on my bolt on awning, actually I stole the idea from the Cable TV networks as they use this "security shield" principal to stop people connecting up the cable TV for free (or used to before encryption etc). It works well as the shield will just spin until the correct size tool is inserted, of course as you say i'm sure they would get them off if they really wanted to, but the harder you make it the more likely they are to move on to easier pickings.
Cheers
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FollowupID: 19031

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