David Carnegie Rd (WA)

Submitted: Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 08:59
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Hi gang,

For those who may be interested I have had additional info attached to the David Carnegie Rd Trek Note on this site.

I covers the Breaden Bluff Caves and nearby aboriginal ceremonial grounds. There is lots to see and it’s a great bit of country very close to the main track heading north to Empress Spring.

I you are heading up that way it well worth a stop and look.

Cheers

Phil
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Reply By: Willem - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 11:02

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 11:02
Thanks Phil


Drove right past it so to speak. Didn't even know it was there. But then again, there is lots one does not know about. Maybe next time around.


Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil B (WA) - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 11:23

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 11:23
Hi Willem,

Like you I drove passed these sites many times heading elsewhere not knowing they were so close to the road.

I have also heard that Mr Tjukayirla RH (the manager) has found some previously unknown caves that have aboriginal art in them, they are not far from the roadhouse.
These has since been viewed by Museum WA staff and relevant aboriginal authorities.
Since then the word is getting out that the general population can now go and see them.

I have yet to crack exact info on the whereabouts of these caves. Would love to track them down.

Cheers
Phil.
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 12:55

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 12:55
Hi Phil
We are heading up that way in August, so I have taken down the details and will check them out. Thanks for that.

Cheers

Stephen
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Reply By: Member - Mick O (VIC) - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 13:05

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 13:05
Thanks Phil,

I was working off old notes last time and missed them entirely. Are you the one who posted the camp site near the Pikalu Rock Holes in the Places section? If so, is there a photo or a bit more info available.

Hopefully back out that way later in the year.

Cheers Mick
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil B (WA) - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 18:33

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 18:33
Hi Mike
No it wasn't me re Pikalu camping. But they are just a few hundred metres to east of a very large area that is suitable for camping. It has lots of trees for shelter from the winds as well.
It could probably camp about 40 vehicles.
It was an old Exploration camping area and as disused airstrip is nearby. I have the plt and wpts as well.

Below find an extract from my trip notes for that section of the trip.

When we reached the David Carnegie Road turn off, we headed north. Found the track to the overgrown old airstrip drove along it and up a stony rise to the end of the vehicle track. Walked over the ridge in a northerly direction to the caves. They were massive; head high in places and up to 6 to 8 metres deep and at that extremity they were still 800 mm high.
There were dozens of caves; some were connected or separated by a pillar of rock. Found three grinders.
Lots of the caves had pseudo bitumen. One had a stock of fire wood hidden up inside, it looked like it had been there for countless years.
Most of the rock was red and friable. We also spotted introduced rocks such as quartz. One rock in particular had been flaked; pieces had been chipped off for use as knives and the like.
What an amazing place, you could walk around the area for hours poking about.
It was getting late so we returned to the airstrip and found a great spot to camp amongst some mulga to the west of it.
Next day we returned to the Breaden Caves and walked across the top of the breakaway to the north heading for the aboriginal ceremonial sites.
Two gullies north of the caves we spotted a number of standing stones. We walked down onto the flat and although it was very rocky we saw all manner of standing stones, stone pathways, and circular stone arrangements and cleared sleeping areas. Also to be seen were a numbers of grinders and core stones (chips were taken off these for other uses).
A core stone is usually, jasper, chalcedony or quartzite. We spent 2½ hours (round trip) exploring this most fascinating area.
On the southern lip of the breakaway we found a number of deep gnamma holes.
Near the NE end of the old airstrip we discovered the Pikalu Rockholes. Only one had moisture in the bottom and this had attracted bush bees.
Below hopefully if I have done it correctly find soe photos.

Image Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found

Hopefully the above has been of some help. Happy to help more if I can.

Phil
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