Compressed Air

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 21:37
ThreadID: 65504 Views:2569 Replies:11 FollowUps:6
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Has anyone had experience in converting a disused fire extinquisher into a compressed air tank for off road travel?
I have a tank that is tested to some 300psi with a capacity of 9.5 Litres. Have experimented by pumping to 80psi but not going further without more investigation.

Graeme
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Reply By: Andrew-rodeo - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 21:45

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 21:45
Have u thought of using an old BBQ gas bottle? they are test to a much higher presure.
Cheers Andrew
AnswerID: 346455

Reply By: qubert - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 22:03

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 22:03
they should handle at least twice their test pressure
AnswerID: 346458

Reply By: Member - John - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 22:20

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 22:20
Yes, have used one, worked very well, fitted a drain valve etc.
John

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AnswerID: 346462

Reply By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 22:35

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 22:35
Hi Graeme,

First use, fill it till it splits, second use back off a bit!

Easy as!

Now for the sensible answer,

An operating pressure of 300psi and no internal corrosion will give you a huge safety margin at 80psi.

I'd just keep running it to 80psi and drain the condensate very regularly but I'm no expert on hydrostatic testing.

If you are really worried look up "Hydrostatic Testing" in the Yellow Pages and you'll find someone who will, if it passes, re-certify the cylinder for you.

Geoff,

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AnswerID: 346466

Reply By: Member - William H (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 23:02

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 23:02
Hi all

I have a dive tank, which is in survey, and holds 3,500 PSI, this will pump up a tyre from 12psi to 40psi in nine seconds, and is the safest way to go,,people look when i go to pump up the tyres when im down at the car park, after iv been to the beach, and out comes the "grab and go" pump up the tyres, and out of their,while they are still getting out the air hose and pump, you can also put a tyre back on the rim. and seven dollars to fill it up at the dive shop.

Cheers for now....William H...from...Bunbury...WA.

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AnswerID: 346474

Follow Up By: qubert - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 23:09

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 23:09
i hope they are deformaties in the cover and not the tank....................
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FollowupID: 614466

Reply By: Crackles - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 23:07

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2009 at 23:07
A 9L water fire extinguisher is fine for an air tank. Mine uses an ARB diff lock cut off switch set at 90 PSI.
Cheers Craig...............
AnswerID: 346477

Reply By: Flywest - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 01:16

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 01:16
ARB Compressor and 5 Liter Extinguisher works fine for me!



You can see I fitted a tubeless tyre valve & stem to the shoulder of the extinguisher for filling!

The extinguisher was discharged, cleaned with the neck fitting removed, drilled, cleanbed again and the valve stem fitted!

Neck fitting re fitted and Air then plumbed from the tribber outlet to the vehicles plumbed air lines front and back etc.









Its admittedly a little "amateurish" in that it is all done with commoinly available garden variety harware fittings - but it works OK and inflates tyres in a reasonable time - allows me to run a rattle gun for the wheel studs in brief bursts if required changing a wheel etc - last of all replacement parts are easey to come by.

Call it the "McGuyver" Air solution...

ARB Compressor
Air Line
Extinguisher
Air snap locks
A lot of cable ties!

Others might do it differently - I seldom use it - and make sure no ones in the vehicle or immediate environs when I do, just in case something lets go!

80 psi is all you need!

Cheers
AnswerID: 346506

Follow Up By: gottabjoaken - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:44

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:44
Looks like a neat setup, but I think I would be tempted to paint the tank another colour. Silver perhaps.

I wouldn't want any frantic hero trying to rip it off in the middle attempting to rescue me and mine....

Ken
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FollowupID: 614545

Follow Up By: Flywest - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 13:47

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 13:47
Good Idea Ken,

It's behind the rear passenger seat so no one can see it and I have a loaded Extinguisher in plain view on a bracket inside the canopy on the back of Effie for fires / rescue of others etc.
(and 2 more in the boat).

All the same it's never safe to assume anything, so painting it isn't a bad idea at all!

Thanks for the tip!

Cheers
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Reply By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:37

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:37
This does not really answer your question but I have seen a couple of air tanks used on 4wd's that came from a fireman's breathing setup. These tanks are a lot smaller and lighter then the normal scuba gear but have the same very high pressures.

.
AnswerID: 346544

Reply By: Ken - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:51

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:51
Graeme, I take it you are talking about the water filled stored pressure extinguisher tank. These are generally stainless and as you say tested to 300 psi, their normal pressure is about 120 psi.
The make excellent air receivers and being stainless don't rust. A drain would be good though to keep water out of the airline.
I have used one for years at the max pressure that a Big Red compressor can produce [about 90-100 psi].
They are far lighter than gas bottles also.

Ken
AnswerID: 346603

Follow Up By: Member - Sam (NSW) - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 07:37

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 07:37
any idea where a bloke could pick one up?

am looking to put a more permanent air setup in the Patrol
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FollowupID: 614723

Follow Up By: lladoog - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2009 at 22:07

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2009 at 22:07
Thanks for your input Ken. The tank I have has a capacity of 9.5 litres. I inflated it to a pressure of 120 psi and it barely inflated a 14" trailer tyre that I deflated completely, so I doubt it would go far on my trucks 16" wide tyres. Little reluctant to presurise too far. As you have had yours for sometime how do you go inflating your 4WD tyres, or don't you use it for this purpose?

I know you have replied to this before but I could not open the response

Thanks and regards
Graeme
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FollowupID: 617843

Reply By: Ken - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 10:47

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 10:47
Sam, they are hanging off walls everywhere !!

Only joking, I got mine from a building being demolished and they are sometimes at Trash & Treasure markets.

Ken
AnswerID: 346713

Reply By: Ken - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:13

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:13
Graeme, I have not tried to inflate a tyre from the tank, it would need a very high pressure to get in enough air for a 265-75 X 16 from flat .
I mainly use it for blowing up lilos etc, turn it on a few minutes before getting to camp and also to top up tyres after deflation. I use a Big Red compressor which has a reasonable output but nowhere near an airconditioner but while checking tyre pressure, putting on valve caps and moving to the next tyre it catches up.
I think you may have been trying to have something to use without a compressor [??] but I reckon you would need a tank that can operate at a very high pressure, way beyond what a servo compressor can put out.
There is a product called I think Easy Air which looks like a scuba tank but not cheap.

Regards,
Ken
AnswerID: 349696

Follow Up By: lladoog - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:37

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:37
Ken, we are on the same wave length here, my thoughts exactly, although always hopeful of an easy alternative answer.
Thanks for input.
regards
Graeme
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FollowupID: 617987

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