Which type of chainsaw do people use for camping?

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 10:56
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I'm off soon for 6 months around Oz, I would like to carry a small chainsaw with me, (only for fire wood). But which brand and size. I looked at Stihl, but they cost more then I want to spend, as it would sit idle for a long time when I get home. Do the cheaper ones stand up, or is it :you get what you pay for" with chainsaws?

Thanks
Wato
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Reply By: Ron173 - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:02

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:02
Talon from big W
AnswerID: 346514

Follow Up By: DaveO*ST-R - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:14

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:14
I also have a Talon with 14" bar from Bunnings. It cost me around $175? 12 months ago. Great little saw for my occasional use in the yard & for throwing in the 4x4.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:32

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:32
Ditto repeato

Got my little talon from Mitre 10 4 years ago for $160. Has never given me a minutes trouble and has done a lot of camping trips.

SPEND the extra $50 on a little 12 volts sharpener (get them from mower shops) to keep the blades sharp. That is unless you really know how to use a file.

Jim.

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Reply By: bruce - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:12

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:12
From experience , I think you are wasting your time and money with a chainsaw for that sort of trip...there are lots and lots and lots of people doing exactly the same trip as you and just how much fire wood do you expect to see ?...there is not very much about unless you go of the beaten track and really search for it....better off to take a bow saw and an axe , but if you reckon that is the way to then any cheapy should do the job...just keep it sharp and keep it clean and it should be o.k.
We made up a fire container out of a spinner from an old twin tub washing machine...put a door on it , legs , a grate near the bottom for the fire and a grate on the top for a billy to sit on , we have a frypan that fits neatly on the top....a few hand fulls of twigs or small branches and we can cook up a feed and have a cuppa in very little time....cheers
AnswerID: 346517

Reply By: Crackles - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:19

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:19
It's definately you get what you pay for when it comes to chainsaws particually in relation to safety features, ease of use, speed & reliability, but............ in your case this saw is in all reality not going to see very much use so an elcheapo will do the job you are asking & more likely than not last you many many years.
Putting the brand aside you will find chainsaws are banned in many parks & reserves around Australia & unless travelling though the High Country I find are not generally required particually if all you're after is a bit of firewood. (Carry a multi purpose axe instead)
Which type of saw do I use? Stihl/Shindaiwa/Husqvarna.
Cheers Craig...........
AnswerID: 346518

Reply By: Member - Kevin J (Sunshine Coa - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:26

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:26
Camped our way from east to west across the top and back again.
Had fires for cooking etc but never found the need to carry a chainsaw.
If you are into BIG camp fires then they might be the go but a good sharp axe and a bit of practice will keep you fed without a major burn up.

Kevin J
AnswerID: 346521

Reply By: Member - Porl - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:32

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:32
I take a bow saw, amazing how much wood you can get through, and how good the exercise is for you.

I have a 14" echo, more safety features than any other brand I believe, but you know, mixing fuels, running out of chainsaw oil, constant cleaning, ear muffs, eye protection, gloves, and keeping it away from your other stuff cause the chain on every chainsaw drops oil, i leave it behind.

Of course there are moments you would want one for trees across the road but unless your travelling high country, and there's not much around the Oz, take the bow saw.

I've been around Oz in 6mnths, never saw a tree across a road, in my opinion you just won't have time to get to those high country forestry tracks.
AnswerID: 346526

Reply By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:44

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:44
gday guys

this is why we always carry one with us..................its on our last gathering. we had 4 trees down after a storm,without it we would have been stuffed.Image Could Not Be Found
AnswerID: 346533

Follow Up By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:17

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:17
Mark I don't see much safety gear being used other then earmuffs. From what can be seen in the photo I could cut everything there very quickly with a bow saw.

Chainsaws are great but having seen the damage they can do without the safety gear I will stick to my bow saw (as long as it's a soft wood :-))

.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:35

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:35
KIWI KIA

no workcover where we were mate.....................anyhow 4 big gum trees would have taken all nite to cut up with a bow saw.

we would have been back at the camp site HOURS b4 you would have messed around with your saw..................:-)))))


cheers.
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Follow Up By: Dion - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 11:45

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 11:45
The earmuffs were probably more to stop saw dust and chips lodging in the ears and keeping them clean that block out noise. That's why I wear ear muffs when chain sawing.

Cheers,
Dion.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:20

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:20
You don't need one once you leave the high country. Chainsaws are banned from many national parks. We carry a bow saw.
AnswerID: 346539

Reply By: austastar - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 13:40

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 13:40
Big bow saw and a smaller one for light work.
Light weight (sharp) axe.
Chain for pulling.
Have demolished trees with that lot.

cheers
AnswerID: 346558

Reply By: Member - John and Val W (ACT) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 14:22

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 14:22
Have never carried a chainsaw, just a sharp axe. That is all you will need providing you keep your fires to a reasonable size ie enough to cook BBQ and provide some warmth without being a bonfire. As others have said wood is scarce in many areas. In northern parts and desert areas any wood that you find will be small enough not to need much cutting anyway.
Cheers,
Val.
J and V
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AnswerID: 346566

Reply By: furph - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 14:33

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 14:33
Last year we camped at the De Grey river (WA).
Got the little McC chainsaw out to cut a bit of firewood, by mid afternoon had made over $100 cutting wood for other campers.
Its funny how the bowsaws vanish when there is someone with a chainsaw handy!
You wont regret getting a small cheap one
furph
AnswerID: 346571

Follow Up By: P7OFFROAD Accredited Driver Training - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 14:59

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 14:59
I bought, and have already been ridiculed... a little 18 volt rechargeable Black and Decker one and it is fantastic... no need to carry fuel, no smell, and it works really well...


(i also understand it's limitations and am not about to start sawing anything that is beyond it's capabilities.)


We keep it in the truck and use it at our training centre for keeping the regrowth back from the tracks, only 3kgs, I am very, very happy with my purchase.


cheers

Dave
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Reply By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:00

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:00
I use a Stihl. bit more expensive but very good product - link follows

Stihl Chainsaw

Light and a real workhorse. Any one that only carries a hand saw does not go into heavily timbered 4 x 4 tracks or remote rarely used tracks. I have spent 4 hours chainsawing through fallen trees to progress a further 200 meters on a track to our camp at Archers Point FNQ. Handy to have and I carry one all the time, As stated above amazing how many people will love the fact you have one on board. Cheers Tony
AnswerID: 346591

Follow Up By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:09

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:09
" Any one that only carries a hand saw does not go into heavily timbered 4 x 4 tracks or remote rarely used tracks."

Utter rubbish !

nuff said.
.

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Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:34

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:34
Kiwi Kia - No not Nuff said use your silly little hand saws on this stuff and Kms of it too.
Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

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I sick to my satement - I see this often. Cheers Tony
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Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:36

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:36
Looks like my T disappeared :-)
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FollowupID: 614611

Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:45

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:45
Also forgot to tell you that the people that were trying to tow and chop all those logs out of the way were ever so happy when I came along with the trusty old Stihl and then proceeded tofollowed me and pulled all the logs out of the way as we cut our way down the track. ;-). Now Nuff said. Tony
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Follow Up By: Crackles - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:01

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:01
Reread the original post......."I would like to carry a small chainsaw with me, (only for fire wood)"
I reckon a bow saw or axe would cover his requirement. Now Nuff said ;-)
Cheers Craig.............
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Follow Up By: Member - Fred G NSW - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:14

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:14
Tony, that's very impressive stuff, and I will mention I always have my Stihl in the back, for reasons of my own, but hey mate, read the question, Wato clearly stated he only wanted a saw for cutting firewood, so a bow saw and axe will certainly suffice, unless his campfires are bloody infernos.
Fred.
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FollowupID: 614625

Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:17

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:17
Craig - Yep have to give you that one, Thats how I got all the answers wrong at school too :-) forget to reag and understand the question, already done above too. But in saying that I got ridiculed for saying " Any one that only carries a hand saw does not go into heavily timbered 4 x 4 tracks or remote rarely used tracks." In that context and unfortunatly not in the post context, I'll stick by my statement - OOPS & thanks for that. Cheers Tony
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FollowupID: 614626

Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:21

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:21
Ta Fred & what I said to Craig ;-) Cheers Tony
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FollowupID: 614628

Follow Up By: Member - Fred G NSW - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:25

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:25
Sorry Tony, follow ups overlaped there, didn't mean to echo Craig, and I respect your timber cutting ability :-)). Cheers from Fred.
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FollowupID: 614629

Follow Up By: get outmore - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 17:03

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 17:03
pffft so what wold you do if you had real logs over the tracks rather than a bit of windblow twigs in the photo?
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Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 17:17

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 17:17
get outmore - Not sure who you are talking too - But thats the stuff I am talking about, you do not always have a camera with you. Have Cut many a tree that size on tracks up my way, takes quite a bit of work with a small chainsaw as well. Like this:-

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Cheers Tony
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Follow Up By: Crackles - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 17:47

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 17:47
"so what would you do if you had real logs over the tracks rather than a bit of windblow twigs "

I'd use a real saw like a Stihl 660 magnum ;-)
Cheers Craig......

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FollowupID: 614800

Follow Up By: Dion - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 20:49

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 20:49
Hey Crackles,
Stihl Magnums, a guy after my own heart! Best saw I've ever owned. Can't wait for the weather to get cold to get the Magnum out and running again.

Cheers,
Dion.
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FollowupID: 614832

Reply By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:39

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:39
Hi Wato,
You don't happen to carry a generator in your travels too?

If you do have a look at the electric chainsaws, some of these units go quite well!

Look at it this way, if you have a generator you are carrying fuel and an extension lead anyway so you may as well use them.

I'd look at Dave from P7Offroad's option of a rechargeable unit too. Couple of batteries and you'll power through the firewood.

Geoff

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AnswerID: 346610

Reply By: Robin Miller - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 10:32

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 10:32
Hi Wato

Chainsaw has saved us more times than the winch and always carry one, recently researched this again and father Xmas brought me a Stihl miniboss MS170 for the car.

Normally I carry an 18 inch chainsaw but I needed something more compact that could do the job, Stihl is the most compact you can get and also a great but overpriced saw. ($360).

Mine actually fits in the rear mudguard hollow of my GU which has the cover panel removed and a special bracket made to hold it permanently.
Robin Miller

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AnswerID: 346711

Follow Up By: Rolly - Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 01:26

Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 01:26
A local tree pruning service uses these little Stihl things.
His only complaint is that the tiny motor works so hard that he seems to be forever sharpening the chain!!
He reckons that he's getting 2x the service per dollar he ever got from any other popular brand except Husqvarna, which he maintains are nearly as good.

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FollowupID: 614876

Reply By: OzTroopy - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 21:17

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 21:17
For Firewood

Chuck a big bit on the fire and let it burn through ... push both pieces back into the centre and watch the process start again.

A bowsaw ... with a decent length blade ( more cut per push pull ) and as I have found ... a cheap, on special, tungsten tipped carpenters saw manages quite well ... up to 4" timber. Normally buy a new one every trip as they are a general use item around home as well.
AnswerID: 346796

Reply By: Axel [ the real one ] - Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 10:53

Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 10:53
Small but lots of grunt , Stihl MS200T , 3.6kg - 35.2cc -1.6 kilowattsis , most tree loppers / climbers saw of choice ,,, perfect for camping firewood , lots of places [read nat parks] have blanket bans on chainsaws , others state that the bar and chain must be removed from the body of the saw when in a nat park, the baby Stihl once the bar is removed is no bigger in size than a 6pk of stubbies so is very easy to pack / conceal ...... as for cost ?? the old " you only get what you pay for " comes to mind , and the Stihl will serve for a lifetime or 3 and still [pun intended] have a good resale value.
AnswerID: 346852

Follow Up By: Pete Jackman (SA) - Monday, Feb 02, 2009 at 14:38

Monday, Feb 02, 2009 at 14:38
Got one, great saw
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

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FollowupID: 615381

Reply By: Best Off Road - Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 22:50

Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 22:50
Despite so many telling you that you don't need a chainsaw, let me assure you bow saws are bloody hard work.

I bought one four years ago and my wife watched me labour with the bloody thing for a long time for little wood.

She told me to fling the bowsaw and get a chainy before I had a heart attack.

Invest $150 to $200 on a cheapie and be happy for evermore.

Don't forget the 12V sharpener though, a blunt chainy is as useful as hip pockets on your jocks.

Cheers,

Jim.

AnswerID: 346962

Reply By: morris_oddbottle - Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 23:17

Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 23:17
Howdy mate!
Re- chainsaws... I got an old McCulloc 'eager beaver' with a 12" bar on it, and it is bloody amazing! the amount of wood that it has powered through is surreal!
And, the wood was old greybox - tough wood!
but with a bit of patience I could easily get through 12 - 18" logs!
(you can pick these up at garage sales etc for about $50-)
As with any chainsaw, the chain will need to be sharp!
Have a HUNK-O-FUN on your adventures!
Cheers,
Mick
AnswerID: 346965

Reply By: x - Sunday, Feb 01, 2009 at 17:20

Sunday, Feb 01, 2009 at 17:20
Wato

It depends where you are going in your six months around Oz.

I have never needed a chain saw in my desert travels. Firewood abounds. OK we have pulled down a few dead trees with snatch straps, but never needed to cut them.

If there is a branch or tree across the track you just drive around.

I started carrying a small bushman saw but have never used it either.

On extended remote trips your enemy is weight. A chainsaw, no matter how small, is going to be in the way.

If you are a day tripper in the high country then it certainly would be useful.

I own a Stihl Farm Boss because until recently I lived in the bush. Its always left at home.

Bob
AnswerID: 347094

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