Outback Frogs,

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:47
ThreadID: 65522 Views:2118 Replies:8 FollowUps:7
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Hi All,

There is a particular species of frog found in our more arid zones around temporary lakes and water courses.

When the season is good they breed like crazy. When the water dries up they burrow into the mud and wait.

They can even basically dehydrate themselves to the point of when dug up look like a dried out old prune.

What the bloody hell are they called?

I can't for the life of me remember!

Geoff

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Reply By: Lex M (Brisbane) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:50

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:50
Cyclorana
AnswerID: 346601

Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:59

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:59
Lex,
You are a champion!

Thanks,
Geoff

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Reply By: GregF - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:02

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:02
I thought that it may a Spade Footed Frog.or something like that. I beleive that they also hang around The Alice
Regards
Greg
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:55

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:55
Geoff
There is also 7 species of fresh water Crabs found in Australia and the ones in Central Aus' do the same , All the creeks in the Channel Country have then, I've also seen then in Attack Creek and along the Carpentaria Hwy area.

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Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:00

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:00
Thanks Doug,

I never knew about the freshwater crabs, makes sense really!

Critters in this country are pretty ingenious!

Geoff

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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:16

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:16
In comparison to Yabbies, Crabs are much more widespread and were observed either directly, or by
burrows, in a great many temporary watercourses as well as in temporary waterholes in watercourses.
Crabs have been recorded in a variety of locations north of about 22º 44' latitude. To the south of this, the
only records in the arid NT are from the Stony Plains Bioregion at Wall Hole (25º 57' 43''; this survey)
and downstream at Charlotte Waters on the lower Coglin Creek (Horn Expedition). There is no record of
Holthusiana in the MacDonnell Ranges Bioregion, either in the more elevated MacDonnell Ranges or in
the other ranges with lower elevation and less relief (height above the plain), such as the George Gill
Range.
Crabs are considered to be abundant in the Dulcie Ranges and Davenport Ranges. Of records to the north
of the MacDonnell Ranges bioregion, the most southerly records were specimens from the Dulcie Ranges
and observation of burrows at a large claypan and Bluebush swamp on Tarlton Downs Station (both at
about 22º 44' S). Specimens or body parts were collected at various other locations including, Junction
Waterhole on the Sandover River, creeks in the Reynolds and Yundurbulu Ranges, including some very
temporary waterholes, waterholes in the eastern and northern drainages of the Davenport Range, both
major and minor drainage lines in the Mitchell Grass Downs and Channel Country bioregions, and a
claypan in the Mitchell Grass Downs.
Holes in banks were also observed in clay/loam banks of minor upland creeks in the Dulcie Ranges and
Reynolds Range; and in a bank of a sandy river bed (Woodforde River) with no waterholes in the vicinity.
Although these observations cannot be confirmed as being burrows of Holthusiana, if they are, then they
may be indicative of a broad range of inundation regimes that the inland crab can tolerate. Alternatively,
they may indicate surprisingly long range dispersal from areas with more frequent inundation regimes.
The distribution and physiology of inland crabs (Holthusiana transversa) were reviewed by Greenaway
(1984) and report that they survive dry periods in ‘dry’ burrows but may depend on some soil moisture to
prevent unsustainable loss of body moisture.
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:12

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:12
Caught one by accident in Sturt Creek near Balgo in about '95.
It was the most aggressive crab I have ever seen. It chased me up the bank!

Cheers,
Peter
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AnswerID: 346616

Reply By: Member - Lionel A (WA) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:31

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:31
Caught a few in Kings Cross, late'91......hehehe.



Cheers.....Lionel.
AnswerID: 346619

Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:41

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:41
Hmm young Lionel I suspect you aren't taking this seriously!

I like that in an Australian!

Geoff

Geoff,
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Reply By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:39

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:39
Wow, how cool is this website?

Have a look at: Savanna Explorer for information on Northern Australia!

Geoff

Geoff,
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Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:59

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:59
Hi Geoff:

Yes, that Savannah Explorer site is terrific. Just took a look.
Trust you are well ...

Cheers
jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 20:10

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 20:10
Hi Jack,
Mate I'm doing great!

If I was doing any better the Tax Office would make a ruling on it!

I heard a rumour you found your piece of paradise in the Hunter Valley, I'm very pleased you did.

I'm glad someone else found the site as interesting as I do.

Geoff

Geoff,
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Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

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Reply By: MEMBER - Darian (SA) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 20:07

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 20:07
We saw the crazy goings-on of outback frogs in the East MacDonnels a few years back - camped by a near dry watercourse and it rained later in the evening - then the creek started to flow slowly - then all hell brakes loose and frogs by the hundred emerge as if by magic from what seemed like solid rock walls - the croaking nearly drove us mad - what they were then doing late into the night should not be shared on a family forum !
AnswerID: 346627

Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 20:11

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 20:11
Maybe that's how you build a family frog forum???

Geoff

Geoff,
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Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

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Reply By: get outmore - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 20:32

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 20:32
many frogs fit that deascription
some common ones are
neobatrachus sutar and N Kunnapalari
AnswerID: 346631

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