wiring diagrams

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 17:59
ThreadID: 65523 Views:6339 Replies:7 FollowUps:9
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1stly..can one have a fully automatic change over charging system so that auxillary batteries can be charged from car when moving, from solar and or genny when stationary without having to turn/flick any switches....i dont want to have to flick switches or swap cables if it can be avoided...

if so....

Who Has A Wiring Diagram? ..

(i could work it out for myself but i'm tooooooo busy fixing cheap airconditioning systems that i didnt install from yesterdays 45.7 degree heat and 43 today ...and not much better for next week or so....roof/s were a lot hotter but).
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Reply By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:09

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:09
Thats my setup to a tee! Will have to sit down & draw up the diagram but I am happy to do it if no one else has one. Let me Know. Cheers Tony
AnswerID: 346608

Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:51

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:51
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Quick drawing complete. Cheers Tony
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Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:55

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:55
The 240 from the Waeco actually comes from the Waeco Control box & auto switces. Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member No 1- Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 04:19

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 04:19
thanks Tony
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Reply By: Louie the fly (SA) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:10

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 18:10
Cool change due next Saturday week. They reckon it will get down to 36C. Our AC carked itself in our office today, and out in the back workshop it got up to 44 with fans a blazing and evap cooler a coolin.

Still, it's only gonna be 40 something again for the next 3 days.

BTW, I know someone in the solar business so he may be able to answer your questions. Natural Technology Systems - 8344 7298. Worth a try.

Cheers

Louie
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Follow Up By: Member No 1- Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 04:19

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 04:19
I'll give him a ring...ta
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Reply By: robertbruce - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:20

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 19:20
I have the wiring diagram for that set up, it's the best way to go, no hassells fiddling or switching.
AnswerID: 346617

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 04:21

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 04:21
ta can you send to
wherethefugawi@hotmail.com
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Reply By: Maîneÿ (wa) has - Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 22:20

Thursday, Jan 29, 2009 at 22:20
My system works the way your asking about.

The Alternator charges the two AGM's when I'm driving.
The Solar system charges them when I'm not driving.

I don't touch anything - it's all done automatically :-)

Nothing special in the way of equipment, the Steca Solar regulator, Solar system, AGM DC's, Rotronics battery Isolator and the Alternator.
Just wire up as directed in the Steca reg installation information, too simple.
(if you need me to draw it PM me)

No other equipment required except 32mm² battery cable between ALL batteries & 10mm² cable for the electronics.

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Image Could Not Be FoundMainey . . .
AnswerID: 346656

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 04:23

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 04:23
mm sent
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Reply By: Member - John and Val W (ACT) - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 09:05

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 09:05
My setup diagram is too complex to make sense here, but stripped of the detail is like this.

A LOAD line runs to all the loads, the consumers - fridges, lights, radios etc. This line also connects to

1) via a 0.01 ohm resister to all auxilliary batteries, each with it's own fuse.
2) solar panels via controller and fuse
3) alternator/cranking battery via controller and fuse
4) output side of 25A battery charger

General principle is that every energy source has it's own fuse close to the source. Not only is this essential for safety, but by inserting or removing fuses it allows easy management of just which battery is doing what.

The 1/100 ohm resister isn't essential, but measuring the very small voltage developed across it gives a simple measure of current flow in/out of the battery/s. (I use a Jaycar meter shunt here and their 200 mV digital panel meters to monitor current and voltage - not as simple as it sounds since the meters need isolated power supplies.)

My whole rig runs on 12V. If 240V is available it simply runs the charger which then delivers more 12V. (Actually I use a variable switchmode power supply as a charger, but that's another story!)

With this arrangement, whatever source/s are available (charger, alternator, solar) will power the loads, with any excess energy going to the battery/s, or the battery/s will pick up the load when necessary, all with no manual intervention.

HTH

John
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

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AnswerID: 346698

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 16:28

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 16:28
"My setup diagram is too complex to make sense here,"...as long as it doesnt involve electronic schematics I'd be able to nut it out
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val W (ACT) - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 18:43

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 18:43
I'll try. Don't know how this image will turn out, but here goes!Image Could Not Be Found


What it does:
Energy can be sourced from the alternator, my 140W solar panels and 25A charger - any or all at once. This feeds into the main central bus which feeds all the loads - the fridge, lights, laptop, gps, chargers for cameras, torches, hf and uhf radios…... etc etc. The battery/s (3 auxiliaries in my case) charge/discharge from/to the bus. They are connected to the central bus via a 0.01 ohm resister (a big 200amp meter shunt). A 200 mV digital panel meter reads the voltage across this resistor and displays it as amps (each amp flowing to/from the batteries produces 10 mV). This metering can be omitted, but is very useful in allowing the health of the system to be monitored. A similar meter (not shown) monitors the voltage at the main bus. (Note that such meters require an isolated power supply - I use little switchmode power supplies from Jaycar.)

The fuses provide protection and allow a lot of flexibility. Fuse 2 allows the main battery to be connected directly to the bus. It is usually not plugged into its socket, but when it is inserted it allows the solar panel etc direct access to charge the cranking battery if need be. If the auxiliary batteries are flat it also allows the cranking battery to power the hf radio, or even keep the fridge running. If the alternator died, and the fuse is installed, my petrol vehicle could even use solar power for ignition! Individual batteries can be selected simply by inserting a fuse, so if one dies it can be disconnected easily.

Hope that helps. Maybe some ideas if not your prefered solution.

Cheers

John
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

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Reply By: Maîneÿ (wa) has - Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 19:13

Friday, Jan 30, 2009 at 19:13
No switch's or gizmo's to adjust, just drive to power the battery system or automatically the Solar system will charge the battery when you turn engine off, power is either taken direct from the Steca reg or from the Aux battery, via a fused cable and 4 way distribution block.

(yes, it's a simple system drawn simplistically too, not every nut & bolt shown
sorry could not send it MM )
Image Could Not Be FoundMainey . . .
AnswerID: 346773

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Sunday, Feb 01, 2009 at 15:45

Sunday, Feb 01, 2009 at 15:45
thats why i sent you my email address...you wally
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Reply By: RV Powerstream P/L - Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 05:21

Saturday, Jan 31, 2009 at 05:21
A BB121250 Smart Charger will accept DC power from all regulated sources .

An old fashioned charger laying unused in the shed,an alternator,
regulated solar.

Connected between the cranking battery and the auxilliary battery it is the split system and charges the auxilliary to 100%.

Connect your charging source to the cranking battery and the BB unit will do the rest and is capable of 50A Capacity 12V to 12V.

Due to its size 280x250x70 it is not suited to some vehicles due to location problems and is not as cheap as others but its capacity to charge up to 50A and to 100% can double useable battery capacity and its potential to extend battery life far outways initial costing.

Ian



AnswerID: 346822

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