slide on camper wiring

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 03, 2009 at 19:24
ThreadID: 66474 Views:2849 Replies:2 FollowUps:7
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I have a slide on camper that is wired with an Anderson plug that is connected to a fuse panel, deep cycle battery,2 x40l fridges ,lights etc.
I now need to wire my car so I can connect to this Anderson plug so the camper battery will charge while driving.
I was thinking about running wiring from my second battery(in car) so that I will not risk draining the starting battery.
What size cable would I need?
Does this require fusing?
Any help photos etc would be great.
Where can I by these items from in WA
Any suggestions would be great
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Reply By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2009 at 20:11

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2009 at 20:11
Hi - Thats my setup -a couple of photos may help. The bigger the wire the better. I have the isolator on my main battery that feeds to the second deep cycle, that connects to the third deep cycle. All batteries charge while I am driving.

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

email me on tonyb@activ8.net.au for full details.

Cheers Tony
AnswerID: 352048

Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2009 at 20:17

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2009 at 20:17
PS - Yes fuse your lines, I used the the large blade type you can get from Repco or Super Cheap - any car part place. I brought the duel battery isolator from Repco, you can get it in a kit for a lot more, but you save heaps doing it yourself and by just buying parts. Have Fun - Tony
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Reply By: offroad Bob - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 09:10

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 09:10
Hi CCC

I have a slide on camper with the anderson plug. Similar to yours mine powers up a lot of gear. Inside it goes through a fuse before getting to the batteries so another one is not needed.

For wiring I purchased a roll of 6mm with a 4.58mm2 cross-section wire from Coventry's - this is the largest auto wire made by Narva. This is rated at 50amp.

Just a word of warning - if your car secondary battery is not the same amp/hour rating as your camper batteries - that is if it is smaller there is a chance your camper will quickly drain your car second battery as they try to pull more than is available when your car is not running.

Can I ask what brand is your camper?

Bob

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AnswerID: 352123

Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 12:05

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 12:05
Bob , where do you get the warning idea from ? If the 2nd car batt [the auxillary] is separated by the controller from the main start batt what difference does the amp hr rating of the 2nd or 3rd or 4th battery have to do with draining , all the batteries bar the main start batt are in effect ONE LARGE battery ,IE; Aux 1=60 amp hr + 2nd aux of 90am hr + 3rd aux of 120 amp hr = in effect and use 1 battery of 270 amp hr capacity.......
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Follow Up By: offroad Bob - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 13:16

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 13:16
Hi Axel

I may not be correct but I understand that when two batteries are connected they will equalise out in power - if one is only 10v and the other is 12v they will come to 11v.

So not counting the start battery which is held behind a battery controller - just the car auxillary battery and the two camper batteries. If the two camper batteries have been drained down while camping and you plug back into the car but not start the car the camper batteries will start draining the car battery - and if they are big deep cycle batteries and the car auxillary is a normal 10 or 11 plater you can drain it quicker than should be.

Again I may not be correct not being an auto electrician and only tinkering with my own kit. If someone does have some knowledge on this it would be good.

The other thing is there are a whole heap of good forum discussions on this previously submitted.

Bob

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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 16:07

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 16:07
Bob, if "if one is only 10v and the other is 12v" replace the 10v one as it is stuffed already. 11.2-11.5 volts is your required minimum. If it is below that the life will be very short.
Cheers,
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John

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Follow Up By: Maîneÿ [wa] - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 16:37

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 16:37
Bob,
you say: "Inside it goes through a fuse before getting to the batteries so another one is not needed"
May I suggest each battery (+) cable requires a fuse as close as possible to the (+) terminal of *each* battery.
The reason being, the current flows from *both* batteries with-in the power system.
If battery (a) has a fuse and shorts half way to battery (b) then the current from battery (a) will no longer run past the blown fuse, however - current from battery (b) will still run along the battery cable to the 'short' and may continue to do further damage !!



With your "equalisation" post, it is technically correct only if the 'isolator' is a dumb or manual switch.
Said *simplistically* with the modern 'smart' isolators, the cranker battery will start the vehicle, then when the crank battery is seen to be fully charged the isolator will then add the auxiliary battery into the charging circuit.
The isolator will automatically disconnect the cranking battery from the auxiliary battery system when the cranking battery is getting down to hypothetical low(ish) voltages (11.?v maybe 12.?v) because of the phenomenon you mention of "equalisation" depending on the type of battery isolator, as they use slightly different disconnect voltages.
Basically the crank battery and auxiliary battery will be reconnected again when the cranking battery is once again seen as fully charged
( for often only a few seconds as can be heard by the 'chattering' of a mechanical solenoid )
This continues till the auxiliary battery system is a similar voltage to the disconnect voltage of the battery isolator and all batteries will then remain connected and charge as just one large battery.

Mainey . . .
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Follow Up By: offroad Bob - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 16:51

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 16:51
Hi Mainey

The anderson plug going into the camper has an inline fuse before getting to the batteries. This is how it came from new. The batteries in the camper then go to a control board that has fuses for everything.

When I was considering 'equalisation' I was only thinking of between the auxillary battery on the car to the two camper batteries. There is not an extra smart battery isolater between them so the camper batteries can just keep drawing on the one auxillary battery until they equalise. If it is like cups of water two against one will make the auxillary get empty fast. Only my way of thinking - not sure.

Bob

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Follow Up By: ccc - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 20:20

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2009 at 20:20
Hi
Its can carry be camper from Candy Canvas .
Thanks for the info

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