Re fitting tapered wheel bearing cones back into hub?

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 20:07
ThreadID: 66928 Views:3483 Replies:8 FollowUps:7
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Just as a matter of interest ,for those do it your self guys and mechanics, what do you use to tap the new bearing cone back into the hub? I,iuse a little brass mallet to start it, and can usually get them down to flush with the housing, but on carefull examination they are sometimes not all the way home, its that final little bit that you can do some damage if not careful or not using the right implement!...lol. Can go bush makanic and sit the old bearing in the cone with a bit of wood across it and seat it home , but Yuck!!.


Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 20:18

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 20:18
I think you mean "cup" rather than cone. "Cone" refers to the bearing.
I use the old cup, over the top of the new cup orientated in the same direction - once the new cup is seated, turn the hub over and the old cup is easily tapped out.
AnswerID: 354588

Follow Up By:- Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 08:13

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 08:13
Yep do the same, have been doing it this way for years. Easierand quicker than using a brass punch!
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FollowupID: 622783

Reply By: Splits - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 20:30

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 20:30
Axle

I just tap them down flush with a hammer and take them the rest of the way with a punch. You can easily feel when they are fully seated.

I was taught to do it that way at work and TAFE in the early 1960s and must have done a thousand since with no problems.

I have never broken a cone, seen anyone else break one or gouged any groves down the side of the hub.

Brian
AnswerID: 354590

Follow Up By: Member - Nick (TAS) - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 20:38

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 20:38
Yep, thats how Ive always done them.
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FollowupID: 622738

Follow Up By: Anthony (Vic) - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:02

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:02
Same here, I used a nail punch to walk the bearing seat into the hub. Once the bear seat is all the way home, you can hear (and feel) a change in the noise from tapping in the bearing seat.

As an alternative to the punch, which I am yet to try, I will grind down the outside surface of an old set of bearing seats so that they will be able to slide as a snug but free moving fit inside the hub and use these to tap in the new set.
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FollowupID: 622744

Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:26

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:26
Anthony, Thinking the same way!, just need that little bit of clearance, should be accurate and easy!.



Cheers Axle.
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FollowupID: 622750

Follow Up By: Anthony (Vic) - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:40

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:40
Axle, getting the new bearing seats started into the hub is a bit tricky, Iike you mentioned.

I tried puting the new bearing seats in a plastic bag and then in the freezer in the camper while I was tapping out the out ones.

But when its hot outside, it dosen't take long for them to warm up again ... I never seem to manage to get the new bearing seats started in the hub first go.

Maybe a piece of 5mm thick flat brass lying on top of the seat and a few light taps with the hammer ...?
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FollowupID: 622751

Reply By: Member - Scrubcat (VIC) - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:35

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:35
G`day Axle,
Never use any punch made of brass,copper, aluminium or similar metals as these materials can (flake, shed, splinter) small pieces off and contaminate the bearing.
As a retired fitter I suggest you use a piece of mild steel, a bolt of sufficient length with the threaded part cut off is ideal.

Scrubby.
I don`t know where i`m going but i`m enjoying the journey.

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AnswerID: 354607

Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:54

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 21:54
Fair enough Scrubby, Will take that on board!...Thanks.



Cheers Axle.
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FollowupID: 622753

Reply By: Shaker - Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 22:47

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 at 22:47
We were taught to linish the edge of the old cup & then use it to seat the new one.
AnswerID: 354618

Reply By: Krakka - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 12:30

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 12:30
You can also buy a set of tools to insert and remove bearings, they are available for around $80 on ebay, look like they would fix the problem.
Krakka
AnswerID: 354698

Reply By: Member - Ian H (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 14:20

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 14:20
When stuck in the bush with the same problem I used a piece of emery paper laid on a flat surface and rubbed the old cup on the outside on the emery to remove just a few thou'. Took about 15 minutes and a couple of number 6's but made a perfect drift to put the new cups home.
AnswerID: 354715

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 16:49

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 16:49
I carry the linished 'old ones' with me, also have the new ones pre-packed with grease & then pack them with our vacuum food machine.
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FollowupID: 622842

Reply By: Pradobob - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 16:01

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 16:01
It definitely helps to freeze the new cup. I use hard plastic-faced hammer to start them square, and then drive them home with a mild steel drift.
AnswerID: 354723

Reply By: Member - Charlie M (SA) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 19:59

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 19:59
I use a brass drift always was told if a mark on cup with brass will not hurt but a mark from a steel punch or chisel can/will score or chip cup. My 2 bob's worth
Cheers
Chass
AnswerID: 354759

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