Give way!!!

Submitted: Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 08:52
ThreadID: 66938 Views:4147 Replies:20 FollowUps:24
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I took these photos on the Ranken Road, Barkley Tablelands, NT in 2007

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I let 'em have the road!!!


Cheers
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Reply By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 09:11

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 09:11
They are bit big to play chicken with ;)

Cheers Kev
Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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Reply By: Member - Wayne David (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 09:57

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 09:57
Strewth!!

Was there radio contact?

What's the drill in such instances?
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Follow Up By: Lotzi - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:13

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:13
G'day Wayne

Give way to heavy vehicles, especially in those conditions ...
It's not a might has right, more, it's you don't know whose behind them in the dust cloud and you can have 1 or 2 metre tail whip on the 2nd or 3rd trailer and you can shelter from stones thrown up.
In wet weather, one of those heavy vehicles can pull you out of a bog, but if the situation is reversed, you won't move them.

Cheers
Lotzi
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Follow Up By: Lotzi - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:15

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:15
And when you look at Willems photos, he has postioned himself right off the road.
Lotzi
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Follow Up By: Willem - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:15

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:15
Wayne

My polkicy is to give way totally, that is completely off the road, on all gravel roads and strip bitumen roads. This amuses some of my friends as they reckon I go overboard but I have had too many windscreens busted. I talk to the trucks on Channel 40 and tell them what I am doing. They are always very grateful as they have a clear run past me.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Lotzi - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:51

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:51
G'day Willem

Yep, off the road in your own time, no panic, safety, no cut tyres ... not hard is it.

Cheers
Lotzi
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Follow Up By: Member - Wayne David (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 12:42

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 12:42
Lotzi & Willem - Gentlmen thanks for the tips and advice.

Based on what I'm seeing & reading, I don't think you are going overboard at all with getting well off the road. That'll be my tactic too if and when I'm in this situation, that is IF time allows.

I must say that I've read a bit about these huge trucks with multiple trailers but as they say 'a picture tells a thousand words' and Willem's pics and some that follow are a real cause for concern.

I was also running with the idea that these professional truckies were pretty switched on using their CB radios to keep all as safe as possible but I guess there are always going to be exceptions, as per that cattle truck photo.

Now I'm wondering if there are times when one should avoid certain roads & just leave them for the trucks. You know, kind of plan to camp and then travel these roads when they're truck free. Or is this just completely unrealistic?

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Follow Up By: Willem - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 14:32

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 14:32
Wayne

It is unrealistic to try to avoid roads where Road Trains are operating as they can be anywhere at any time.

Best thing is to drive to the conditions and get out of the way of an oncoming Road Train.

Last year I came up behind a RT on the Tanami Road and the dust was so severe that I told my convoy that I was backing off and letting the RT get ahead. The RT driver heard our conversation and said that he would pull over and let us through, which was very nice of him.


Cheers
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:06

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:06
We had a guy with a double fuel tanker on the Kalumburu road pull to the RIGHT to let us pass on the LEFT so that we did not get his dust.
After we passed, we chatted and then both stopped for a cuppa.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome

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Follow Up By: Member - Tony B (Malanda FNQ) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 18:06

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 18:06
As they have a job to do I have no problems with road trains, always get off the road for them, mostly you will see them well before you past.
No need for radio talk, they know what you are doing. Sometimes they may feel up to have a chatter, I let them start that. They are more than thankful you did not make them change down 10 gears or so.
Wide loads always have an escort and wave you off the road, so no issue there!
On some heavily trucked roads you will find that there are call stations and manditory to call on Channel 40. These roads also have call station markers. Look for them and you will know where the trucks are. Cheers Tony
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Thursday, Mar 19, 2009 at 08:49

Thursday, Mar 19, 2009 at 08:49
Wayne
See the link I provided at the bottom.

Lotzi
Rule of the thumb is might does have right, if you get off and get bogged the truck can tow you back onto the hard stuff after he gets past you, could you tow a bogged roadtrain back on ....


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Follow Up By: Lotzi - Thursday, Mar 19, 2009 at 11:20

Thursday, Mar 19, 2009 at 11:20
G'day Doug

Yep, that's what I was trying to say, some people think/interpret that just because a heavy vehicle is bigger they expect right of way. We both and others know that is not the case.

Cheers
Lotzi

PS, the Daisy Bates history was a beauty, hadn't read it for years, made me get it out and start reading it again, thanks.
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Reply By: Member - Oldplodder (QLD) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:03

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:03
That's what I like about dirt roads, bit more warning from the dust clouds. :o) Especially if the road has a few bends.

Do you usually confirm by CB you are going to pull over if you can't see them till the last moment? I find they appreciate it.
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Follow Up By: Member - Richard H (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 16:09

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 16:09
My wife & I stopped for lunch number of years ago on the Burke Developmental Road east of Kurumba, when we were new to outback travel.

Pulled off the road a bit, started to prepare some sangers and a triple road train went past. Slight breeze from the south, we're on northern side of a very dusty gravel road.

Instantaneous dirt sandwiches.

We learned the hard way that day!

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Reply By: Member - Footloose - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:36

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:36
Have always adopted the same policy. But I also travel with my lights on.
AnswerID: 354675

Reply By: austastar - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:55

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 10:55
Go to the upwind side if possible
cheers
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Reply By: Member - Richard H (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 11:14

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 11:14
Barrier Highway 90 km east of Broken Hill, a couple of months ago.

I had my van on, came around a bend back behind me, and voila!

The lead escort vehicle wasn't all that far in front of the wide load, no cops present, these rigs were really travelling and I was bloody lucky there was a place I could get over out of the way.Image Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found

Barely had time to get my camera out and switched on to take these.

Dick.

AnswerID: 354686

Reply By: Rolly - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 11:25

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 11:25
So, I'm traveling in the opposite direction with a full load of ammonium nitrate.
Who gives way?
AnswerID: 354687

Follow Up By: Willem - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 11:31

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 11:31
That is a dumb response to this thread.

The post is aimed at outback travellers not commercial type rigs carrying all kinds of stuff
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Follow Up By: Rolly - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 15:12

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 15:12
Just a wisecrack, Willem.
Not a serious reply.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 15:28

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 15:28
sensible reply
these guys are professional drivers and while they might leave LVs to sort themselves out if you listen to your radio you will here them working things out between eachother. their radios arnt onlly for idle chatter to pass the time
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Reply By: Mandrake - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 11:47

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 11:47
A question on speed ...

From memory there is no speed limit in NT is that right ?

So what speed do those road trains travel at ?

Cheers

Mandrake ( future driver of Jeep and CT in NT )
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 12:09

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 12:09
Mandrake

the laws changed last year or there abouts'

NT driving rules



Maximum Speed Limits
Some speed limits and conditions of which you should be
aware:
Built-up area: The speed limit in built-up areas in the
Northern Territory is 60 km/h, unless a sign indicates
that another speed limit applies. Drivers should be
aware that a speed limit of 50 km/h is not uncommon.
Outside Built-up Areas: Outside built-up areas, the
default speed limit is 110 km/h. Other speed limits
may apply in some areas. A speed limit of 130 km/h
applies on some parts of the Barkly, Stuart, Victoria
and Arnhem Highways.
Heavy vehicles:
Buses of more than 5 tonnes Gross Vehicle Mass
(GVM) and other heavy vehicles of more than 12
tonnes GVM must not exceed 100 km/h.
Long and wide loads:
Vehicles travelling under permit conditions may have a
maximum speed limit imposed.

Cheers

Richard
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Follow Up By: Kim and Damn Dog - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 18:44

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 18:44
Richard

The rules;

If they’re coming towards you, get off the road and wait for the dust to clear.

If you wish to pass them, get on the radio and ask the driver when it’s safe to pass.

A word of caution. I’ve come across rigs towing five trailers. And I can tell you there’s a bit of gymnastics going on with the rear end in some conditions.

If the last trailer is weaving all over the road, pull back and start again. Otherwise you’ll be catapulted into the bush.

Normal road rules don't apply with these big rigs and common sense should prevail.

Regards

Kim
Regards
Kim
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 12:03

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 12:03
Margaret snapped this pic in Jasper Gorge NT.
The truck appeared around a blind corner doing about 80kph.
We were still doing 75kph.
One second later we were travelling straight ahead and still doing 60+ with ZERO visability.

Very scarey.
3 minutes later a second went past. Nothing was said on the radio by anyone.
You can not be too careful.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
AnswerID: 354692

Follow Up By: Member - Wayne David (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 13:42

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 13:42
Peter_n_Margaret
As you say "SCAREY".

A question though, how do you manage to even think about snapping a photo at times like this? I just may manage to squeeze out a *&%# , as a stomp on the breaks.......and that's about it.

Another question. Now that you have the snap shot, do you reckon it's worthwhile sending it and story off to the company that employees these blokes? Maybe they'd be interested in corrective management practice such as a standard CB radio policy before someone gets seriously injured.

Just a thought.


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Follow Up By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:00

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:00
I don't get it,
How was the passenger able to pick up a camera, turn it on, take a photo (in focus) in a moving vehicle, with opposing speeds of 150Kph on a blind corner?

Why does the truck driver NEED to do a corrective management practice? whatever that is.

How do you know there was no communication between the trucks, There are 40 channels on UHF as well as 40 on the CB?

I think Wayne David remarks are "well intented" but reeks of "do good" and I'm sure the Transport Industry would LOVE to hear his thoughs on how they run their BUSINESS, every bit as the Transport industry would LOVE to IMPOSE their thoughts on how you should run your holiday.

Shane.

PS Sheild's up



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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:18

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:18
She was taking pics of the Gorge at the time, Shane/Wayne, a fluke.

I guess that we might have missed a transmission. We were scanning at the time on UHF ad would usually pic up something like that. They are almost always on #40.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
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Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 22:10

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 22:10
Peter,
As Shane says talking truck to truck they may have been using ch8 on am cbs so they aren't annoying other people, A common practice since you don't wont to broad cast to far.
Cheers Dave...
GU RULES!!

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Follow Up By: Blaze (Berri) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 22:36

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 22:36
Usually see the dust of these guys well before you see them if you watch ahead. I think I would have been heading further left than your angle seems to show. Lots of good run off area on the side of road there.
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Reply By: Member - Matt & Caz H (QLD) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 13:44

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 13:44
Hey Willem,

This pic was taken on the way to Longreach last year about 1 min before we hear over the UHF "Look out its a wobbly!!!, caravan up ahead please get off the road" So we did!!!!

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Follow Up By: Damo1970 - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 14:52

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 14:52
We had a near identical experience a few weeks ago out that way. I've never been called a "wobbly" before & wondered what the hell they were on about but soon figured it out & got off the road. The escort vehicle & truck were most appreciative, giving us a wave & a big thanks over the radio as they went past.
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Reply By: Member - Fred B (NT) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 14:11

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 14:11
In the NT, goverment road safety advertising is:
for ALL vehicles to pull off the side of the road (single lane roads) to let a road train past, then pull back on after the dust clears. Fully loaded Road trains rarely travel over 80 kmh as they start to sway madly after that. It is extremely dangerous for a road train to pull off to the side; they can bog, or even worse, overturn. A road train can pass you doing 70 k's and it can feel like they are doing the ton!
Fred B
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Reply By: Member - Tour Boy ( Bundy QLD) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 15:59

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 15:59
This was a small "tinny" on the way from Bundaberg to Rocky up the Bruce HwyImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found last thursday
Cheers,
Dave
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Follow Up By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:07

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:07
I saw this baby heading home from Rocky on Thursday as well :)

Cheers Kev
Russell Coight:
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Follow Up By: Member - Tour Boy ( Bundy QLD) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:08

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:08
It may need more than a 15 hp to push it along...
Cheers,
Dave
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Reply By: wendys - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 16:38

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 16:38
We always travel with CB radio tuned to Channel 40. It will pick up talk between heavy vehicles meeting each other, which alerts us that there is traffic approaching us. But most important, it picks up chatter between escort vehicles and their bulky charges - which usually gives us a chance to pick a good spot to get right off the road. With a bit of experience, you get to be able to pick out that type of radio talk a good way in advance. We've found that some of the biggest loads seem to be moved on Sundays - don't know whether that is some sort of policy, or we've just some sort of co-incidence?
AnswerID: 354727

Reply By: Member - Tour Boy ( Bundy QLD) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:17

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:17
Last year when I was working out of Springsure in Central Queensland, I would run into around 20 a day and most were tripples.
A lot of caravans were wiped out on the highways around there due to either the rear trailer swaying and collecting the caravan or just the wind generated blowing it off the road.

I have seen the rear trailer sway up to 7m side to side on the blacktop. You wouldn't see it comming if you passed too close in the gravel, it's hard enough to see the rear of the second trailer due to dust.

As for RT's not driving over 80kph..don't believe it. Whilst doing roadworks on the Carnarvon Hwy, we were always blown off our feet by RT's doing 120kph+ through our 40 zones, Police weren't interested in doing anything about it.

Some company drivers are real cowboys but most private operators are pretty good.

Cheers
Dave
Cheers,
Dave
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Reply By: Lotzi - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:36

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:36
Guy's, everyone's going to have a different view, but the photo's in this thread and comments are a great education for people who haven't been in those situations before.

1. A multi trailer vehicle has what is known as a corner sweep, that is where following trailers track in a little more than the trailer/ prime mover in front, hence they try to run to the outside of the corner to keep the following trailers on the road. They don't do it to be a pain.

2. If you have a look at the edges of the road, it gives a good indication as to safely pulling over to avoid damaging tyres.

3. In the north a lot of the road trains do watch their speed as when they go to hard they are only going to overheat tyres and have blow outs.

4. Also be aware that any swerve/sway on a road train will magnify as it travels down the combination.

Once again, thanks for the photo's, I am sure that DougT will be able to add further comments.

Cheers, good thread, thanks Willem.

Lotzi

AnswerID: 354739

Reply By: Ozhumvee - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 18:44

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 18:44
I'm with Willem and others, get right off the road for oncoming traffic even wobblies, seen too many close calls and the results of not doing so. Time doesn't come into it, safety is paramount.
Peter
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Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 19:09

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 19:09
Gday Willem,
I know the truckie lovers out there are going to hate this but I think its worth saying.....
You hear a lot of people saying "these blokes are professional drivers"...true...a lot of them are.
But I don't like the Idea of putting my whole families life in the hands of someone you don't know.......there are a lot of beginners out there too, everyone starts from somewhere.
Not to mention the ones pilled out of there brains and dog tired with the attitude of " get out a my way, I'm bigger than you!"
I see lots of road trains really driving to their limits......wouldn't take much to have a serious accident. And so many tourists cruising past them with inches to spare, thinking this truckie is a professional.....he'll miss me.
If only people new how little control you have over that last trailer sometimes.

Just another reason to get right out of the way!

Cheers
Hairy
AnswerID: 354751

Reply By: solo - Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 21:40

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 21:40
30 years ago on the old Stuart hwy( DIRT) I was travellling with my brother in the dust trail of a road train waiting for a change in direction of the road to get some clear air to make a safe overtake. Suddenly another road train appeared out of the dust cloud, parked up, travelling in the opposite direction.
Instinct kicked in and I shouted to my brother to hit the picks. When the dust cleared we were only metres from the back of the roadtrain we were following who had stopped to talk to his mate.
There was only a few metres space betwen the rear of the two RT's which we managed to slip through. Chalk another one up to experience!
AnswerID: 354775

Reply By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Thursday, Mar 19, 2009 at 08:44

Thursday, Mar 19, 2009 at 08:44
I'm will all find some helpful information at this website, and thanks to Willem for the great Pics, he has it all sussed out already.

HEAVY VEHICLE ROAD COURTESY

.
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AnswerID: 354837

Reply By: Member - Julie P (VIC) - Friday, Mar 20, 2009 at 10:48

Friday, Mar 20, 2009 at 10:48
We were lucky coming down the same road in not meeting anything that big - but did on other "development" roads - move over, let them go - you can see them coming with enough warning to get out of their way - but it is amazing how many people think the trucks should give way - they don't seem to realise that a lot of these roads were made for these trucks, and we are privileged enough to be able to use them.
Love that country - nothing to be seen for miles and miles (funny how miles sounds better than "kilometres and kilometres" - just doesn't have the same ring to it.
jules
AnswerID: 355107

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