Snorkel necessary for Cape??

Submitted: Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 21:33
ThreadID: 6698 Views:3155 Replies:8 FollowUps:10
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We have a mate travelling with us to the Cape next week in a V6 Toyota 4 Runner who is thinking of not fitting a snorkel. Would this be a wise move?
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Reply By: Member - Alpaca (SA) - Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 21:38

Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 21:38
Went through the same delema a few months back. Fitted one and headed for the Cape. You don't need one for the water crossings but it will certainly help keep the dust out of the motor. In a petrol motor maybe not so important
have a good trip
ps stick to the telegraph track if you can.BOTH WAYSAlpaca
AnswerID: 28490

Follow Up By: Member - Geoff - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 09:32

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 09:32
Alpaca,Just reading the repsonse below and feel Craig should fit a snorkel, as we thought. Especially at this time of year when a storm can strike in the tropics and lift the streams in no time. Thanks
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Reply By: Kev - (Cairns,QLD) - Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 22:18

Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 22:18
I don't understand why you would do such a trip without one.

It only has to rain the night before upstream to raise the water level wich is obviously totaly unpradictable.

It may be a petrol engine but it still will be an inconveniance to you and others to have to rescue you (especialy if fast flowing) from the crossing and wait for the engine to start again.

Its only a once off cost !
AnswerID: 28499

Follow Up By: Member - Geoff - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 09:38

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 09:38
Kev, I will pass this information on and we feel ourselves it is wise for him to have one fitted, especially now, coming into the wet season. Thanks
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Reply By: Paul - Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 23:02

Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 23:02
This is perhaps a good time to ask a question.

Do snorkels render the whole air intake from the top of the snorkel to the intake manifold waterproof?

If so then how is the existing air filter which presumably the end of the snorkel fits into made waterproof?
Paul
AnswerID: 28510

Follow Up By: 4by - Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 23:17

Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 23:17
The safari snorkel wbsite does a good job at explaing how parts of the snorkel work...
Safari website(don't forget to check out the cool snorkel video they have for download!)
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Follow Up By: Kev - (Cairns,QLD) - Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 23:21

Tuesday, Aug 19, 2003 at 23:21
If done correctly.

I have checked the air intake and all seals for possable problems and then silastic sealed the pipes on, a mate used stickaflex (non removable).

Don't forget most if not all air boxes has a drain hole with a little rubber flap that is suposed to close when engine running (suction) but over time they perish.

No good if you happen to stall the engine during a water crossing so i fitted a small ball valve so i can lock off the drain for crossings but still can have it open for rain water entering the snorkel.

I don't care what anyone says, water does make it to the air filter when driving in rain.......admitedly only a small amount.

This may seem like over kill to you guys but it makes me feel safer !

Kev.
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Reply By: The Moose - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 13:36

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 13:36
The wet season is a long way off yet - certainly not in August/September. That's way too early. I've owned a petrol 80 Series for a few years and do not have a snorkel. I've been through plenty of water including over the bonnet. If one takes the appropriate precautions there is no need for a snorkel. Also regarding dust the snorkel will only be of benefit if not following another vehicle's dust. When a mate and I went to the Cape recently his diesel with snorkel had heaps more dust in the filter than I did. Admittedly he did most of the following and tried his best to keep out of the dust, but it isn't always possible. In any case you can't avoid the dust from vehicles going the opposite way. In short if I was the fellow in the 4 Runner I wouldn't bother with a snorkel. He's better off learning the proper procedures to take in the event that he strikes some deepish water however nless there is a freak storm deep water will not be an issue on the Cape. It's a great trip and as stated above stick to the track both ways - the bypass to be avoided as much as possible.
AnswerID: 28530

Reply By: Eric from Cape York Connections - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 14:56

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 14:56
Geoff as some one else said you can do a good tarp job and if you do get that flash flood its going to be gone in a day or two . Most of the peple on our trips dont have snorkels and we just tarp up . Take a spare air filter or two
All the best
Eric
www.capeyorkconnections.com.au
4wd Tag Along AdventuresCape York Connections
AnswerID: 28534

Reply By: andy - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 15:24

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 15:24
The snorkle is a good Idea for water however there are som cons that come with it that the sales people never tell you.

1. It does let more dust in. My filter is way dirtier now than pre snorkle. Solution is get a pre cleaner air scoop or use a snorkle sock (more dollars).
2. Some cars experience a higher amount of engine noise and body vibration inside the vehicle. I have a current model Hilix and the interior noise has gone up heaps. Have been unable to repair this to date. Is common with current Patrols too and have heard of it on some other cars.
3. May have to move some accessories under the bonnet. Batteries, electronics, compressors etc.

I actually wish that I had never bought the thing as the interior noise and body vibration level rise has driven me mental. Cant hear myself think sometimes.
AnswerID: 28538

Follow Up By: Slammin - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 21:59

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 21:59
Andy let me guess, a diesel?
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Reply By: Kev - (Cairns,QLD) - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 22:03

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 22:03
I can't belive im reading all this !

There are water crossings near Cairns that would be too deep without a snorkel let alone up north, maybe not on the beaten track but you will find them.

To just rely on a tarp is just plain crazy.

A couple of weeks back we crossed a river that had large rocks on the bottom and was not able to travel across in a manner to create a bow wave needed to reduce water in engine bay even with a tarp.

Im blown away that you guys are willing to risk it with just a tarp !
AnswerID: 28573

Follow Up By: Slammin - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 22:58

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 22:58
I agree 100% Kev but the criteria seems to be that people have time to wait it out. Might be a couple of days or so.....
By the way, if it's been as dry as I heard doesn't that mean that you guys are in for a big one?
Also a tarp isn't going to do &*%* all if you stall it. As usual though some people are chancers. They're also usually the ones my recovery equipment gets a workout on because they chanced that as well.
Independence though is a strange and esoteric beast that just doesn't translate for some hence the need for sticking to the main tracks.
To each his own.
BTW the claim that snorkels increase dust intake I find ludicrous and Moose you said it "he did do most of the following and tried to stay out of most of the dust" so doesn't that negate your findings?
From my experience as a solo traveller the snorkel made an absolutely huge difference.
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Follow Up By: Kev - (Cairns,QLD) - Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 23:14

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2003 at 23:14
How many people have the time or patiance to sit by a river and wait for the level to drop while watching others continuing they holiday, especialy if others in there convoy have a snorkel.
Tell me they wont chance it to keep up with the others.

Tripping over large rock can stall the momentem of the bow wave, not just the engine stalling to worry about.

Piece of mind !
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Follow Up By: Eric from Cape York Connections - Thursday, Aug 21, 2003 at 13:13

Thursday, Aug 21, 2003 at 13:13
Kev I wonder what we did before snorkels I cant remember but we had one of those silly tarp things I supose the modern tarp is just no as good as that old tarp we used to use with that good old fashioned preperation.
If the water does get that high and you dont whant to wait and your so called mates buzzed of leaving you there . You didnt think of asking your mate to drag you across we have pulled a few trucks across. That may be to easy also not every one has the money to put a snorkel on for just one trip. Peter has crossed the Jardine well tarped up with the water over the bonnet and no snorkel in a nissan 2.8 . I think I have said enough But the funny thing is i have a snorkel on both my trucks and some times I even use one of those silly tarp things . just one more thing can you be sure your snorkel has been installed properly or the connections have not come loose or broken.
All the best
Eric Cape York Connections
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Follow Up By: Eric from Cape York Connections - Thursday, Aug 21, 2003 at 13:22

Thursday, Aug 21, 2003 at 13:22
Slammin if I stalled it with the water at a reasonble depth I would hesitate starting the thing I would ask someone to tow me out or winch out myself thats if I was on my own.
All the best
EricCape York Connections
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Follow Up By: Kev - (Cairns,QLD) - Thursday, Aug 21, 2003 at 13:32

Thursday, Aug 21, 2003 at 13:32
I never thought of having someone tow you through if the level is too high, still i would hate to rely on others for such a problem that could be easly avoided by having the right gear.
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Reply By: Slammin - Thursday, Aug 21, 2003 at 22:39

Thursday, Aug 21, 2003 at 22:39
Eric I have towed a number of vehicles through high water with a graders or my vehicle and the air filters on some of the vehicles where wet afterwards (BTW worst was on a KIA sportage, intake facing forwards on top of radiator!). As I said independence is something I prefer and is it wise not to have a snorkel?
In regards to stalls in deep water no it's not the de riguer of driver training to restart but if the water is deep and running, by the time you've winched/towed your vehicle it's going to be a couple of hundred meters down stream still upright at best. A restart is something you would never attempt without a snorkel.
Can it be done without a snorkel YES is it wise, I don't think so.
AnswerID: 28666

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