How long will cryovac meat last.

Submitted: Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 14:42
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Afternoon all,
Been to a three different butchers and have been told three different stories that cryovac meat will last from only 1 week to 6 weeks, so how long is it. I know different cuts and cuts without bones last longer. So in your experiences how long does a lump (400g) of red meat last when cryovaced and refrigerated at between 2 and 4 degrees and are there different ways of cryovacing to make it last longer?
Thanks Graeme
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 14:48

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 14:48
Cryovacing works by excluding oxygen, so any air pockets are bad news.
I reccon 6 weeks is closer than 1 week if done well and stored at 2-4 degrees, but maybe somewhere inbetween would be safe.

Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Pyro 1 - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:29

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:29
Thanks Peter,
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Reply By: Member - John and Val W (ACT) - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 14:52

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 14:52
Hi Graeme,

You should get boneless red meat to last at least 4 weeks and probably 6, though I dont think I have ever tried for that long. We freeze our meat before setting out, and also pack the cryovaced packs in plastic containers in the bottom of the fridge. Too much weight on them can cause the cryovac packs to burst, especially if travelling over corrugations! Fish, chicken, sausages etc will not last as long as red meat.

Cheers
J and V
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Follow Up By: Pyro 1 - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:31

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:31
Good idea about the plastic containers i think i will get one for white meat and one for red. Thanks
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Reply By: TrevorDavid- Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:08

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:08
Pyro 1, with your scenario , six weeks no problems at all. Have never tried to make things last longer than that.


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TDB
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Follow Up By: Pyro 1 - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:41

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:41
Thanks
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Reply By: Member -Signman - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:34

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:34
Up to 6 weeks- keep the fridge at or below 4 degrees.
Don't cryovac anything with bones that could pierce the plastic which would spoil the contents...

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Follow Up By: Pyro 1 - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:41

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:41
Thankyou
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:09

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:09
4 degrees isnt ideal for keepig meat more like -1 to 2 degrees

whole sections of meat will last much longer - at least weeks the more its processed/sliced/trimmed the less time it willl last

also plenty of x factors come into play
generally speaking 2-4 weeks for steaks should be fairly conservative. Contrary to belief it isnt only the peircing plastic why stuff with bones wont last as long but gasses within the bones allow spoilage around the bone
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:49

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 15:49
Don't know much about Graeme , but there are different processes some of which last longer.

Think better commercial systems , flush the product with inert gas before vaccuming and these last longer.
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Follow Up By: Member - lyndon K (SA) - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 09:13

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 09:13
Robin is correct.
GOOD, butchers suck out the air then pump in a gas then suck that out. Red meat at 1-2c will keep for 6 weeks no problems.
4c would walmer than i would store mine.
As for chicken, 1 week to 10 days MAX.

Cheers Lyndon

Ps. I will never understand why people freeze their vac packed meat unless ofcourse it is nearing it's used by date.
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Reply By: Member - Willie , Sydney. - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 16:25

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 16:25
Graeme,
Last year I had my rump steak in the van fridge for six weeks, no problem. Not sure what the temp stays at.
Willie.
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Follow Up By: Pyro 1 - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:42

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:42
Thanks Willie
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 16:31

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 16:31
Depends on your SWMBO.
We had some Tbones which SWMBO insisted be tossed out after about 2 weeks because the fat goes green.
Apparently this is common with cryovac meat and does not imply it is off.
But try to convince the SWMBO.
Regards Philip A
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Follow Up By: Pyro 1 - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:43

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:43
Maybe i will get to the meat before she does, thanks
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Reply By: Axel [ the real one ] - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:00

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:00
Have found that different butchers use different cryovac bags , some bags seem to be much thicker/stronger than others , would have to surmise that the thicker bags require a stronger air removal and less air contact = longer product life.
Have kept boneless cuts including boneless/skinless chicken for upto 6 weeks in the fridge section of our 80lt Waeco , nowadays though we generaly freeze the cryovac products first to act as a cold "bank" ,
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Follow Up By: Pyro 1 - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:45

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:45
Cheers Axel, just one thing you said skinless chicken any reason to be skinless? Thanks Again
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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 08:29

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 08:29
Pyro , skinless only because we prefer our chicken breast that way,
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Reply By: David - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:09

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:09
Hi Pyro 1

As an ex Butcher this is my opinion.

We use cryovac meat all the time at home and going away.
White meats, mince and sausages up to 10 days.
red meat up to 10 to 12 weeks.
As long as your fridge stays at about 2 degrees, this works for me.

when red meat is open you will get a smell as soon as the air hit the meat, it also looks a bit greenish. give it a good wipe down with paper towel to get all moisture off then you will notice it turn back to normal color. If you think it has a bit that looks bit off just trim it off.

I always use oyster blade steak as a whole piece then you can roast it, cut it up for steaks to grill, bbq, fry or you can cut it up for a stew or casserole.

Make sure that you use it ASAP after opening, if you need the meat to be put in smaller sizes there are plenty of butcher that do that to your requirements.

I have been doing this for years and had no problems, just make sure that there is no bone in any meat as this will pierce the bag, if you need a leg of lamb etc get the butcher to bone it out for you.

Also place it all in the bottom of the fridge and try not to open fridge for to long as this all helps. We normally have one fridge for meat and the other for drinks.

Hope all this helps

David
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Follow Up By: Member - Fred B (NT) - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:34

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:34
My friend down south was a butcher who did a lot of orders for rural areas where they only recieved supplies once a month. He always removed external moisture and any fat prior to cyrovac. Never had any problems as long as the temp was kept as low as possible. As David said, it will change color when cyrovac'd and again when opened. Once opened... use it.
Hope that helps.
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Follow Up By: Pyro 1 - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:38

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 17:38
Hi David, thanks for that as you are the ex butcher are there different bags and tecniques used for cryovacing? (there just seemed to be a large difference in using tiimes)And will it always get a smell when first opened? Cheers Graeme
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:22

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:22
The dark clolour in the meat is due to the Myglobins being unable to have oxygen to bind with much the same way as haemoglobins do. Without oxygen they become metmyglobin which is the dark purple colour which can even be seen when one steak lays on another for a while.

once exposed to oxygen they should revert back to oxymyglobin - a nice red colour
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Follow Up By: ross - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:22

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:22
Meat packers use different types of bags to satisfy different customers(or their profit margin).
Basically thicker bags are more expensive but are more puncture resistant.
Other types of bags require no shrinkage in hot water,these are more common these days.

The smell is methane gas and it is always present after a few weeks.
If you are not sure ,let the meat sit for ten minutes and sniff test again.

There is a product,I thinks it called Bonegard, that is fitted over exposed bone before vac packing
Its like a thick wax paper impregnated with cotton gauze material.

All red meat should last at least 30 days if kept at the required temp but it will go longer the fresher and colder it is kept.
The age and condition of the animall before slaughter will also affect the shelflife
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Reply By: HappyCamper - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 18:05

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 18:05
G'day Graeme

I've kept a whole cryovaced rump in the fridge for almost 2 years and it was truly, to die for, when cooked!! 'The' most tender piece of beef I've ever eaten. It was 'vacced by the local bulk butcher and I spoke to a friend who's husband was a butcher and she said they regularly keep meat for this length of time. Her suggestion was to rotate the meat every week or so, that way the juices don't drain to the bottom and the top of the meat be dried out when cooked.

Hope this helps?
Bronwyn ;-)
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Reply By: yakodi - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 19:30

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 19:30
The smell is only the blood/fluids in the meat, it usually disperses after a wipe down, then rinse the meat under the tap for a little bit. The smell doesn't mean that the meat is off. According to a family friend also a butcher, Cryo Should last 6-10 weeks in the fridge.
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Reply By: Best Off Road - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 20:27

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 20:27
Graeme,

Cryvaccing and Vacuum sealing are two entirely different things.

Cry uses a sysyem to sterilise the surface bacteria, then vacuum seal. Simple vacuum seailing only prolongs the effect of the existing surface bacteria.

Hence you are getting different advice from butchers.

Cheers,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Member - Warfer (VIC) - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 21:47

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 21:47
Good Point Jimbo you Learned me Something !


Cheers
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:13

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:13
not so Cryovaccing is merely the product name most associated with vacume packing and has beome the accepted name

much the same as referring to a pressure washer as a gurney even though it is made by karcher

or a Biro even though it is made by Bic
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:17

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:17
hence the circled Rafter the name

Cryovac®
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Follow Up By: ross - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:25

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 01:25
x2 Cryovac is only a brand name.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 06:10

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 06:10
The process to do it properly, when I last saw it at FJ Walker Meatworks in Townsville about 1990 was as follows.

The meat is vacuum sealed. Then dipped briefly into a hot bath of water at 80 C to kill to the surface bacteria. Then immediately dipped into an ice bath to chill it.

We owned a Steakhouse Restaurant at the time and in a good coolroom the meat (whole cuts) was good for at least three months. The older it got, the better it got; "Aged Beef".

Cheers,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 08:27

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 08:27
The hot water "bath" and chill was to remove blood and fat ect from the outside of the plastic prior to box packaging and freezing if going to export , nothing to do with the actual Cryovac process.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 08:50

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 08:50
I was taken on a tour by the Plant Manager and he explained it as I described. The cleaning of the bags was probably a bonus.

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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 12:15

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 12:15
Jim ,heat and contact time sufficient to kill non spore forming bacteria will also start to de nature (cook) the surface of the meat
this would cause series physical spoilage of the meat such as give it an incorrect appearence and prevent oxymoglobin forming when it is removed from the bag (basically it wont go a nice redcolour.
it would do nothing to kill spore forming bacteria
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 12:26

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 12:26
Three Points.

1. I saw it happen with my own eyes.
2. It was explained to me by the Plant Manager.
3. I bought and used the meat in my Restaurant.

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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 14:41

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 14:41
not saying I dont believe you Ive seen it myself but its more for getting more disirable shrinkage and cleaning of the bag.

I believe the plant manager may have told you different, they just manage the place they have no food technology training.

I will reiterate becauseit is common sense when you think of it

Pasteurising meat with heat/time significant to have any effect on surface bacterial lode will denatature the surface protein of the meat - it has to if it is to de nature the bacteria.

this will create physical spoilage of the product

but i understad where your coming from in theory to the untrained eye it makes sense

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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 16:40

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 16:40
Have you ever been inside a meat processing plant? No food technology training? Are you serious, these places are like a Hospital.

The training and expertise these blokes have is immense, I've also been through Top Cut in Melbourne.

I've been around the food industry long enough, and had enough training to know that 77 C is the required temp to cook mince to, to make it safe. That is to say meat that has been exposed to air needs 77C to kill the bacteria. Hence the quick dip at 80, which has no effect on the meat.



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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 20:50

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 20:50
im not going to waste any more time on this except to say

- yes as A butcher ive spent a fair bit of time around the processing plants
- as a trained food technologist i can tell you temperature on its own wont kill bacteria
what is needed is time/temperature as in bacteria (and it varys according to type) needs certain times at certain temperatures to kill them and even then the amounts killed corralate as well
a quick dip at 80 would struggle to penatrate the plastic cover
and i will repeat it for you
you yourself say 77c will cook meat (over what time you dont mention)
YOU WILL NEED TO EXPOSE THE MEAT SURFACE TO PARTIAL COOKING TO KILL ANY MEANINGFULL AMOUNT OF BACTERIA

- typical cooks they think they know something about meat
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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 21:38

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 21:38
69 to 79 , Donga Meats [ Wodonga Vic ] MBAB [Brisbane] and Cairns Meat Export Co , all Meat export companies , worked at all 3 , and can state as fact the quick hot water bath after the cryovac is for nought except the removal of blood /fats / hand contamination prior to box packaging , you think the Japanese who were the biggest market at the time for our beef wanted it 1/2 boiled ??? think again.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 21:41

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 21:41
Fair Dinkhum,

You don't have a clue.

Ill informed information is very dangerous.

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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 21:53

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 21:53
sorry but ive backed up my statements with knowledge
youve just goot i reckon and he told me

anyway i couldnt remember the specifics because it is quite complex
but here is the specifics of working out temp/time for killing bacteria

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_death_time

read that then re read your statements about people giving it a "quick dip " and you will relize why i am laughing
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 03:34

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 03:34
and here now the final link in your embarasment
jims embarrasment
the hot water dips you spoke of which like i said are used to provide additional shrinkage

(from above in case you forgot)

GOM wrote
"not saying I dont believe you Ive seen it myself but its more for getting more disirable shrinkage and cleaning of the bag."


I had explained it all clearly to you but instead of learning something new you had to accuse me of
Jim wrote
"Fair Dinkhum,

You don't have a clue.

Ill informed information is very dangerous"


well yes you were correct unfortunatly you spoke only of yourself
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 08:04

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 08:04
This is going around in circles

My original statement

"Cryvaccing and Vacuum sealing are two entirely different things.

Cry uses a sysyem to sterilise the surface bacteria, then vacuum seal. Simple vacuum seailing only prolongs the effect of the existing surface bacteria."


Look Here

There are variuos forms of sterilising, Hot Water still being a recognised method.

Ask yourself why a packet of bacon has a shelf ilfe of 4 months or more. Try buying some bacon, vacuum sealing it and see how long it lasts. The reason commercially produced stuff lasts longer is that it is not JUST vacuum sealed. It is processed in a manner to ensure it is sterile before being vacuum sealed.

That the process may have changed since 1990 is irellevant. The fact remains that cryvaccing is not the same as vacuum sealing.

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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 08:37

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 08:37
Obviously on the red again , as others have stated , the term "cryovac" is simply a registered brand for a machine that does vacume sealing of food products ,it is not a different process ,,, Google vacume sealing food , Google cryovac ,what do you get ?? vacume sealing of food products ,as for comercially sealed products an inert gas is introduced into the process to ensure that ALL oxygen is removed thereby stopping bacterial growth ,in smaller applications [read local butcher /home units] the cost of the equipment to create a full vacume and introduce an inert gas is / would be prohibative , Jim keep off the red.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 08:56

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 08:56
Axel,

You have hust confirmed my point, thankyou.

Cryvaccing is not JUST vacuum sealing. There is more to the process.

Thanks again,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 09:18

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 09:18
You must still be half cut if you think my above reply confirms your point , READ AGAIN , cryovac is simply vacume sealing , your hot water bath ect does nothing to kill /suspend the bacterial growth inside the package , other factors introduced during the sealing process can and do suspend the bacterial growth ,NOT A HOT WATER BATH ,, ,,,,Crovac is a brand name for a VACUME SEALING SYSTEM , not in its self the process .
Lay off the red and you may just learn something instead of proclaiming that a tour thru a meat works 20 yrs ago makes you an expert on meat processing and storage.
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Follow Up By: Member - Warfer (VIC) - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 09:56

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 09:56
To much CSI going on,think i'll stick too me Baked Beens...
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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 12:31

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 12:31
Hey Warfer ,do you mean baked beans or HEINZ baked beans ,
vacume sealed meat or Cryovac ,, ,,,one and the same, LOL ;)
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 14:43

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 14:43
Im not believing this, you must have notgonefa at schoolseeing as you cant learn anything

after all that you still havntgot it through your head that
cryovac is a registered brand name of a divison of Sealed Air
and covers bags, vacume machines and shrink tunnels.

You should have read your own link as it says no where about a quick dip for packaged primals. Hot water pasterization it mentions are used on whole carcasses and used temps and time combined with pressure all with direct contact - No where does it mention a quick dip in warm water after packaging.

Iveeven gien you a link to the shrink tunnels you saw being used which showed what they do
----------- and yet nothing has sunk into you?

and yourclaim that bacon you do yourself wont last long if you pack it yourself

again just wrong (depending on the handling of it post production). I made smoked fish myself in about the same way as bacon is made packaged it myself and it lasted alot longer than 1 month, and that was conduction microbiological swabs - not just some cooks opinion.

It was part of a project I was doing and I gave up after 6 months of testing as it just wasnt spoiling. The last peice of vaccume packed smoked fish was eaten about 12 months later - still fine
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Follow Up By: Member - Warfer (VIC) - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 15:01

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 15:01
See what you bloody done now Axel,I just peed my bloody pants in laughter !


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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 16:24

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 16:24
"Im not believing this, you must have notgonefa at schoolseeing as you cant learn anything"

As I recall, by about the end of grade four I had mastered basic spelling, punctuation and grammar.

I also remember a little saying concerning pots and kettles.

HAHAHAHA


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Follow Up By: Member - Warfer (VIC) - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 16:40

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 16:40
Jimbo youve just left yourself open to check every word in a centance ~(*--) that you write in future...Goodluck mate lmao...




Cheers
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 20:33

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 20:33
yes thanks Jimbo I was actually typing it on my laptop keyboard which i dont get on with while laying on the floor next to the door because thats where i get wireless reception

should actually have read

you must not got alot out of school seeing as you cant learn anything

no actual reflection on my schooling unlike your un educated posting on a subject you have no knowledge of.

Im blown away that youve made such a goose of yourself.



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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 21:21

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 21:21
And now, in a state of sobriety and and a preferred physical position, you are still unable to to use a capital to start a sentence.

You are still unable to finish a sentence with a Full Stop.

You still do not know that Im should be I'm.

You cannot comperhend that youve actually means "you have" and is properly put as you've.

Do you really expect anyone to take you seriously?

Don't ever call my education into question.

You're (that is "you are" properly put) ill educated. Try to improve.

I wish you well and good luck with your endeavours.

Regards,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 21:30

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 21:30
Obviosly you have accepted you were completely wrong
.
and instead of accepting that and moving on your attempting other ways to denigrate me.

Why dont you read this exchange from the top?
I politly corrected the factual innacuracies of your posts. When you continued to try and assert your innacurcies I reconfirmed using actual scientific reasons why they were innacurate. others with additional personal experience re inforced this to you.

It was only when it still wasnt sinking in to you and for whatever tiny reason you may have had wouldnt accept it the post turned to crap

I really hope you have learnt something about yourself today and can start steps to correct it
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 21:47

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 21:47
Dull, very dull.

And, Professor, you still need to learn how to spell and us a Full Stop.

You called my education into account, bad mistake.

Your (thats not you're) credibility is shot.

HAHAHA

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Thursday, Mar 26, 2009 at 09:21

Thursday, Mar 26, 2009 at 09:21
get outmore , just goes to show that a formal education makes certain people think they are an expert in ALL things and never ever have to admit that they are wrong , gets on the red you see ,does his usual false information and then when proven wrong resorts to character assassination , don't fret it ,
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Reply By: Holden4th - Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 21:32

Monday, Mar 23, 2009 at 21:32
Last September I bought two pieces of bulk cryovaced meat from a local wholesale cheapo butcher (Patton's, GC) with the idea of testing out a theory from another butcher who usually produces superb meat. "In the cryovac you can keep some bulk meat up to 200 days".

One was a thin rib fillet (supposedly export) and the other was a whole sirloin.

2 weeks ago I removed both from the fridge and carved them into steaks. The rib fillet had just gone past its usefuleating date and while it was still edible, removing the ammonia smell took too much time for me to be happy. This was quite a thin piece of meat and did not hold up well. I also had concerns about the way it was packed but at $17 I wasn't too concerned. I'll buy this in future but reduce the fridge time.

The sirloin was another story. The beautiful dark colour, no smell, outer fat lookingand smelling OK and 5 months plus of 'hanging', I knew this was going to be great! Once carved I grilled one and it was just brilliant. The rest I have vac packed (using my own machine) and frozen. I got it for $40 reduced from $80 but technically it was still a budget cut of meat. I'll do this again. Hanging any big cut of beef, regardless of quality, will definitely improve its tenderness and flavour.

Finally, usng my own vac packer, I've had rump steak in the fridge for two months and it's come out very well. I reckon I could have doubled the time it was in there.
AnswerID: 355769

Reply By: aka - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 08:42

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 08:42
Went to W.A for 3 months last year kept the meat in cryovac at
-2 ate the last of at Renmark on way home if done properly it will last
AnswerID: 355823

Reply By: Member - Warfer (VIC) - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 16:49

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 16:49
Does marinating the meat before cryovac buy you anymore time ????


Cheers
AnswerID: 355902

Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 14:45

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 14:45
yes a proper marinade contains viniger and salt both of which will act as an additional preservative
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Reply By:- Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 20:48

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2009 at 20:48
Hi Pyro
all this depends on whether the rump etc. that you are slicing and cryovacing into meal sized portions is fresh or whether the rump etc. has previously been cryovaced. You can not cryovac meat that is about to expire and then expect it to last as long as meat that has been hung and then sliced and immediately.
So i would take the advise of the butcher as he knows how long the meat will last because they know the history of it prior to cryovacing, and as others have pointed out chicken does not probably last longer than a week, and as also pointed out the thinner the slices are less time it will last.
I think cryovacing is great as you don't have to run the fridge above beer temp and the meat will keep for enough time to (2 weeks MAX etc once sliced for red meat and a week MAX for chicken) get to the next butcher for the next supply, if this does not work you can always cryovac the meat then freeze it put it in the bottom of the fridge then put news paper on top of it and run it at beer temp and you will find the meat will stay frozen for quite a few days and as it is cyovaced you still have the window at fridge temp.
I do not think 400g pieces of meat will last not more than 2 weeks and still be good to eat(IF NOT PREVIOUSLY CYOVACED AS A WHOLE RUMP)if it has been cyovaced prior to being sliced i would find another butcher, i appologise for all the rest of the explanation just my experiences from our camping trips.
If a butcher told me that it would last beyond 2 weeks i would find another butcher or go back to the one that said 1 week at least he or she is being realistic.

MATTIE

AnswerID: 355947

Reply By: meandet - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 10:12

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 10:12
G,day Graeme
We get our meat (boneless) cryovac packed in Broome before spending a month at Cape Leveque. It is stored in our 40 litre Engel at about 3 degrees and have found it's still ok on the trip home.
Cheers
Peter
AnswerID: 356060

Reply By: Member - Willie , Sydney. - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 16:48

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 16:48
Ground Hog Day. This post keeps coming back !
AnswerID: 356126

Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Sydney. - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 16:51

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2009 at 16:51
Now its gone back to page 3 again. A minute ago it was on page 1 amid the posts from March 25.

0
FollowupID: 624137

Reply By: noelvac - Saturday, Mar 28, 2009 at 11:14

Saturday, Mar 28, 2009 at 11:14
if anyone is interested in doing their own packing, I got a good machine from www.thepackagingcentre.com.au .. works out pretty cheap to pack, I think an average size bag for this machine is about 14c
AnswerID: 356713

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