Why do they put "UP" on the end of everything

Submitted: Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 14:52
ThreadID: 67484 Views:3562 Replies:13 FollowUps:17
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This has had me wondering for a while, I've asked a few WA natives with no meaningful answer.

So, why do place names in WA end in "up"

Is it a more formalised version of the Qld "eeeihhh" at the end of a sentence or were they just bored when they named places.

I'll be interested what the collective wisdom here comes up with.
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Reply By: Member - Broe (WA) - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 14:59

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 14:59
From what I have been told by a couple of natives is that it means a place of water. So therefore, any place name that ends in "up" means that before settlement, the natives had a traditional well there, or a soak, creek etc etc.

Note that it only applies to a couple of dialects.


Broe
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Follow Up By: Baz&Pud (Tassie) - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:03

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:03
Hi Guys,
When we were in WA last year, we asked the same question of quite a few people and we were given the same answer, means being near water.
Cheers.
Bas
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Reply By: stumbly - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:11

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:11
yep, got the same explanation years ago. I think its from the nyoongar dialect (my apologies if this is wrong) from the southern part of WA meaning place of water.
If you look at place names in the midwest to northern parts of the state the "up" isn't on many, so I imagine a different dialect?
Perhaps any one of Aboriginal heritage on the forum could enlighten us?
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Reply By: ExplorOz - David & Michelle - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:32

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:32
Yes I concur - that's the reason.
MM
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Reply By: GoneTroppo Member (FNQ) - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:36

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:36
Good to get agreement on something for once, not often that happens around here :-)

Thanks for the enlightenment.

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Reply By: Member - Howard T (QLD) - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:38

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 15:38
Think you will find "eeeihh" belongs to North Queensland vocabulary as with "ya know".
Being a North Queensland transferred to Central Queensland a long time ago it took me quite a while to understand what language CQ ers were speaking.

lol
Cheers

Howard.
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Follow Up By: Member - Malcolm (Townsville) - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 17:30

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 17:30
eeeih Howard

I came north (from SA in '81) and now speak real good ya know. LOL

Malcolm
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Reply By: Louie the fly (SA) - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 18:22

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 18:22
I just googled it and found that it may also mean "place". So, as mentioned earlier, it may depend on the dialect.

Interestingly, I found that in Canada they refer to their indigenous people as aboriginals. No relevance, just interesting.

I thought Qld'ers put "but" at the end of a sentence. Or is that someone else?

Louie
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 23:14

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 23:14
Aboriginal is not necessarily pertaining to Australia, it means first known in an area or region.
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Follow Up By: GoneTroppo Member (FNQ) - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 08:09

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 08:09
Louie that's the kiwis
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Follow Up By: Member - Russnic [NZ] - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 08:35

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 08:35
You got that wrong, GoneTroppo.
If they are from the North Island every sentence finishes with"eh"
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Follow Up By: Member - Fred G NSW - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 09:44

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 09:44
And in the South Island every sentence begins with "eh?" :-)))
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Follow Up By: Member - Russnic [NZ] - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 10:03

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 10:03
Have you been there done that.
I would guess not.
I find your country as in COUNTRY fascinating ,that is why I keep going back.
Not that I enjoy the towns.Best Avoided.
Every one that has worked with stock knows ( bleep Happens) you do end up with some on the boots. Scrape it off, move on.
But must be a town word, eh?
Cheers
Russ
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Follow Up By: Member - Fred G NSW - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 13:57

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 13:57
Hey Russ, I have been there several times and absolutely love the place, aye. Have done both Islands and also visited by sea whilst serving in the Grey Funnel Line, aye. Loved the dark beer they used to sell in goony size bottles, similar to Darwin stubbies, was a sin to drink it cold :-) aye.
First time I went to Auckland it seemed we had arrived during a Vintage Car Festival, aye, but soon realised that they were what all the locals drove, aye. LOL LOL.
Cheers from Fred.
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Follow Up By: stumbly - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 14:44

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 14:44
sounds choice aye?
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Reply By: Member - Fred G NSW - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 18:35

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 18:35
Looking forward to visiting many of the "-ups" when we get over there next July. Will be a 45 year Navy reunion.
Main area we plan to visit is the South west and back via Esperence, after all the reunion festivities conclude in Peth, Fremantle and Rockingham, so we should get to see a few "-ups."
Eagerly keeping an eye on all related topics for that area, and any suggestions most welcome.
Fred & Chris.
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Follow Up By: stumbly - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 00:51

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 00:51
Navy reunion? imagine there will be a few "bottoms up!"
Lol, I meant with ya tot of rum for those with dirty minds!
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Follow Up By: Member - Fred G NSW - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 14:00

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 14:00
hahahahahahahahahahahaha I knew that's what ya meant LOL
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Reply By: westskip - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 20:12

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 20:12
You are quite correct that "up" means water or place in the dialect for the South West. Once you get into the wheatbelt you will find numerous towns ending in 'in' or 'ing' with a similar meaning.

John
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Follow Up By: Member - andrew B (Kununurra - - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 23:39

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 23:39
Gday John, in or ing may mean place of no water in the wheatbelt...woluld LOL if it didn't affect people so badly......
Cheers andrew
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Reply By: Neil & Pauline - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 20:39

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 20:39
Actually the "up" means place. in other dialects it is "oo" or "in"(also translated to "ing").
Kojonup means the place of the Koja which is a stone axe.
I have been trying to find a book that gives the the meanings of all the names.

Most of the places with the "up" etc are associated with water supplies hence the confusion with the meaning.

hope that helps.


Neil
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 13:19

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 13:19
Neil,

I have "Every Name Tells a Story" by Stephen Yarrow and Lesley Batchelor.

It has the meanings of most of WA town names.

Cheers
Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.

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Follow Up By: Maîneÿ [wa] - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 10:35

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 10:35
Neil,
These are just some places with"up" in the name, all are with-in 100 klm of home:

Jalbarragup, Nannup, Cundinup, Coomalbidgup, Kronkup, Narrikup
Takalarup, Amelup, Lake Toolbrunup, Jackitup, Catmeticup, Boyup brook, Yallingup, Boyanup, Manjimup, Moodiarrup, Jingalup, Myalup, Meelup, Wedgecarrup

What can you tell me about Meelup & Myalup, other than they are by the ocean ?

Mainey . . .

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Follow Up By: Neil & Pauline - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 11:15

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 11:15
When I get the book I will be able to tell you. I know Manjimup is a place of reeds.

Neil
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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:19

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:19
Unfortunately the book doesn't have either of these towns.

Try this link Here.

It has Myalup listed but not Meelup.

Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.

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Reply By: Member - Lionel A (WA) - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 23:03

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 23:03
Cant say I noticed that until you mentioned it.

Most places I visit seem to end in Tavern, Inn, Hotel or Club.

Its pretty much the same through out the State.....lol.



Cheers.....Lionel.
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Reply By: Motherhen - Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 23:38

Friday, Apr 03, 2009 at 23:38
I believe that water is a loose associated meaning. UPP (original spellings of a number of these places had two Ps) means camping place - which by necessity was usually near water.

Motherhen
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Reply By: Boobook2 - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 09:34

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 09:34
OT
When European explorers first saw these strange hopping animals they asked an aborigine what they were called. He replied "kangaroo" meaning "I don't understand" your question. The explorers thought this was the animal's name. And that's how the kangaroo got its name.
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Reply By: GoneTroppo Member (FNQ) - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 12:59

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 12:59
Ok I can believe all the Water, camp stuff. Makes sense.

What I'm curious about is that nowhere else do you get such a concentration of similar names.

Take any area and there must have been an aboriginal word for Water or camp. How come it did not make it into the place names for that region to the same extent as the up's?
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Follow Up By: Member - Rotord - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 14:14

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 14:14
Might have been preference on the part of the first surveyor .
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