Rusty Springs

Submitted: Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:15
ThreadID: 67944 Views:2143 Replies:7 FollowUps:6
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My specialist 4WD repair workshop has brought my attention to the rust between leaves of the rear springs of the Troopy. Leaf separation is evident. He warns of likely leaf breakage at any time particularly as a result of driving on corrugations.

The only resolution offered is spring replacement together with shackles, bushes etc at an all-up cost over $800.

Now the gamble....do I replace them now or take the chance of breakage in a remote location.

Any thoughts or comments ???

Cheers
Allan
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - William H (WA) - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:29

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:29
Good afternoon Allan.

Today im changing the springs in the Toyota, in the front, and i did the rear last week, what i did was pull the springs appart and cleaned them, and then repainted them with black paint with Kill rust in the paint, helps to slow down the rust when it starts, then put them back together with a new centre pin, in the springs, new bushes, and a grease on every moving part,

Cheers for now...William H...Bunbury...WA.
AnswerID: 360015

Reply By: trainslux - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:32

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:32
If they have surface rust on them, and they are holding a good curve, and are not wearing into each other beyond a few mm's, then keep the damn things on there.

If there sagged, each leaf has worn into the one above it an obvious step, and there badly rusted and look like a fishing trailer, then replace them.

When were they fitted?? or are they original fitment?

Trains
AnswerID: 360016

Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 17:36

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 17:36
I have only recently purchased the vehicle but documents provided show new springs fitted September 2007.

I have just made a close inspection of the springs and there is no apparent wear, they are not sagging and most importantly, I can now see that it is NOT rust forcing the leaves apart.

They are of course clamped tightly together at the U-bolts and are touching the leaf above at each tip. I can see light through between each leaf along the length between the axle and the tips...the natural curve of each leaf. So there does not appear to be rust forcing them apart.

Of course there is surface rust but not thick or flaking.

Suddenly I am feeling much better!

Hooray
Allan
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Allan

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Follow Up By: trainslux - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 18:32

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 18:32
Very surprised that you were told to replace them.

Most leaf packs have either grease/ graphite paint on them to help with the noise, and comfort of the spring in its operation, often, and as mentioned already, you can take the spring pack apart, and grease them.
If there noisy, most often after driving in the wet, hit them with some lanotec grease in a can, it penetrates the pack better, and lubricates better than crc, rp7 etc.
Or just wipe on some excess moly grease from when you do the unis.

Older landies had leather, or canvas covers over each spring pack.
Was tempted to do the same to my lux when I fitted new springs.

My old springs in the back were sagged flat, had worn into each other over 4mm in some, the main carrier spring was inverted the wrong way, and we loaded up the lux, and travelled some pretty bad tracks, mates older one was even worse.

In saying that I would not reccomened that you do that, or anyone else, in hindsight we should have replaced them before.
If there only a few years old, I would be very hesitant to replace them unless an obvious fault has occoured, ie cracked, or broken spring in the pack.

Is this a reputable shop you know well?

economic down turn and all, he could be correct in stating there is a fault, but it sounds a bit odd at such new springs.

Trains

Ps, can you post any pics of the "damaged" pack??
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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 11:44

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 11:44
Hi Trains,

Yes, it is a reputable 4WD repair workshop. Long standing and well-known. That is what worries me. They have loads of experience and should know what they are talking about. And I don't think they are desperate for work!

Anyway here are some photos that may be useful.

Cheers
Allan
Image Could Not Be Found
Image Could Not Be Found
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Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Shaker - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:37

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:37
"Leaf separation is evident" ..... Replace them!
AnswerID: 360019

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 23:09

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 23:09
Shaker,
What is "leaf separation"? I haven't heard of it before.

Cheers
Phil
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FollowupID: 627966

Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 23:49

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 23:49
It is when the rust between the leaves starts to push them apart, it can also cause the rebound clips to open up.
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FollowupID: 627969

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 09:18

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 09:18
Thanks for that. I find it hard to believe than any leaf springs would be like that in a couple of years.
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FollowupID: 627986

Reply By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:43

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 16:43
Do you know if it has been used to launch boats (into sea water) or done much beach work ?

As in a previous reply, if it's only surface rust I doubt you will have any future problems. If the rust is actually forcing the leaves apart then you will have to bite the bullet.

.
AnswerID: 360021

Reply By: Moose - Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 20:28

Friday, Apr 17, 2009 at 20:28
G'day Allan
Get a second professional opinion. This guy may just be trying to boost sales. Go to a specialist spring place and see what they say. No-one on here can actually see what they are like so you can't rely on responses. Wrong choice could have serious consequences later.
Cheers from the Moose
AnswerID: 360058

Reply By: Rockape - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 14:23

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 14:23
Allen,
here are some photo's of my Troopcarrier rear spring, these springs are around 15yrs old.

The spring doesn't seem much different to yours, your spring just seems to have more gap between the leaves.Image Could Not Be Found Image Could Not Be Found
AnswerID: 360155

Reply By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Monday, Apr 20, 2009 at 16:11

Monday, Apr 20, 2009 at 16:11
Thanks guys for your views and comments.

I'm sure now that the leaf separation is produced by the "set" of the springs and not by rust forcing them apart. Get in the right position and you can see through the gaps. They are not blocked by rust.

However, there is some surface rust on the exposed edges and surfaces of the leaves and so I have sprayed a rust-converter solution based on phosphoric acid on them and through the leaf gaps. When that is dry I will overpaint with X-troll which also treats rust and leaves a varnish-like coating.

Once again, thanks for the help.

Cheers
Allan
Cheers
Allan

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AnswerID: 360544

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