HOw to repair a radiator ( nissan Patrol)

Submitted: Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 11:57
ThreadID: 67968 Views:4112 Replies:11 FollowUps:7
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Greetings guys --- i have a small pinhole - well a few actually in the Nissan Patrols radiator - its in 1 core and looks like something has rubbed on it ..... core appears to be aluminum

now replacement cost is $700+ can this be fixed at home? just tried with my blow torch and solder but would not take

any experts care to suggest an approach ?

Nissan Patrol 4.2 TDI

Boc
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Reply By: troopyman - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 12:20

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 12:20
I dont mean to be sceptical but it sounds like the coolant has reacted with the aluminium from either mixed coolants or not flushing out properly or leaving too long between flushing and replacing . Replace with an aftermarket brass one . Should cost about $600 fitted . Have the coolant power flushed out and replaced by a reputable radiator place every 12 months .
AnswerID: 360140

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Apr 19, 2009 at 07:41

Sunday, Apr 19, 2009 at 07:41
Troopyman,
The aftermarket brass ones are not as efficient as the aluminium ones and on a 4.2 Patrol, this may be a problem.
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FollowupID: 628108

Reply By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 12:37

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 12:37
Ozboc

this stuff works a treat,used it for your exact reason in one of my racecars.

Knead it
AnswerID: 360144

Reply By: Member - Chris & Debbie (QLD) - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 12:44

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 12:44
Boc

As a patch you can use silicone sealant, which I have used succefully many times. Just remove the fins on either side of the damaged tube clean it up with some sand paper and fill either side of the damaged tube with silicone plus a layer of a few millimetres thick over the top of the hole. Allow plenty of time to cure.
How long this lasts depends on the condition of your radiator of cause.

Chris
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AnswerID: 360145

Reply By: Roughasguts - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 13:38

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 13:38
Araldite is really good as well.
Mix some alloy fillings in the mix and you can use it to patch broken Alloy casings on M/cycles, good stuff for that.

Then again that's what kneed it does now, but 35 years ago it wasn't around.

Cheers
AnswerID: 360150

Reply By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 13:46

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 13:46
Everybody knows that something like a radiator only gives trouble at midnight during a heavy rainstorm on the coldest night of the year and at least 100 km from the nearest assistance. Or, in the outside lane at rush hour on the busiest motorway. :-))

If one tube is corroded then the rest are also corroded. Better get it replaced as soon as possible.

.
AnswerID: 360151

Follow Up By: mowing - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 13:53

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 13:53
Totally agree, fix the problems you know about properly and that then only leaves the ones you don't know about!!

Mark
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FollowupID: 628026

Follow Up By: anglepole - Sunday, Apr 19, 2009 at 09:49

Sunday, Apr 19, 2009 at 09:49
Yes I also agree, replace the thing. You don't want to be looking for a fix kilometres from any where. Towing is very very expensive in the bush.

By the way, aluminum alloy cannot be repaired using normal solder. It requires special solder and a fair bit of know how to do a successful job. Don't waste your time!
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FollowupID: 628121

Reply By: Willem - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 13:53

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 13:53
Boc

I have just replaced mine again after 2.5 years. Think the coolant mix was too strong. You should find one for around $450 -$500 as that is what I paid for mine freight included. Had to drive 40km to collect it.

Cheers
AnswerID: 360152

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Thoughtfully- Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 20:43

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 20:43
Geez Willem, thats getting a bit regular, I remember last time. WHat caused the demise this time, not stray currents again?
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Follow Up By: Willem - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 21:04

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 21:04
??? No you getting things mixed up as usual. Original radiator replaced 2.7 years ago and that one replaced about two months ago. Coolant ate it. Will be more careful with the coolant mex next this time around
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FollowupID: 628076

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Thoughtfully- Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 21:06

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 21:06
was that only two months ago, oh my
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Reply By: Nebster - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 15:05

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 15:05
Hi

I have heard of some people using a heat torch and a zip tie as a quickfix to get themselves out of trouble.

Melt the ziptie over the hole.

Cheers


AnswerID: 360162

Reply By: Ozboc - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 15:13

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 15:13
Greetings guys and thanks for your reply - I have fixed it - that being a temporary fix till i get a new radiator in the next week or 2

Not sure why troopyman would say its a chemical reaction when i said it looked like something had been rubbing on it .... and on closer inspection i actually found the radiator cowling has an arm that extends out - somewhat like a support and its directly where the rub marks were .....

all i done to fix was the following --- knocked out the small fins about 1 inch up and down ( in total) of the worn through rub mark - just crimped the core over and crimped it with bull nose pliers --- manual says it reaches pressure of 14 psi ... so pressure tested to 16 PSI -- holds pressure with no leaks ....

this will be good till i source a new one at a decent price --- the 2 places i called quoted $750+ now have some breathing space to shop around and save a few hundred$$

Boc
AnswerID: 360164

Follow Up By: trainslux - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 22:11

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 22:11
For a bush fix, that is probably the best way to go with limited tools, if you can get to the hole.

If you have some solder, just apply some vinegar (acid) to pickle the exposed core, and heat sparingly with one of those butane torches just a bit larger than a pen, most auto shops have them for under 10 bucks, and are easily refilled by those butane cans for refilling lighters etc.

Quick, and good till you get to where you can replace the core if needed.

When you drop past the rad place, ask for some solder, they usually have heaps of short pieces that they would most likely part with without too much fuss.

A radiator chap put me onto those butane torches, he uses them for the small, patch up work instead of his oxy gear.

Trains

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FollowupID: 628088

Reply By: warthog1 - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 15:15

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 15:15
The fan shroud rubbed a hole in my aluminium core and I had it fixed by a radiator specialist. The spot where it was fixed I then covered in sikaflex about the size of a 50 cent piece to stop the fan shroud rubbing through it again. Dodgy std setup with the fan shroud which caused the leak in the first place (there are 2 spots where the fan shround contacts the core on my '00 model). There is also a copper core available aftermarket that fitted my non intercooled td42t. This has a closer pitch (spacing) on the vertical water galleries. I had this fitted later after the temp climbed when towing. Was about $800 4 or 5 years ago.
AnswerID: 360165

Reply By: Member - Col G (WA) - Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 17:41

Saturday, Apr 18, 2009 at 17:41
A new radiator is the ideal fix, however is cost is a determining factor and when it. This could work and would in my opinion be a more permanent fix than silicon or araldite

A product called Fasmetal made by a US manufacturer called Devcon do the trick, it is used in the HVAC industry (Air Con) to repair evaporators.

Not cheap its a two pack epoxy similar to araldite but looks like aluminium weld when it cures. From memory about $30 last time I bought some. Will withstand pressure when cured.

You might have to check the specifications to see if it can withstand the of a radiator as it is used usually in a cold environment.

Might be worth further investigation.

Cheers

Col
AnswerID: 360191

Reply By: Bom-ba - Sunday, Apr 19, 2009 at 14:10

Sunday, Apr 19, 2009 at 14:10
Hello all, I'm new to EO but a long time fan & reader.
I always keep one of the small plastic dispensers of Black Pepper you can buy at the supermarket in my 4x4's. it works a treat for plugging up pin holes in an emergency and all you (or your radiator repair guy) has to do is flush the system as normal when it gets fixed.
AnswerID: 360337

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