Sunday History Photo/Au

Submitted: Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 04:07
ThreadID: 68219 Views:3361 Replies:2 FollowUps:8
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Being Anzac Day yesterday I thought it appropriate to remember our fallen Men and Women for this Sunday ,
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During the Second World War, Adelaide River was the headquarters of a large base and the Adelaide River War Cemetery was created especially for the burial of servicemen and women who died in this part of Australia. It was used by Australian General Hospitals 101, 107, 119, 121 and 129.
After the war, the Army Graves Service moved graves from civil cemeteries, isolated sites and temporary military burial grounds, into the Adelaide River War Cemetery. These included Bagot Hospital Cemetery, Berrimah Hospital and War Cemetery, Daly Waters Civil Cemetery, Darwin Public Cemetery, Gove War Cemetery, Hughes Cemetery in Darwin, Katherine Civil and War Cemeteries, Larrimah War Cemetery,
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Milingimbi War Cemetery, Mt Isa War Cemetery in Queensland, where No 74 Camp Hospital once operated, South Goulburn Island Mission Cemetery and Truscott War Cemetery.
Adelaide River War Cemetery was taken over by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in September 1947 and under a formal agreement with the Australian Government, is maintained by staff of the Office of Australian War Graves. The War
Cemetery adjoins the Adelaide River Civil Cemetery, in which are buried 63 civilians, including nine Post Office workers who were killed on 19 February 1942, as a result of a direct hit on the Post Office by Japanese bombs. Thirty-one Aboriginal people are among the dead who lie in that part of the cemetery. The War Cemetery is situated in savannah
country about 1km from the Stuart Highway, along a short bitumen road, which runs parallel to, and 100 metres from, the Adelaide River.
There are 434 burials, comprising 14 airmen of the Royal Air Force, 12 unidentified men of the British Merchant Navy, one soldier of the Canadian Army, 18 sailors, 181 soldiers and 201 airmen belonging to the Australian forces, and seven men of the Australian Merchant Navy.
The Adelaide River War Cemetery was entered in the Register of the National Estate in 1984.
The Northern Territory Memorial to the Missing is one of several erected around the world for those who have no known grave. This Memorial was erected especially to commemorate those of the Australian Army, the Royal Australian Air Force and the Australian Merchant Navy who lost their lives in the South West Pacific region during the Second World War.
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The total number honoured on the Memorial is 292, of whom 102 belong to the Australian Army,
164 to the Royal Australian Air Force and 26 to the Australian Merchant Navy. Included in the figure for the Army is a sister of the Australian Army Nursing Service.
The Memorial is placed centrally in the cemetery, between the entrance building and the Cross ofSacrifice, which is towards the rear boundary fence.

Because Anzac began in WWI I thought something about John Simpson , the Soldier and the Donkey would be worth a mention,
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Reply By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 07:08

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 07:08
Does anyone know where Simpson came from / was born ?

Thanks KK
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Follow Up By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 07:24

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 07:24
KK
He was a Pommie

Read his Biography from the Aust War Memorial

Cheers Kev
Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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Follow Up By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 07:43

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 07:43
Thanks Kev,
As a New Zealander I was brought up with ANZAC tales that usually mentioned Simpson and of course the paintings and statues are common. I can forgive him being a Pom but if I think of the 'ANZAC spirit' I think of people like 'Simpson'.

.
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Follow Up By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 07:58

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 07:58
KK,

I think a vast majority of the Australians who fought were Poms. Thank goodness they did.

Cheers Kev
Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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Follow Up By: Member - DAZA (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 08:49

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 08:49
G/Day Kev

My Grand Father was a Pom, he and my Grand Mother were only in Australia 2 months when WW1 broke out, he inlisted in the Light Horse in a little town called Anake in QLD, and left his wife and a one year old daughter for Four and a bit years, she had to run a grocery store by her self, they had just purchased it, she was tough as he was, yep nothing wrong with Poms.
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Follow Up By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 08:59

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 08:59
Daza,

Both my parents are Poms, so I am not complaining ;)

Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 09:15

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 09:15
He was born at a little town called Tyne Dock and lived at 14 Bertram St South Shields .as a follow on to Kevs Post, His civillian trade was a Ships Fireman, My thoughts were his pay was not much to go and get killed for, An ANZAC Medallion was sent to his Sister Mrs A.S.Pearson nee Kirkpatrick in England.

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Follow Up By: Member - Fred B (NT) - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 11:30

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 11:30
Hi Doug,
did you see Fridays NT News? It has a centre piece with number of stories, all connected to people who lived in, served in, or have rellies in the NT. If you haven't seen it, I can send you my copy. Its too big to post here. Hava great week everyone.
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 13:27

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 13:27
Fred
Yes I did see it, I read the paper on line.

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Reply By: Member - Ruth D (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 15:32

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 15:32
Doug, thanks for the interesting history lesson - well researched as usual. Most interesting on Simpson.
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