Tyre Pressure for Sand/Gibber driving

Submitted: Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 09:56
ThreadID: 68810 Views:4446 Replies:9 FollowUps:6
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Ok for sand driving we lower the tyre pressure.
For gibber/rocky terrain should the pressure be lowered or increased.
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Reply By: Member - Daniel M (QLD) - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 10:23

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 10:23
Fireflash


Are you talking the likes of blue metal gravel, corrugated, Pot holed road travel or hardcore low range rock climbing?...:)
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Follow Up By: Willem - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 13:16

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 13:16
No, he is talking Gibber(ish).....LOL


Gibber = Red/brown rocks strewn across the desert landscapes some millions of years ago as a result of volcanic activity. Some rocks are small but some no bigger than a fist.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 22:37

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 22:37
Bro, I read differering origins of gibber, including some volcanic.
Cheers,
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Reply By: Member - ross m (WA) - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 10:36

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 10:36
They should be deflated so the tyre can wrap around a rock ,rather than get holed.
How much deflation?
Not as much as sand,probably around 15 psi less than road pressure,but its really trial and error.
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 10:37

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 10:37
Always lowered - with corresponding decrease in speed.
Robin Miller

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Reply By: Off-track - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 13:26

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 13:26
Retain the same pressure, lower speed.

In the end it's a personal choice with those that swear by their own methods. I have yet to see hard evidence to support high or low pressures but I have used 40-42 psi on thousands of km of dirt and rock with no punctures. That works for me and the tyres I use.
AnswerID: 364823

Follow Up By: travelguy62 - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 17:06

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 17:06
Gday Off-track,
I with you on this one,I too have done thousands of km,s on rough roads with no puctures at these pressures with good quality tyres.I dont know were letting tyres down for rough roads comes from.I would like to here from someone who runs lower pressures for thousands of km,s without having flat tyres .
Cheers Guy
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 21:33

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 21:33
Hi Guy

Like most others here I have done many many miles on rough roads - including at least a dozen birdsville runs and I am one who has not had any flats , whereas most of those I travel with who have not lowered there pressures have had - and usually they don't lower speeds as well.

It comes from this explanation , when you travel on stony roads , at any given time there is less of the tyre contact patch in contact with road material (because it is uneven).
The vehicle still weighs the same , so by definition you have higher point pressure on the rubber that makes contact.

This leads to fractures and chipping.

With good tyres you will get away with this longer - but you could also do better.
Robin Miller

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Reply By: Member - Redbakk (WA) - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 13:35

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 13:35
Lower the tyre pressure and with it lower your speed.....usually lower for sand and beaches...not so much for gibbers.
AnswerID: 364825

Reply By: Member - Duncs - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 14:19

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 14:19
Typically on gibbers I would lower my tyre pressure by about 25% from road pressures. For me that would mean about 30psi on the gibber.

When I go onto the soft sand I would drop again by about 25% as a starting point. So about 22psi but if that was too hard I would drop again and again until it felt right. Usually about 2 - 5 psi at a time.

Duncs
AnswerID: 364829

Reply By: Ozboc - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 16:58

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 16:58
" Bring out the Gibber" ( Pulp fiction - Gimp)



Boc
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Follow Up By: Willem - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 17:08

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 17:08
Gibber...also a colloquial word used in Central Australia by locals who want something from you.......LOL
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Reply By: Member Brian (Gold Coast) - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 17:33

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 17:33
I left my tyres at road pressure (40psi) last year on the Birdsville Rd, and 80k's from Birdsville had a puncture from a Gibber working it's way through the tread on a BFG Muddy. Learnt my lesson right there and then, and ran 28psi on the gibbers after that, but dropped my speed as well..... typically no faster than 70 - 80 kph. As someone else above said, it's a matter of personal preference.



Disclaimer: This is my opinion of what works best for me..... anyone that disagrees, save your breath, I ain't interested.


Cheers

Brian
AnswerID: 364861

Follow Up By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 17:48

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 17:48
This is absolutely correct but don't use a pressure. Thats is to say for most 4wd tyres and loads, 28 psi may be close to correct. For other tyres, loads and cars it may not. Use a 20% deflation or 220 to 240 mm long footprint and slow doen to less than 85 kph. ie 20% slower
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Reply By: Member - Colin H (NSW) - Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 19:59

Thursday, May 14, 2009 at 19:59
Got stuck down a one way track in Booti Booti NP in NSW and ended up with know way to turn around but on the sand . Had to drop the van off and reduce tyre pressure down to 20PSI and that did the trick got the patrol out of the sand and managed to pull the van around so we could drive back out .
You have to drop the pressure down to around the 20psi mark to get traction. After getting out I drove for a few k's until I then pumped the tyres back up to road pressure . Fun to say the least.
Cheers
Skin and Bones
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